are the outer banks open

All OBX areas will open to visitors on May 16. Since North Carolina is entering Phase I recovery, many restrictions and recommendations. Outer Banks Peak Season Dates. Outer Banks Beach Summer Vacation almost every business that was operating during the summer is still open for business. Cape Hatteras/Outer Bank KOA Resort offers campsites and vacation rentals to meet your every need. Learn more! Cape Hatteras KOA Resort is open!
are the outer banks open
are the outer banks open

Outer Banks opens to visitors Saturday

CURRITUCK COUNTY, N.C. - Currituck County, Dare County, and Hyde County announced that restrictions on entry for visitors have been lifted in response to Governor Roy Cooper's Phase One announcement.

The restrictions were lifted at 12:01 a.m. on May 16.

Governor Cooper issued Executive Order 138 earlier in May, which modified North Carolina’s Stay at Home order and transitioned the state into Phase One of slowly easing certain COVID-19 restrictions.

The lifting of restrictions is for the towns of Duck, Southern Shores, Kitty Hawk, Kill Devil Hills, Nags Head and Manteo; Hatteras Island; Roanoke Island; the Dare mainland; the Currituck County Outer Banks; campgrounds on the Currituck County mainland; and Ocracoke Island.

Officials sad allowing visitors on May 16 will allow seven days for local businesses, attractions, and accommodations providers to prepare for the arrival of visitors.

Before traveling to the Outer Banks, officials advise visitors to contact their accommodations provider to confirm their reservation and arrival plans.

Officials says the following guidelines are still set in place:
· Social distancing guidelines are still in place
· Public gatherings are limited to 10 people or less
· Getting food from restaurants continues to be on a take-out or delivery basis
· Businesses, including grocery stores, have limits on the number of people allowed in the store at any given time based on square footage
· Personal care and grooming businesses and entertainment businesses without retail or dining are not open yet based on State regulations which are not determined or controlled by our local government

Officials advise visitors if possible, to bring essentials, including paper products and non-perishable groceries, due to shortages.

For more information, click here.

Click here for full coronavirus coverage.

Источник: https://www.wtkr.com/news/coronavirus/outer-banks-counties-announce-opening-date-for-visitors

Is the Outer Banks beaches open?

The Outer Banks now open to visitors!

What is the curfew in Dare County?

North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper’s new Modified Stay-at-Home Order, one that essentially imposes a curfew between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m., goes into effect on Friday, Dec.

Is Hatteras Island closed to visitors?

Both Cape Lookout and Cape Hatteras national seashores have remained open to visitors during the pandemic, though facilities including restrooms and camp grounds have been closed.

What is the non emergency for Dare County NC?

(252)

What is the phone number for Dare County?

Dare County, NCPHONE: FAX: HONE: FAX: HONE: FAX: HONE: FAX: HONE: FAX: HONE: FAX: HONE: FAX: HONE: FAX: ais 7 linhas

How much does a Dare County Sheriff make?

Average annual salary was $46,505 and median salary was $42,417. Dare County average salary is 1 percent lower than USA average and median salary is 2 percent lower than USA median.

How much do teachers make in Dare County?

WRAL News requested the salary data and ranked it, which showed that Dare County Schools has the top spot with an average teacher salary of $59,223 this school year.

How much does a Dare County paramedic make?

Initial salaries for Emergency Medical Technicians are about $24,000 to $29,000, while paramedics can start at a little over $32,000. This year, salaries were budgeted at $3.1 million and overtime at $1.4 million. At Monday’s Board of Commissioners meeting, two speakers expressed concerns about changes in scheduling.

What is the Dare County School Boss program?

(BOSS Program) Every employee in Dare County Schools receives a BOSS card for the duration of their employment. The BOSS card also entitles the employee to free admission to Dare County Schools athletic events.

What is the pay scale for Dare County Schools?

Average Salary for Dare County Schools EmployeesCustodian. $20k – $44k.Middle School Teacher. $37k – $73k.School Psychologist. $37k – $64k.

Who is the Dare County staff?

Main Switchboard: 252.475. 5000StaffTitlePhoneAnby, CherylClerk to the Board of Commissionersnders, RobertDeputy Sheriffnderson, CaitlinIncome Maintenance Caseworkernderson, GabeWTP Operator – Skycoais 16 linhas

What high schools are in Dare County?

First Flight High School. Kill Devil Hills, NC. Dare County Schools. #1in Dare County Schools Rankings. Manteo High School. Manteo, NC. Dare County Schools. #2in Dare County Schools Rankings. Cape Hatteras Secondary School. Buxton, NC. Dare County Schools. Dare Learning Academy. Manteo, NC. Dare County Schools.

What is the Dare County Tax?

