what city is the gateway to the west

What does the Gateway to the West mean? Louis, Missouri, on the west side of the Mississippi River, stands a. Louis, which started calling itself the Gateway to the West after Eero Saarinen's Gateway Arch was erected, and I'm from Kansas City, where people think of St. which river is the gateway to the west.

What city is the gateway to the west -

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The National Park Service built the Gateway Arch in St. Louis to celebrate the millions of explorers and pioneers who settled the American West in the19th century.

The monument on the Mississippi River symbolizes where, in general, the massive Diaspora began, but some Missourians farther west believe that St. Louis commandeered the title to replace its previous nickname, Mound City.

Chief among them is CalvinTrillin,  a long-time staff writer forThe New Yorkermagazine and a Kansas City native. He has written for years about howSt. Louis took the name from his hometown.

“I can’t blame them for wanting to get rid of that sobriquet: Mound City,” he said. “But they did it by getting the federal government to build the Arch and then stole the 'Gateway to the West' from Kansas City.”

Credit Mitchell Cope

When he was growing up, Trillin said, many Kansas City businesses used the mantel in their names.

“Well, I can corroborate it very easily: I bought my first baseball mitt from the Gateway Sporting Goods store in Kansas City probably in the 1940s and there were other places named Gateway, too,” he said.

Jumping off points

Credit National Park Service

According to the Arch's National Park Service historian in St. Louis, Bob Moore, Trillin has a point.

“Well, the real start is Kansas City. There’s no doubt in my mind,” Moore said. “I mean, the Arch could have just as easily been in Kansas City, if you want to talk about jumping off points."

Moore explains there were a number of places where settlers and pioneers lit out for the territories, but in general, that point was farther west than St. Louis

“The main starting points were in Kansas City, Omaha, Council Bluffs – out at that line almost along the Missouri River,” he said.

Settlers would often buy their wagons and livestock in St. Louis, put their goods on a steamboat and sail up the Missouri River to one of those jumping off points, said Moore.

And, anyone who’s played the popular Oregon Trail computer game might remember that their group of settlers launched from Independence, Missouri, which borders Kansas City in Jackson County. 

Credit Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium

Former state representative and past president of the Jackson County Historical Society, Ralph Monaco, said he’s also well aware of the important role that the Kansas City area played as the starting point for travelers heading west, including on the the Santa Fe Trail and the Pony Express.

“When you start dealing with the trails going to Oregon, Santa Fe and California, nothing began in St. Louis. It all began in Jackson County,” he said.

But, even though he’s a true-blue Kansas City fan, he said he still has his reservations about which city really deserves the title.

“I’m kind of torn. I really am, because once something becomes a historical fact, I would never change it... I can understand why St. Louis wants to hold on to it,” he said.

As a historian, he said there are, of course, many valid reasons for St. Louis having the name Gateway to the West, above all for its role in the Louisiana Purchase and the early exploration of the continent.

“St. Louis does deserve that title only because of the historical framework around when it was founded in the 1760's and with the Louis and Clark Expedition in 1804,” he said.

There are, in fact, a number of other U.S. cities that also claim the name, including Fargo, North Dakota, Fort Wayne, Indiana and Omaha, Nebraska. Each city played a significant role in the westward expansion of the United States. But saying exactly where the East ends and the true West begins probably depends most on where you're from and where you're going. 

Follow Joseph Leahy on Twitter: @joemikeleahy     

Copyright 2015 St. Louis Public Radio

Источник: https://www.krcu.org/2015-10-27/is-st-louis-really-the-gateway-to-the-west

Is St. Louis really the Gateway to the West?

St. Louis, the Gateway City, is also known worldwide as the "Gateway to the West." But before the federal government erected the Gateway Arch 50 years ago this week, some historians say that Kansas City had a strong claim to the title.  

Click here to listen to St. Louis Public Radio’s Joseph Leahy explore where the East ended and the West may have really begun.