The minimum combi sales tax rate for Dare County, North Carolina is 6.75%. This is the total of state and county sales tax rates. The North Carolina state sales tax rate is currently 4.75%. The Dare County sales tax rate is 2%.

What are Dare County school lunches?

Dare County Schools offers healthy meals every school day. Breakfast costs $1.25; lunch costs $2.75 in elementary and $3.00 in middle and high schools.

Who is on the Dare County Board of Education?

Board of EducationElected OfficialsBoard of EducationTerm EndsCarl Woody124 Raleigh Wood Dr. Manteo, NC argaret Lawler, Vice-Chairman81 Gravey Pond Lane Kitty Hawk ary Ellon Ballance, ChairmanPO Box 756 Hatteras oe TauberPO Kill Devil Hills ais 3 linhas

Who is the Dare County Commissioners meeting?

Meetings are generally held on the first Monday of the month at 9 a.m. and the third Monday of each month at 5 p.m. Occasionally this schedule is adjusted to accommodate holidays, and there are a few months each year when only one meeting is conducted.

What is the Dare County Board of Education meetings?

Board of Education Meeting Schedule DateTimeLocation of MeetingOctober 13, p.m.Kitty Hawk Elementary SchoolNovember 10, p.m.Manteo Elementary SchoolDecember 8, p.m.Manteo High SchoolJanuary 12, p.m.First Flight Elementary SchoolMais 6 linhas

Where was Outer Banks filmed?

Charleston

Where is John B’s house in real life?

The John B’s house pier is located in the Secessionville Historic Are the outer banks open also in James Island, but if you are visiting the neighborhood, please respect the private properties of the area! The success of the series has caused a lot of trespassing that is very unwelcome for the owners.

Why is Outer Banks not in Outer Banks?

Outer Banks was not filmed in the actual Outer Banks. The show was originally intended to shoot in North Carolina, but showrunners moved it out of the state in response of the HB2 transgender bathroom bill. Instead, the show was filmed outside of Charleston, South Carolina.

Источник: https://electroanswers.com/computer-hardware/is-the-outer-banks-beaches-open/

Outer Banks Coronavirus Updates: Beach & Travel Restrictions

Coronavirus response

We are doing everything we can to make sure you, our valued guests and extended Twiddy family, are the outer banks open well taken care of. In return, we ask for your patience as we navigate this unprecedented event. On this page we will outline Outer Banks coronavirus updates, both from Twiddy and the state of North Carolina. For detailed information on Outer Banks Covid restrictions, jump to our bulletins section.

Latest Coronavirus Update - Updated July 30, 2021

The Governor of North Carolina issued a new Executive Order yesterday. More details below.

Read more

Committed to Safety

The safety and wellbeing of our guests are a top priority, and the cleanliness of our homes is something we take very seriously. We remain committed to upholding the highest standards of cleanliness by using cleaning products widely-used in the vacation rental industry. Additionally, we are using this time to put extra attention into getting our homes ready for the upcoming season.

Housekeeping

  • Our housekeeping crews are thoroughly trained before preparing any homes.
  • Our housekeeping supervision team works in the field to help ensure proper practices are being followed.
  • We are supplying cleaning crews and staff with the necessary Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).
  • We are taking additional precautions such as more targeted disinfecting of high touch/high traffic surfaces including tables, faucets, and doorknobs.
  • We are utilizing products that are EPA-approved for use against the virus that causes COVID-19.
  • Bed sheets and bath towels are provided by a state of the art commercial laundry facility.
  • Pools and hot tubs are cleaned and have the chemicals balanced between guests.

Field Services

  • Our Field Technicians assist in preparing homes for arrival, as well as handle various maintenance concerns that may arise during your stay.
  • Field Technicians will wear necessary Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) when entering homes.
  • Maintenance issues are addressed by our Field Technicians with as little interruption to are the outer banks open stay as possible.

Frequently Asked Questions

Cleaning & Safety Measures

What steps are your cleaners taking and what products are you using in the homes?

We’re committed to upholding the highest standards of cleanliness by using CDC-recommended and EPA-approved products to clean our homes. We’re ensuring are the outer banks open our house cleaners continue to pay special attention to frequently touched surfaces including tables, faucets, railings, and doorknobs. The safety and well-being of our guests are a top priority and the cleanliness of our homes is something we take very seriously.

Our Field Supervisors perform routine quality assurance audits to ensure that cleaning and inspection processes are followed. For reservations that include linens, beds will be made with fitted sheet, flat sheet and pillow cases only. In an effort to limit contact with your bedding, other bedding will be placed in the closet of the bedroom, including extra pillows, shams, comforters and blankets.Click here to learn more about our cleaning procedures in response to COVID-19.Click here to learn more about our cleaning procedures in response to COVID-19.

Are the warmth layers, such as blankets, on the beds washed weekly?

Blankets are not laundered weekly, however, in order to limit contact with personal use items, beds will be made with fitted sheet, flat sheet, and pillow cases only. Blankets will be placed in the closets and will not be on the beds.You are welcome to use the washer and dryer at the home if you would like to launder blankets prior to using, but please know not all will fit in the machines. We encourage you to bring your own blankets from home.

Are my sheets clean? Did someone touch them?

Sheets and towels are laundered in a highly automated and sophisticated commercial laundry facility, where they are wrapped in plastic immediately after laundering. Beds are made by our housekeepers who are instructed on proper handling of laundry.

Can COVID-19 be transmitted in a pool or hot tub?

Pools and hot tubs are cleaned and chemically treated prior to each guest's arrival, as well as a midweek chemical check. The CDC has stated there is no evidence that COVID-19 can be spread to humans through the use of pools, hot tubs or spas, or water playgrounds. Proper operation, maintenance, and disinfection (e.g., with chlorine and bromine) of pools, hot tubs or spas, and water playgrounds should inactivate the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

When You Get Here

Is the Outer Banks in short supply of anything?

Currently we are not experiencing widespread shortages of groceries on the Outer Banks. However, like many places in the United States, all shoppers should expect to see changes in product availability at grocery and retail outlets as supply chain demand fluctuates across the nation. If possible, visitors should bring essentials with them, including paper and sanitizing products and non-perishable groceries.

Access & Reservation Questions

When did the travel restrictions lift and the Outer Banks reopen?

Following the outbreak of the novel coronavirus and growing concerns for the community, local officials made the decision to restrict entry to the Outer Banks to residents only beginning in March 2020. Re-entry for visitors to the Outer Banks began on Saturday, May 16th at 12:01 AM. Click here for more information from Dare County.

What are my options if I do not plan on coming on my vacation?

We would love the opportunity to try and find a solution that works for your group and the homeowner. These are the steps to take, in order:

  1. Begin the re-market process in an attempt to get the home/week re-rented. We have already seen an influx of guests who are interested in booking an Outer Banks vacation
  2. If you have purchased travel insurance, start the claim process. If you have questions, contact Generali Global Assistance at 866-999-4018 and reference plan code G-332CSA.
  3. If the re-market process and/or travel insurance claim is unsuccessful, you may be able to reschedule your vacation for a future week(s) in the same house pending owner approval.

If your arrival date is prior to 5/16/2020, your reservation is affected by the Outer Banks bridge closure and you are eligible for a refund. If you prefer to switch your travel dates instead of the refund, please contact our office.

What is the Twiddy & Company cancellation/refund policy in response to COVID-19?

Given the unique and rapidly changing nature of this situation, we are handling each reservation individually. We understand one solution may not work for everyone. Rest assured meredith village savings bank online banking are doing our best to help each and every guest as we all navigate these uncharted waters together.

If your arrival date was before 5/16/2020, your reservation is affected by restricted access to the Outer Banks. You will receive a refund of all monies paid. The refund will include the rental fee, home service fee, taxes, and travel insurance (if purchased), and will be processed on the Monday following the last day of your scheduled vacation.

If you prefer to reschedule your vacation for a future week(s) in the same house instead of a refund, please contact our office.

Am I covered by travel insurance?

Since we are not licensed insurance agents, and due to the unique nature of this situation, all travel insurance-related questions should be directed to Generali Global Assistance 866-999-4018. Please reference plan code G-332CSA. We also encourage you to read Generali’s position statement regarding COVID-19 coverage.

My affected reservation dates have passed and I opted for a refund. When will I receive it?

The refund is processed once the departure date has passed. Refunds include all monies paid for the vacation including the rental fee, home service fee, taxes, and travel insurance (if applicable).

All monies will be returned to the leaseholder and any additional payers via the method of the original payment. If the rental amount was paid electronically, via credit card or eCheck, the refund will be processed through our third-party processor. If the original payment was via paper check, monies will be returned via paper check.

Our team is working hard to process all refunds within 15-30 days of the departure date. However, it may take additional time for the financial institutions to finalize the refund and post to your credit card account or deposit to your bank account.