Credit Jan-Erik Finnberg

GATEWAY TO THE WEST

 Dictionary entry details 


GATEWAY TO THE WEST(noun)


Sense 1

Meaning:

The largest city in Missouri; a busy river port on the Mississippi River near its confluence with the Missouri River; was an important staging area for wagon trains westward in the 19th century

Classified under:

Nouns denoting spatial position

Synonyms:

Gateway to the West; Saint Louis; St. Louis

Instance hypernyms:

city; metropolis; urban center (a large and densely populated urban area; may include several independent administrative districts)

port (a place (seaport or airport) where people and merchandise can enter or leave a country)

Holonyms ("Gateway to the West" is a part of...):

Missouri; MO; Mo.; Show Me State (a midwestern state in central United States; a border state during the American Civil War, Missouri was admitted to the Confederacy without actually seceding from the Union)


 Learn English with... Proverbs 
"You can't run with the hare and hunt with the hounds." (English proverb)

"It is more becoming to have a large nose than two small ones" (Breton proverb)

"I see I forget. I hear I remember. I do I understand." (Chinese proverb)

"A good deed is worth gold." (Dutch proverb)





Источник: https://www.audioenglish.org/dictionary/gateway_to_the_west.htm

Visiting the Gateway Arch in St. Louis

To St. Louis locals, the Gateway Arch is a source of great pride. And for good reason. This stainless steel monstrosity is the tallest manmade monument in the Western Hemisphere and Missouri's tallest accessible building. As a city visitor, this gives you a good reason to lay your eyes on it. Daring tourists should hop a ride to the top in one of the arch's mini trams to gain the full experience. It's a unique attraction you won't find anywhere else. So while in St. Louis, don't pass up this one-of-a-kind landmark.

History

In 1935, the federal government selected the St. Louis riverfront as the site for a new national monument, honoring the pioneers who explored the American West. This spurred a nationwide competition in 1947, won by architect Eero Saarinen for his design of a giant stainless steel arch. Construction on the Arch began in 1963 and was completed in 1965. Today, St. Louis' Gateway Arch is, arguably, the most popular city attraction, with millions of people visiting it every year.

Fun Facts

As the country's tallest monument, the Gateway Arch sits at 630 feet tall. It is also 630 feet wide at its base and weighs more than 43,000 tons. The Arch may be heavy, but it was designed to sway with the wind. It moves up to an inch in a 20-mile-per-hour wind and can sway up to 18 inches if the winds hit 150 miles-per-hour. There are 1,076 stairs going up each leg of the Arch, but the tram system carries most of the visitors to the top (unless, of course, you want a good workout).

Ride to the Top

Some visitors can't stomach the four-minute ride to the top in one of the Arch's tiny trams. But for those who can, there's nothing quite like it. During the ride, you'll see the inner workings and structural supports of the monument, getting a sense of how it was built. Once on top, take in the views of St. Louis, the Mississippi River, and the Metro East from one of the Arch's 16 windows. And if you’ve already seen this site during the day, make the trip again at night to revel in the city lights.

Location and Hours

The Gateway Arch and Museum of Westward Expansion are located in downtown St. Louis on the Mississippi Riverfront. Both are open from daily 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., with expanded hours from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. between Memorial Day and Labor Day. The Old Courthouse just across the street is open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day, except Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day.

Visiting Tips

Everyone must obtain a ticket to enter the Arch. You can purchase an entry-only ticket or an entry and tram ride combo ticket, available at both adult and child rates. Kids younger than three are free. Tram tickets do sell out, so it's best to buy in advance and tickets can be purchased online.

The Arch's extended hours in the summer make it an ideal time to visit. Schedule your ticket to watch the sunset from the top. And if you plan on taking the tram up, expect to spend at least two hours at the Arch in order to gain the full experience. 

Regional Things to Do

The Gateway Arch is just one part of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial. Under the arch, you will find the Museum of Westward Expansion. This free museum features exhibits on Lewis and Clark and the 19th-century pioneers responsible for moving America’s borders westward. Across the street from the Arch is a third Memorial attraction, the Old Courthouse. This historic building hosted the famous Dred Scott Slavery Trial of 1857. Today, you can tour restored courtrooms and galleries. And if you visit during the holiday season, you’ll see some of the finest Christmas decorations in town.

Thanks for letting us know!