Additional Resources

County Websites

Local County Websites

Please monitor these official resources

Travel Insurance

Travel Insurance Information

Please contact Generali Global Assistance directly

Latest Outer Banks Coronavirus Updates

  • Bulletin #24

    July 30, 2021
  • Bulletin #23

    May 14, 2021
  • Bulletin #22

    April 29, 2021
  • Bulletin #21

    March 23, 2021
  • Bulletin #20

    December 8, 2020
  • Bulletin #19

    November 12, 2020
  • Bulletin #18

    October 5, 2020
  • Bulletin #17

    September 2, 2020
  • Bulletin #16

    July 2, 2020
  • Bulletin #15

    May 20, 2020
  • Bulletin #14

    May 6, 2020
  • Bulletin #13

    April 27, 2020
  • Bulletin #12

    April 21, 2020
  • Bulletin #11

    April 17, 2020
  • Bulletin #10

    March 30, 2020
  • Bulletin #9

    March 27, 2020
  • Bulletin #8

    March 25, 2020
  • Bulletin #7

    March 23, 2020
  • Bulletin #6

    March metro vacuum vnb 83ba, 2020
  • Bulletin #5

    March 20, 2020
  • Bulletin #4

    March 20, 2020
  • Bulletin #3

    March 18, 2020
  • Bulletin #2

    March 18, 2020
  • Bulletin #1

    March 17, 2020

Bulletin #24: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Friday, July 30, 2021 9:56 AM

The Governor of North Carolina has issued a new Executive Order which includes a recommendation that everyone wears masks indoors. This is currently only a suggestion and there are no new or additional mandates in place on the Outer Banks at this time. Read the full Executive Order

More Details on North Carolina Phased Reopening.

Please visit the Dare County website for more details and answers to frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19 regulations on the Outer Banks specifically.

Bulletin #22: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Thursday, April 29, 2021 4:50 PM

Effective this Friday, April 30, 2021, the Governor of North Carolina will continue the phased approach of easing of certain COVID-19 restrictions. Particularly, indoor gathering limits have increased to 100, and outdoor limits have increased to 200. Read the full Executive Order

More Details on North Carolina Phased Reopening.

Please visit the Dare County website for more details and answers to frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19 regulations on the Outer Banks specifically.

Bulletin #21: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Tuesday, March 23, 2021 2:33 PM

Effective this Friday, March 26, 2021, the Governor of North Carolina will continue the phased approach of easing of certain COVID-19 restrictions. Face coverings will still be required in indoor and outdoor spaces where social distancing cannot be maintained.

More Details on North Carolina Phased Reopening.

Please visit the Dare County website for more details and answers to frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19 regulations on the Outer Banks specifically.

Bulletin #20: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Tuesday, December 8, 2020 4:00 PM

The Governor of North Carolina has issued a modified stay at home order effective Friday, December 11, 2020 at 5:00 pm through January 8, 2021 at 5:00 pm, unless otherwise modified or extended.

Executive Order are the outer banks open implements a modified stay at home order. The Order also extends the capacity limitations, indoor and outdoor gathering limits, and other public health restrictions put in place under previous executive orders.

Details on North Carolina Phase 3 can be found here.

Please visit the Dare County website for more details and answers to frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19 regulations on the Outer Banks.

Bulletin #19: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Thursday, November 12, 2020 3:10 PM

North Carolina entered Phase 3 of Safer at Home, the Governor’s three-phase plan to reopen North Carolina amid the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, on October 2 at 5:00 pm. An extension of the Phase 3 order is going into effect Friday, November 13, 2020. 

Executive Order 176 is adjusting limits on indoor mass gatherings to protect public health. Previously, indoor gatherings of up to 25 people were allowed. Now, Indoor gatherings are not to exceed ten people. The order states “When more than ten (10) people reside in the same household, residing together does not form a Mass Gathering.” This gathering restriction does not apply to occupants of vacation homes.

Details on North Carolina Phase 3 can be found here.

Please visit the Dare County website for more details and answers to frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19 regulations on the Outer Banks.

Bulletin #18: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Monday, October 25, 2020 2:26 PM

North Carolina entered Phase 3 of Safer at Home, the Governor’s three-phase plan to reopen North Carolina amid the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, on October 2 at 5:00 pm. Phase 3 will remain in effect until at least October are the outer banks open. Mask mandates and other prevention methods remain in effect. Changes from Phase 2.5 to Phase 3 include:

  • Bars’ outdoor seating areas may reopen at 30% capacity. Indoor bar areas remain closed.
  • Movie theaters may reopen at 30% capacity or 100 people, whichever is less.
  • The limits on mass gatherings will remain at 25 people indoors and 50 people outdoors.
  • The 11 pm curfew on alcohol sales for in-person consumption in locations such as restaurants and outdoor bars will be extended to October 23.

Details on North Carolina Phase 3 can be found here.

Please visit the Dare County website for more details and answers to frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19 regulations on the Outer Banks.

Bulletin #17: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Wednesday, September 2, 2020 6:39 AM

North Carolina will enter Phase 2.5 of Safer at Home, the Governor’s three-phase plan to reopen North Carolina amid the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, on September 4 at 5:00 pm and will remain in effect until at least October 2nd. Mask mandates and other prevention methods remain in effect. Bars, nightclubs, movie theaters, and indoor entertainment facilities remain closed. Changes from Phase 2 to Phase 2.5 include:  

  • Mass gathering limits increase to 25 people indoors and 50 people outdoors.
  • Playgrounds may open. 
  • Museums and aquariums may open at 50% capacity. 
  • Gyms and indoor exercise facilities may open at 30% capacity. 

Details on North Carolina Phase 2.5 can be found here.

Please visit the Dare County website for more details and answers to frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19 regulations on the Outer Banks.

Bulletin #16: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Thursday, July 2, 2020 8:39 AM

In the state of North Carolina, individuals are currently required to wear where to find routing transit number face covering in indoor and outdoor public spaces where social distancing cannot be maintained.

Please visit the Dare County website for more details and answers to frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19 regulations on the Outer Banks.

Bulletin #15: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Wednesday, May 20, 2020 6:27 PM

The Outer Banks has reopened for visitors as of May 16th.

For our guests who would like to reinstate their reservations, please email [email protected] with reservation details including confirmation number.

Beginning Friday, May 22 at 5:00 PM, North Carolina's Safer at Home Order transitions to Phase 2 of easing certain COVID-19 restrictions. Click here for greater boston food bank twitter information on NC Governor Roy Cooper's COVID-19 Executive Orders.

Bulletin #14: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Wednesday, May 6, 2020 12:56 PM

The Outer Banks will reopen to visitors on Saturday, May 16th.

Dare County, in coordination with Hyde and Currituck Counties, will lift restrictions on entry for visitors beginning Saturday, May 16 at 12:01 AM. Law enforcement continues to enforce entry restrictions until then. Click here for more details on the Dare county website.

For our guests who would like to reinstate their reservations, please email [email protected] with reservation details including confirmation number.

Beginning Friday, May 8 at 5:00 PM, North Carolina's Stay at Home Order transitions to Phase 1 of slowly easing certain COVID-19 restrictions. Click here for more information on NC Phase 1 reopening.

Bulletin #13: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Monday, April 27, 2020 5:48 PM

Travel restrictions remain in place with no set reopening date yet. There has been a change to Currituck's County's previous statement.

Currituck and Dare counties have announced they will now work together on a coordinated reentry date for visitors to the Outer Banks. As such, Currituck County will remove the May 15th date from their State of Emergency and will move forward with a coordinated plan between the two counties.

Following the Governor’s action with regard to the statewide Stay at Home Order, which has been extended to May 8, Currituck and Dare County officials will meet again to establish a timeline for visitor entry to the Currituck and Dare Outer Banks. A joint announcement will be made once a date has been agreed upon. No date has been issued yet.

We continue to experience historically high call and email volume. We apologize for the longer than normal wait times, but please know our team is working hard to help each and every guest. If you are not traveling within the next two weeks, we ask that you contact us closer to your trip to allow us to prioritize those with more immediate travel plans. In the meantime, please stay tuned to our website or local county websites for the most up-to-date information.

Bulletin #12: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Tuesday, April 21, 2020 7:24 PM

Travel restrictions are still in place on the Outer Banks with no opening date yet, however, the counties have begun to plan for reentry.

Currituck County will begin to allow non-resident property owners access this Thursday, April 23rd. Currituck County has anticipated May 15th re-entry for visitors, but will re-evaluate on May 4th to confirm. For more details, please visit Currituck County's website.

Dare County will offer tiered reentry for non-resident property owners based on last name beginning on Monday, May 4th. At this time, there has been no date set for visitor reentry. Dare county will address visitor access at a future date to allow for necessary syndromic surveillance and monitoring of resource availability. Dare County’s Stay Home - Stay Healthy order has been extended to May 22, 2020. For more details, please visit Dare County's website.

In addition, all individuals in Dare County are now required to wear a mask or are the outer banks open face covering in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain.

It is important to remember that these dates are still subject to change. We will continue to share updates as new information becomes available.

We continue to experience high call volume. It is important to us that everyone gets the assistance they need. If you are not traveling within the next two weeks, we ask that you contact us closer to your trip to allow us to prioritize those with more immediate travel plans. In the meantime, please stay tuned to our website or local county websites for the most up-to-date information.

Bulletin #11: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Friday, April 17, 2020 3:29 PM

We are currently experiencing high call volume. It is important to us that everyone gets the assistance they need. If you are not traveling within the next two weeks, we ask that you contact us closer to your trip to allow us to prioritize those with more immediate travel plans.

Travel restrictions are currently still in place on the Outer Banks that deny access to non-residents. At this time, we do not know when the bridge may be open again. In this time of uncertainty, we are doing everything we can to make sure you, our valued guests and extended Twiddy family, are well taken care of. In return, we ask for your patience as we navigate this unprecedented event.