Источник: https://www.tripsavvy.com/gateway-arch-in-downtown-st-louis-3137449

St. Louis Then

St. Louis began as a fur trading post in 1764 when Pierre Lacle'de Luguest and Rene' Auguste Chouteau founded the town. Its location was easy to reach by the Indians and traders. This ease of proximity would propel the city throughout the next two hundred years. In the early days, after the French and Indian War ended in 1763, the Spanish rule on the west side of the river was preferred to the British rule to the east, and the town rapidly grew. When the US consummated the Louisiana Purchase in 1804, its role in western expansion was secured. The steamboat era began in 1817; it was the northernmost navigable point for large boats and culled another period of expansion. By 1850, it was the largest city west of Pittsburgh and the second largest port behind New York City.

It was a large city, and growing. In 1840, St. Louis had 20,000 people; by 1850, there were 77,860, and ten years later, 160,000. It had grown 800% in twenty years. And with this growth, it became the starting off point for the many wagon trails and later, railroad journeys, that pulled the population of the United States even further west into existing territories and soon to become states.

Jefferson National Expansion Memorial pays homage to Jefferson's role in expanding the boundaries of the United States as well as to the pioneers who settled the land.


Trails West Through the Missouri Gateway


California Trail - The largest migration in history crossed this trail in the 1840s and 1850 to the rich farm and gold fields of California. Over 1,000 miles long. Over 250,000 people.

Lewis and Clark Trail - The Corps of Discovery led by Meriweather Lewis and William Clark began their trek to find a water route to the west coast in 1804 and discovered a window west.

Oregon Trail - The famous trail over 2,000 miles that led fur traders, trappers, missionaries, and settlers west.

Pony Express Trail - The system of riding the mail from Missouri to California in only ten days prior to the Civil War and the railroad.

Santa Fe Trail - Leading from western Missouri west through Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, and Oklahoma.

Trail of Tears - The 1830's trail leading the forced migration of the Cherokee tribes from the southeastern part of the United States west.

Photo above: The Courthouse on the grounds of the park. Courtesy National Park Service. Below: View of St. Louis from the top of the Arch. Courtesy National Park Service.

St. Louis

St. Louis Now

The Gateway Arch - The modern symbol of the west was designed by Eero Saarinen. It's gleaming stainless steel can be toured with a tram ride to the top, as well as view movies about western expansion and visit the Museum of Western Expansion. The arch was completed on October 28, 1965. It is 630' high and 630' wide and cost $13 million to build.

Old Courthouse - Also on the grounds of the park sits the Old Courthouse, whose exhibits focus on the Dred Scott slavery decision and trial, as well as other important trails held within its walls.

Ranger Tours - Forty-five minutes tours are given for free by park rangers on a regular basis.



Источник: https://americasbesthistory.com/abh-stlouisgateway.html

On October 28, 1965, construction is completed on the Gateway Arch, a spectacular 630-foot-high catenarycurve of stainless steel marking the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial on the waterfront of St. Louis, Missouri.

The Gateway Arch, designed by Finnish-born, American-educated architect Eero Saarinen, was erected to commemorate President Thomas Jefferson’s Louisiana Purchase of 1803 and to celebrate St. Louis’ central role in the rapid westward expansion that followed. As the market and supply point for fur traders and explorers—including the famous Meriwether Lewis and William Clark—the town of St. Louis grew exponentially after the War of 1812, when great numbers of people began to travel by wagon train to seek their fortunes west of the Mississippi River. In 1947-48, Saarinen won a nationwide competition to design a monument honoring the spirit of the western pioneers. In a sad twist of fate, the architect died of a brain tumor in 1961 and did not live to see the construction of his now-famous arch, which began in February 1963. 

Completed in October 1965, the Gateway Arch cost less than $15 million to build. With foundations sunk 60 feet into the ground, its frame of stressed stainless steel is built to withstand both earthquakes and high winds. An internal tram system takes visitors to the top, where on a clear day they can see up to 30 miles across the winding Mississippi and to the Great Plains to the west. In addition to the Gateway Arch, the Jefferson Expansion Memorial includes the Museum of Westward Expansion and the Old Courthouse of St. Louis.

Today, some 4 million people visit the park each year to wander its nearly 100 acres, soak up some history and take in the breathtaking views from Saarinen’s gleaming arch.

Источник: https://www.history.com

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The National Park Service built the Gateway Arch in St. Louis to celebrate the millions of explorers and pioneers who settled the American West in the19th century.