Given the unique and rapidly changing nature of this situation, we are handling each of your upcoming reservations individually. It is important to us that everyone gets the personal assistance they need.

If you have a reservation scheduled to arrive:

  • Within the next 14 days - please get in touch with us to discuss options for your vacation.
  • Outside of the next 14 days - we ask that you contact us closer to your trip to allow us to prioritize those with more immediate travel plans. Plus, things very well could change before then. In the meantime, stay tuned to our website for updates.

Please read more on our Response to Coronavirus page.

Also for your beach fix from home, visit our OBX From Home page.

Bulletin #10: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Monday, March 30, 2020 2:55 PM

As of March 30 at 5:00pm, the Governor has issued a Stay Home order for all of North Carolina. The Order directs people to stay at home except to visit essential businesses, to exercise outdoors, or to help a family member. Specifically, the order bans gatherings of more than 10 people and directs everyone to physically stay at least six feet apart from others. This Order permits the following businesses to remain open:

  • Restaurants that provide take-out, drive-thru, or delivery
  • Grocery stores
  • ABC stores and beer and wine stores
  • Doctors and other healthcare providers
  • Pharmacies
  • Hardware stores
  • Post offices
  • Gas stations and convenience stores
  • Veterinarians and pet supply stores
  • Hotels, airlines, buses, taxis, and rideshare services
  • Places of worship
  • Child care providers

Click here to view a full list of FAQs on the Stay at Home Order.

Travel restrictions remain in place. Visitors and non-resident property owners are not permitted access to the Outer Banks. Stay tuned to official county websites for the most up to date and accurate information:

We will also continue to post bulletins and updates on social media as information becomes available.

Bulletin #9: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Friday, March 27, 2020 3:25 PM

Additional restrictions have been added to the State of Emergency Declaration that is currently in effect in Dare County. The “Stay Home - Stay Healthy” declaration goes into effect on Saturday, March 28 at 5:00PM and is being implemented to further minimize opportunities for exposure and transmission of COVID-19 in Dare County. This is not a Shelter in Place order. For more information and details please visit darenc.com/covid19.  Click for a “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” guide with frequently asked questions.

Currituck County has established a checkpoint just north of Sanderling. The main goal of this checkpoint is to monitor the flow of traffic in and out of Corolla as the county continues to assess local conditions. Anyone who has passed the main checkpoint to gain access to Dare County across the Wright Memorial Bridge will be allowed to pass between Dare County and Currituck County on the Outer Banks.

Travel restrictions remain in place. Visitors and non-resident property owners are not permitted access to the Outer Banks. Stay tuned to official county websites for the most up to date and accurate information:

We will also continue to post bulletins and updates on social media as information becomes available.

Bulletin #8: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Wednesday, March 25, 2020 5:51 PM

The health and safety of guests, homeowners, and staff remain our top priority. As a reminder, Twiddy & Company has switched to a remote office workforce until further notice. We are still available by phone every day from 9:00AM to 5:00PM.

We are currently experiencing high call volume. It is important to us that everyone gets the assistance they need. If you are not traveling within the next two weeks, we ask that you contact us closer to your trip to allow us to prioritize those with more immediate travel plans and continue to monitor our website for any updates.

Travel restrictions remain in place. Stay tuned to official county websites for the most up to date and accurate information:

We will also continue to post bulletins and updates on social media as information becomes available.

Bulletin #7: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Monday, March 23, 2020 12:42 PM

We are currently experiencing high call volume. It is important to us that everyone gets the assistance they need. If you are not traveling within the next two weeks, we ask that you contact optimum pay bill telephone closer to your trip to allow us to prioritize those with more immediate travel plans and continue to monitor our website for any updates.

Stay tuned to official county websites for the most up to date and accurate information:

Read more on our blog post. We will continue to post bulletins and updates on social media as information becomes available.

Bulletin #6: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Saturday, March 21, are the outer banks open 1:36 PM

We are currently helping guests with planned arrivals between now and early May. Those with reservations scheduled to arrive at the end of May and later should continue to monitor our latest bulletins. This is a unique situation that is still fluid, still dynamic. At this time, we do not know when these restrictions might end.

Guests with reservations arriving

  • Now through May 15, 2020: Call our office (252) 457-1100 to discuss options for your reservation or if you have already spoken to us but have additional questions as things change.
  • May 16, 2020 and later: If possible, please wait to contact us. It is too early to tell if your reservation will be affected by the current travel restrictions on the Outer Banks. Please continue to check our bulletin for updates

Stay tuned to official county websites for the most up to date and accurate information:

Read more on our blog post. We will continue to post bulletins and updates on social media as information becomes available.

Bulletin #5: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Friday, March 20, 2020 9:11 PM

Effective beginning 10pm this evening, Friday, March 20th, Dare and Currituck County will prohibit access to visitors and non-resident property owners.

Please continue to monitor official county websites for the more up to date information:

It is unknown when these restrictions for visitors and non-resident property owners will be lifted.

We are asking that guests call the office to discuss their impending reservations at (252) 457-1100. We continue to contact guests, focusing first on those scheduled to arrive now through early May. Please know we are doing our best to assist every guest as quickly as possible. Due to high call volume, we ask that those with reservations after May 15th please wait to contact us. If your matter is urgent, please do not hesitate to reach out. This is still a very fluid situation that is likely to change as the days and weeks progress.

We will continue to update Twiddy.com and our social media channels as new information becomes available.

Bulletin #4: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Friday, March 20, 2020 8:02 AM

Currituck County has joined Dare County in issuing an formal statement which restricts visitors from accessing the Outer Banks. Visitors to Currituck Outer Banks (Corolla and the 4x4 beaches) have not been permitted access since Dare County issued their restriction on March 17 as access to these areas is through Dare County. There is currently no information on when the travel restrictions will be lifted.

Please continue to monitor official county websites for the more up to date information:

Please continue to monitor official county websites for the more up to date information:

We are asking that guests call the office to discuss their impending reservations at (252) 457-1100. We continue to contact guests, focusing first on those scheduled to arrive now through early May. Please know we are doing our best to assist every guest as quickly as possible. Due to high call volume, we ask that those with reservations after May 15th please wait to contact us. If your matter is urgent, please do not hesitate to reach out. This is still a very fluid situation that is likely to change as the days and weeks progress.

We will continue to update Twiddy.com and our social media channels as new information becomes available.

Bulletin #3: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Wednesday, March 18, 2020 5:43 PM

Access to the Outer Banks is still restricted to residents and property owners only. Dare County has not posted any information on when these restrictions will be lifted at this time. Please follow official county websites for updates:

We are asking that guests call the office to discuss their impending reservations at (252) 457-1100. We are also in the process of contacting guests, focusing first on those scheduled to arrive now through early May. Please know we are doing our best to assist every guest as quickly as possible. Due to high call volume, we ask that those with reservations after May 15th please wait to contact us. If your matter is urgent, please do not hesitate to reach out. This is still a very fluid situation that is likely to change as the days and weeks progress.

We will continue to update Twiddy.com and our social media channels as new information becomes available.

Bulletin #2: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Wednesday, March 18, 2020 9:01 AM

The Dare County Control Group has made the decision to restrict visitor access to Dare County beginning Tuesday, March 17, at 2:00 p.m. Checkpoints have been established at entry points to Dare County and no visitors will be allowed access. Please visit Dare County’s website for the most up to date information. This also restricts access to Corolla and the 4x4 beaches as entry is dependent on travel through Dare County. Please visit Currituck County’s website for more information.

While the travel restriction is in effect, only residents of the Outer Banks are permitted to enter Dare County. Currently, we do not have information on when the restriction will lift. Alabama can t keep a good man down are monitoring the situation closely and will alert guests once we learn more. 

Guests who are currently in-house are currently not required to leave, but will not be permitted access back into Dare County should they leave and try to return. Also be aware the Governor has issued an executive order effective at 5:00 p.m. March 17 stating all North Carolina restaurants and bars will be closed to dine-in customers. Takeout and delivery orders can continue.

Travel Insurance related questions should be directed to Generali Global Assistance directly at (866) 999-4018 or visit their website (plan code G-332CSA).

For guests with concerns about an upcoming reservation, please contact our office 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. You may experience extended hold times, but please know we are doing our best to assist every guest as quickly as possible. This is a rapidly evolving situation. We will continue to update Twiddy.com and our social media channels as new information becomes available. 

Bulletin #1: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Tuesday, March 17, 2020 1:59 PM

Dare County will restrict access to visitors begining today, March 17 at 2:00PM.

Message from Dare County:
In response to chase bank warren mi guidelines from the CDC to avoid discretionary travel and follow the The President’s Coronavirus Guidelines for America, the Dare County Control Group has made the decision to restrict visitor access to Dare County beginning today, Tuesday, March 17 at 2:00 p.m. Beginning at 2:00 p.m., checkpoints will be established at entry points to Dare County and no visitors will be allowed access. Permanent residents, non-resident property owners and non-resident employees of Dare County businesses may review entry guidelines at www.darenc.com/entry. Staff is working to activate the online permitting system by 1:00 p.m

Please visit Dare County's website for the most up to date information: https://www.darenc.com/departments/health-human-services/coronavirus.