The monument on the Mississippi River symbolizes where, in general, the massive Diaspora began, but some Missourians farther west believe that St. Louis commandeered the title to replace its previous nickname, Mound City.

Chief among them is CalvinTrillin,  a long-time staff writer forThe New Yorkermagazine and a Kansas City native. What city is the gateway to the west has written for years about howSt. What city is the gateway to the west took the name from his hometown.

“I can’t blame them for wanting to get rid of that sobriquet: Mound City,” he said. “But they did it by getting the federal government to build the Arch and then stole the 'Gateway to the West' from Kansas City.”

Credit Mitchell Cope

When he was growing up, Trillin said, many Kansas City businesses used the mantel in their names.

“Well, I can corroborate it very easily: I bought my first baseball mitt from the Gateway Sporting Goods store in Kansas City probably in the 1940s and there were other places named Gateway, too,” he said.

Jumping off points

Credit National Park Service

According to the Arch's National Park Service historian in St. Louis, Bob Moore, Trillin has a point.

“Well, the real start is Kansas City. There’s no doubt in my mind,” Moore said. “I mean, the Arch could have just as easily been in Kansas City, if you want to talk about jumping off points."

Moore explains there were a number of places where settlers and pioneers lit out for the territories, but in general, that point was farther west than St. Louis

“The main starting points were in Kansas City, Omaha, Council Bluffs – out at that line almost along the Missouri River,” he said.

Settlers would often buy their wagons and livestock in St. Louis, put their goods on a steamboat and sail up the Missouri River to one of those jumping off points, said Moore.

And, anyone who’s played the popular Oregon Trail computer game might remember that their group of settlers launched from Independence, Missouri, which borders Kansas City in Jackson County. 

Credit Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium

Former state representative and past president of the Jackson County Historical Society, Ralph Monaco, said he’s also well aware of the important role that the Kansas City area played as the starting point for travelers heading west, including on the the Santa Fe Trail and the Pony Express.

“When you start dealing with the trails going to Oregon, Santa Fe and California, nothing began in St. Louis. It all began in Jackson County,” he said.

But, even though he’s a true-blue Kansas City fan, he said he still has his reservations about which city really deserves the title.

“I’m kind of torn. I really am, onlinebanking mtb once something becomes a historical fact, I would never change it. I can understand why St. Louis wants to hold on to it,” he said.

As a historian, he said there are, of course, many valid reasons for St. Louis having the name Gateway to the West, above all for its role in the Louisiana Purchase and the early exploration of the continent. what city is the gateway to the west. Louis does deserve that title only because of the historical framework around when it was founded in the 1760's and with the Louis and Clark Expedition in 1804,” he said.

There are, in fact, a number of other U.S. cities that also claim the name, including Fargo, North Dakota, Fort Wayne, Indiana and Omaha, Nebraska. Each city played a significant role in the westward expansion of the United States. But saying exactly where the East ends and the true West begins probably depends most on where you're from and where you're going. 

Follow Joseph Leahy on Twitter: resultado america vs leon     

Copyright 2015 St. Louis Public Radio

Источник: https://www.krcu.org/2015-10-27/is-st-louis-really-the-gateway-to-the-west

GATEWAY TO THE WEST

 Dictionary entry details 


GATEWAY TO THE WEST(noun)


Sense 1

Meaning:

The largest city in Missouri; a busy river port on the Mississippi River near its confluence with the Missouri River; was an important staging area for wagon trains westward in the 19th century

Classified under:

Nouns denoting spatial position

Synonyms:

Gateway to the West; Saint Louis; St. Louis

Instance hypernyms:

city; metropolis; urban center (a large and densely populated urban area; may include several independent administrative districts)

port (a place (seaport or airport) where people and merchandise can enter or leave a country)

Holonyms ("Gateway to the West" is a part of.):

Missouri; MO; Mo.; Show Me State (a midwestern state in central United States; a border state during the American Civil War, Missouri was admitted to the Confederacy without actually seceding from the Union)


 Learn English with. Proverbs 
"You can't run chase you invest bonus the hare and hunt with the hounds." (English proverb)

"It is more becoming to have a large nose than two small ones" (Breton proverb)

"I see I forget. I hear I remember. I do I understand." (Chinese proverb)

"A good deed is worth gold." (Dutch proverb)





Источник: https://www.audioenglish.org/dictionary/gateway_to_the_west.htm

On October 28, 1965, construction is completed on the Gateway Arch, a spectacular 630-foot-high catenarycurve of stainless steel marking the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial on the waterfront of St. Louis, Missouri.

The Gateway Arch, designed by Finnish-born, American-educated architect Eero Saarinen, was erected to commemorate President Thomas Jefferson’s Louisiana Purchase of 1803 and to celebrate St. Louis’ central role in the rapid westward expansion that followed. As the market and supply point for fur traders and explorers—including the famous Meriwether Lewis and William Clark—the town of St. Louis grew exponentially after the War of 1812, when great numbers of people began to travel by wagon train to seek their fortunes west of the Mississippi River. In 1947-48, Saarinen won a nationwide competition to design a monument honoring the spirit of the western pioneers. In a sad twist of fate, the architect died of a brain tumor in 1961 and did not live to see the construction of his now-famous arch, which began in February 1963. 

Completed in October 1965, the Gateway Arch cost less than $15 million to build. With foundations sunk 60 feet into the ground, its frame of stressed stainless steel is built to withstand both what city is the gateway to the west and high winds. An internal tram system takes visitors to the top, where on a clear day they can see up to 30 miles across the winding Mississippi and to the Great Plains to the west. In addition to the Gateway Arch, the Jefferson Expansion Memorial includes the Museum of Westward Expansion and the Old Courthouse of St. Louis.

Today, some 4 million people visit the park each year to wander its nearly 100 acres, soak up some history and take in the breathtaking views from Saarinen’s gleaming arch.

Источник: https://www.history.com

Is St. Louis really the Gateway to the West?

St. Louis, the Gateway City, is also known worldwide as the "Gateway to the West." But before the federal government erected the Gateway Arch 50 years ago this week, some historians say that Kansas City had a strong claim to the title.  

Click here to listen to St. Louis Public Radio’s Joseph Leahy explore where what is pnc bank phone number East ended and the West may have really begun.

Credit Jan-Erik Finnberg

Visiting the Gateway Arch in St. Louis

To St. Louis locals, the Gateway Arch is a source of great pride. And for good reason. This stainless steel monstrosity is the tallest manmade monument in the Western Hemisphere and Missouri's tallest accessible building. As a city visitor, this gives you a good reason to lay your eyes on it. Daring tourists should hop a ride to the top in one of the arch's mini trams to gain the full experience. It's a unique attraction you won't find anywhere else. So while in St. Louis, don't pass up this one-of-a-kind landmark.

History

In 1935, the federal government selected the St. Louis riverfront as the site for a new national monument, honoring the pioneers who explored the American West. This spurred a nationwide competition in 1947, won by architect Eero Saarinen for his design of a giant stainless steel arch. Construction on the Arch began in 1963 and was completed in 1965. Today, St. Louis' Gateway Arch is, arguably, the most popular city attraction, with millions of people visiting it every year.

Fun Facts

As the country's tallest monument, the Gateway Arch sits at 630 feet tall. It is also 630 feet wide at its base and weighs more than 43,000 tons. The Arch may be heavy, but it was designed to sway with the wind. It moves up to an inch in a 20-mile-per-hour wind and can sway up to 18 inches if the winds hit 150 miles-per-hour. There are 1,076 stairs going up each leg of the Arch, but the tram system carries most of the visitors to the top (unless, of course, you want a good workout).

Ride to the Top

Some visitors can't stomach the four-minute ride to the top in one of the Arch's tiny trams. But for those who can, there's nothing quite like it. During the ride, you'll see the inner workings and structural supports of the monument, getting a sense of how it was built. Once on top, take in the views of St. Louis, the Mississippi River, and the Metro East from one of the Arch's 16 windows. And if you’ve already seen this site during what city is the gateway to the west day, make the trip again at night to revel in the city lights.

Location and Hours

The Gateway Arch and Museum of Westward Expansion are located in downtown St. Louis on the Mississippi Riverfront. Both are open from daily 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., with expanded hours from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. between Memorial Day and Labor Day. The Old Courthouse just across the street is open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day, except Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day.

Visiting Tips

Everyone must obtain a ticket to enter the Arch. You can purchase an entry-only ticket or an entry and tram ride combo ticket, available at both adult and child rates. Kids younger than three are free. Tram tickets do sell out, so it's best to buy in advance and tickets can be purchased online.

The Arch's extended hours in the summer make it an ideal time to visit. Schedule your what city is the gateway to the west to watch the sunset from the top. And if you plan on taking the tram up, expect to spend at least two hours at the Arch in order to gain the full experience. 

Regional Things to Do

The Gateway Arch is just one part of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial. Under the arch, you will find the Museum of Westward Expansion. This free museum features exhibits on Lewis and Clark and the 19th-century pioneers responsible for moving America’s borders westward. Across the street from the Arch is a third Memorial attraction, the Old Courthouse. This historic building hosted the famous Dred Scott Slavery Trial of 1857. Today, you can tour restored courtrooms and galleries. And if you visit during the holiday season, you’ll see some of the finest Christmas decorations in town.

Thanks for letting us know!

Источник: https://www.tripsavvy.com/gateway-arch-in-downtown-st-louis-3137449

12 Top-Rated Attractions & Things to Do in St. Louis, MO

Written by Lana Law
Updated May 20, 2021

We may earn a commission from affiliate links ()

St. Louis, the largest city in Missouri, lies just below the junction of the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, which here forms the boundary between Missouri and Illinois. The city has long been known as the "Gateway to the West" because it was from here that the Europeans set out to conquer the Wild West. But today, with so many things to do in St. Louis, you don't need to leave the city limits to have an adventure.

Spend a day or two seeing the sights and enjoy some dining and shopping. The Gateway Arch is the city's most famous site, but the city is home to many museums and interesting attractions. St. Louis is also home to St. Louis University, the oldest university west of the Mississippi, which was founded in 1818. The city's connection with Scott Joplin, "the father of Ragtime," ensures its fame as a music city.

Discover the best places to visit with our list of the top things to do in St. Louis.

See also: Where to Stay in St. Louis

Note: Some businesses may be temporarily closed due to recent global health and safety issues.

1. Gateway Arch

Gateway Arch

In the center of Jefferson National Expansion Memorial Park is the Gateway Arch, a symbol of the city's role as the "Gateway to the West." This parabolic arch of stainless steel, 625 feet high, was erected from 1959 to 1965 to the design of Eero Saarinen, based on an unexecuted project by Adalberto Libera for the entrance to the Esposizione Universale di Roma of 1942. It is the tallest monument in the United States.

Eight elevators run up to the observation platform on the highest point of the arch. You can also view the arch from the water on one of the many riverboat cruises, or by air in a helicopter tour. Tickets for the Gateway Arch are sold at the Gateway Arch Ticketing and Visitor Center in the Old Courthouse, which is located eight blocks (a 10- to 15-minute walk) from the arch. Advance purchase of tickets for the observation platform is recommended.

Official site: http://www.gatewayarch.com/

2. Old Courthouse

Old Courthouse

On the right-hand side of Market Street is a massive domed building, the Old Courthouse, which is part of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial Park. It was built in the mid 1800s and has been the scene of several important trials, including the suit by Dred Scott for freedom from slavery and Suffragist Virginia Louisa Minor for the right to vote.

The courthouse now showcases exhibits from the Museum of Westward Expansion. The Gateway Arch Ticketing and Visitor Center is also located in the Old Courthouse.

The courthouse is slated for a major renovation in 2021 that will include new galleries and an elevator. During this time, the building will be closed to visitors.

Address: 11 N. 4th Street, St. Louis, Missouri

Official site: https://www.nps.gov/jeff/planyourvisit/och.htm

3. Missouri Botanical Garden

Missouri Botanical Garden

The beautiful Missouri Botanical Garden is also known as the Shaw Garden, after the businessman and botanist Henry Shaw (1800-89) who laid it out in 1859. In the southeast part of the gardens are the richly appointed Tower Grove House, Henry Shaw's "garden house".

The gardens themselves comprise a lovely rose garden, the rather unusual Climatron, built in 1960 for tropical plants, a Japanese Garden, an "aqua-tunnel" under a water-lily pool, and a herbarium.

The Doris I. Schnuck Children's Garden is designed with youngsters in mind, with an aim towards educating and inspiring children in the field of horticulture. Within the garden are several tourist attractions, including a prairie village and treehouse. Special exhibits include the "Cave Experience," which is a man-made cave, and a wetlands area that includes a steamboat.

Address: 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, Missouri

Official site: http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/

4. Forest Park Attractions

Forest Park Attractions

Forest Park sits on the site of the 1904 World Fair, and some of the structures here still date from that time period. The Jefferson Memorial sits on the north side of the park and houses the Missouri History Museum, which includes historical exhibits about the state, St. Louis, and Charles Lindbergh.

In the center of the park, the City Art Museum has collections of art from prehistoric through contemporary works, and nearby is the Zoo.

To the east, near the Highlands Golf and Tennis Center, the Jewel Box contains a conservatory with hundreds of varieties of flowers. Beyond this, on the outside corner of the park, the St. Louis Science Center has plenty of attractions and things to do, including a planetarium, IMAX theater, and interactive exhibits for all ages.

5. Saint Louis Zoo

Tigers at the Saint Louis Zoo

The Saint Louis Zoo is located in Forest Park. You'll find it across the lawn, and an easy stroll from the City Art Museum. The zoo has more than 12,000 animals across 500 species. Residents include Asian elephants, hippos, gorillas, tree kangaroos, jaguars, and sea lions.

The zoo is a free attraction in St. Louis, making it available to everyone. Although you still have to pay a modest fee for parking, this is the only cost you'll have to bear, and it's a small price to pay for what the zoo has to offer.

Innovative pavilions house animals from around the world, and two of the best are the polar bear and hippopotamus pools. Here, you can be mere inches from these huge animals on the other side of thick glass.

The Sea Lion show is a favorite. You'll see high dives, Frisbee tosses, flipper walks, and other entertaining and educational antics. A small fee is charged for the show. Apart from the animals, fun rides for the kids are available, including a carousel, the miniature Zooline Railroad, and a 4D theater.

Official site: https://www.stlzoo.org/

6. Magic House, St. Louis Children's Museum

Magic House, St. Louis Children's Museum

Located in a three-story Victorian home, the Magic House museum provides hands-on exhibits about science, communications, and computers. Exhibits are divided into themed areas and encourage engagement from children. Each area is designed to enhance curiosity and experimentation.

There is a designated play area for babies and toddlers, as well as the Calming Corner, a room how to transfer hsa funds to bank account with activities and toys that are soothing, which is a haven for children who need a break from sensory overload. The museum café specializes in healthy fresh-food options; many of the ingredients are grown on-site.

Address: 516 South Kirkwood Road, St. Louis, Missouri

Official site: http://www.magichouse.org/

7. City Museum

City Museum

The City Museum, housed in a former shoe factory, is a delightfully entertaining facility that both children and adults will appreciate. Exhibits include a giant aquarium, architectural museum, art activities, participatory circus, and oddities, among many others.

The museum's major structures and installations were made entirely of materials found within the St. Louis municipal area. The building itself is an impressive piece of architecture, and its design is the brainchild of sculptor and artist Bob Cassilly.

Address: 701 North 15th Street, Saint Louis, Missouri

Official site: http://www.citymuseum.org/

8. Market Street

Market Street

Across the I 70, beside the Gateway Arch, is the start of Market Street. The city's main street, it is lined by important buildings and halfway along opens out into St. Louis Memorial Plaza. On the left-hand side is the gigantic rotunda of the Busch Stadium, which has seating for 50,000 spectators.

The stadium is home to the St. Louis Cardinals, the city's baseball team, whose history is documented in the St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame. The neighboring National Bowling Hall of Fame does the same for bowling.

Farther along Market Street, on the left, is City Hall, which was modeled on the Hotel de Ville in Paris. There are some interesting buildings in the streets running north from Market Street. On 14th Street is the Soldiers Memorial Building, commemorating all fallen American soldiers. At the corner of 14th Street and Market Street is the Kiel Auditorium.

9. Old Cathedral (Basilica of St. Louis, King)

Old Cathedral (Basilica of St. Louis, King)

Southwest of the Gateway Arch is the Old Cathedral, the Catholic Basilica of St. Louis of France. Built from 1831 to 1834 on the site of the first church of St. Louis (1770), it survived the 1849 fire unscathed. On the west side of the cathedral is the Old Cathedral Museum, covering the history of the city. The interior of the church is decorated with complex mosaics, and ongoing restoration projects have returned the dome and bell towers to their original glory.

Address: 209 Walnut Street, St. Louis, Missouri

Official site: http://www.oldcathedralstl.org/

10. Scott Joplin House

Scott Joplin House

Music lovers will appreciate this attraction. Scott Joplin, the composer and pianist known as the "father of Ragtime," lived in this house from 1901 to 1903. He was most famous for pieces like the Maple Leaf Rag, and was awarded a Pulitzer Prize after his death.

Maintained by Missouri State Parks, the house is furnished in period to the early 1900s and includes memorabilia and a player piano featuring the artist's music. Interpretive programs and tours are available to visitors.

Address: 2658 Delmar Street, Saint Louis, Missouri

Official site: https://mostateparks.com/park/scott-joplin-house-state-historic-site

11. Campbell House Museum

Campbell House Museum

Built in 1851, this three story townhouse has been accurately restored with its carriage house, rose garden, and gazebo, offers a showcase of Victorian furnishings and decorative arts. Campbell House Museum features original furnishings from the family who lived here from 1854 through 1938.

The museum what city is the gateway to the west includes classic Rococo-Revival Victorian furniture, portraits, textiles, silver, gold-leaf frames and cornices, faux-grained woodwork, and other examples of decorative arts.

Address: 1508 Locust Street, St. Louis, Missouri

Official site: http://www.campbellhousemuseum.org/

12. Laumeier Sculpture Park

Laumeier Sculpture Park

The What city is the gateway to the west Sculpture Park features an outdoor collection sculptures designed to showcase contemporary art in a natural environment. Trees and natural woodland with hiking trails surround the sculptures. The park features permanent and temporary displays. Also on site is an indoor gallery with changing exhibits.

Address: 12580 Rott Road, St. Louis, Missouri

Official site: http://www.laumeiersculpturepark.org/

Where to Stay in St. Louis for Sightseeing

There are several interesting neighborhoods in St. Louis, but first-time visitors who plan to sightsee would be best off finding accommodation right downtown. This is where the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial Park and the Gateway Arch are located, along with many other important attractions. Below are some highly rated hotels in convenient locations:

Luxury Hotels:

  • Located downtown in the entertainment district, near the Gateway Arch, is the posh Four Seasons Hotel, with a beautiful outdoor pool and patio area overlooking the Mississippi River and the Arch.
  • One of the most unique hotels in St. Louis is the St. Louis Union Station, Curio Collection by Hilton, set in the grand old Union Station building dating from 1894. The Grand Hall lobby of this hotel is exquisite.
  • Also downtown is the boutique Magnolia Hotel, a Tribute Portfolio, with a contemporary feel. It offers regular rooms, suites, and an extended-stay program.

Mid-Range Hotels:

Budget Hotels:

  • Since the city center lacks budget hotels, the best option is to find a hotel outside the city center, although this requires a little driving. The Red Roof Inn Plus St Louis-Forest Park/Hampton Avenue, is a good value option about a 10-minute drive from downtown.
  • Even closer is the Community bank na clarks summit pa Avyan, a former Holiday Inn Express, with basic but comfortable rooms.

More Places to Explore near St. Louis

St. Louis sits at the eastern edge of Missouri, while at the far western border is Kansas City, known for its barbecue and jazz music. Outside its two big cities, Missouri has several attractions worth visiting, including Silver Dollar City in Branson, Wilson's Creek National Battlefield in Republic, and the Mark Twain Boyhood Home and Museum in Hannibal.

North of St. Louis is Springfield, the capital of Illinois, and beyond it is What city is the gateway to the west. About the same distance from St. Louis as Kansas City are Indianapolis, in Indiana, and Louisville, in Kentucky, both to the east, and the Tennessee cities of Nashville and Memphis are to the south.

St. Louis Map - Tourist AttractionsSt Louis Map - Attractions (Historical)
Источник: https://www.planetware.com/tourist-attractions-/st-louis-us-mo-sl.htm

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