All travel insurance questions should be directed to Generali (plan code G-332CSA). Click here for more information.

This is a rapidly evolving situation words their way spelling lists 1st grade we will share updates as quickly as possible as they become available.

Enjoy the Outer Banks from Home

We know that taking a vacation is important and, let's be honest, we could all use one right about now. Until you can visit in person again, we have put together a collection of videos, blogs, and more help you relax and soak in the sights and sounds of the Outer Banks right from home.

Serenity Videos OBX

Sunrise on the OBX

COMING SOON

Outer Banks Sunset
Источник: https://www.twiddy.com/our-response-to-coronavirus/

Outer Banks

Starkweather, Sarah. 2012. "Outer Banks 4 - Roanoke Island" Online at FlickrThe Outer Banks are a chain of barrier islands that skirt the coast of North Carolina from the Virginia border to Cape Lookout through Currituck, Dare, Hyde, and Carteret Counties. More than 175 miles long, they are separated as much as 30 miles from the mainland by a series of shallow sounds. Pamlico Sound, the largest sound on the East Coast of the United States (and some say the world's largest), is 80 miles long and 15 to 30 miles wide. It is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a part of the Outer Banks and drains into the Atlantic Ocean through Hatteras and Ocracoke Inlets. Albemarle Sound, the second largest (some 50 miles long and 5 to 14 miles are the outer banks open, was named after George Monck, duke of Albemarle, one of the Lords Proprietors of the Carolina colony. The state's first permanent settlements were made along its northern shore. Other North Carolina sounds include Core Sound, Croatan Sound, Currituck Sound, and Roanoke Sound.

The topography of the Outer Banks is constantly changing, as inlets open and close and beaches narrow and widen. Windswept and remote, the islands were sparsely populated until the paving of roads, the construction of bridges such as the Herbert Bonner Bridge in the 1960s, and the institution of large-scale ferry service between Ocracoke and the mainland and Ocracoke and Hatteras islands. Once largely uninhabited except for small villages, the Outer Banks are now a popular tourist destination and the permanent home of increasing numbers of residents.

The first inhabitants of the Outer Banks were Native Americans. Many place names, such as Hatteras, Ocracoke, Kinnakeet, Chicamacomico, Manteo, and Wanchese, bear testimony to these early residents. Native Americans on Hatteras Island befriended explorers Philip Amadas and Arthur Barlowe in their reconnaissance mission for Sir Walter Raleigh. Conflicts with Europeans, combined most likely with disease, led to the virtual disappearance of Native American tribes on the Outer Banks by the seventeenth century.

During the colonial period, European settlement on most of the Outer Banks was sparse. After the English failed to establish a permanent settlement at Roanoke Island in the 1580s, few Europeans showed interest in the Outer Banks for the next century and zaxbys free food today. In the eighteenth century, probably the most strategic and most heavily populated area of the Outer Banks centered around the islands of Ocracoke and Portsmouth, where colonial shipping found entrance into the southern Pamlico Sound and on to coastal towns like Bath. The inlets and isolation made the Banks attractive to pirates and smugglers; famed pirate Blackbeard (Edward Teach) met his death in the sound waters off Ocracoke, one of his bases of operation. The importance of this part of the Outer Banks to shipping and travel can be seen later as well, in the construction during the early national period of the Ocracoke Lighthouse, operational in 1819.

During the nineteenth century, the Outer Banks remained remote, physically and culturally isolated from mainland North Carolina. Generally removed from the mainstream, Outer Bankers lived a subsistence lifestyle that combined fishing, the salvaging of shipwrecks, piloting of vessels through inlets, and waterfowl hunting. A distinctive English dialect, called the Ocracoke brogue-featuring the unusual pronunciation of the vowel "i" as "oy," leading to the nickname "Hoi Toiders" for those who speak it-developed and remains as a reminder of the remoteness of past Outer Banks communities. Among the affluent planters of the Albemarle, the custom evolved of vacationing in summer at locations such as Nags Head. Nevertheless, the islands remained largely untouched by outside influences.

During the Civil War, occupation of the various inlets along the Outer Banks made the remote islands strategically important to both the Confederacy and the Union. The latter succeeded in occupying the islands throughout most of the war.

Changes in technology, transportation, and economy began to affect the Outer Banks in the late nineteenth century. The construction of the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal by 1859 connected the upper banks with the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. After the Civil War, the canal became integral in the development of new economies on the Outer Banks. A shift from subsistence living to commercial fishing and oystering occurred, as the lives of people on the Outer Banks became intertwined with regional and national market needs and trends. The are the outer banks open presence of summer visitors at places such as Nags Head and the arrival of sport waterfowl hunters each fall along the length of the Outer Banks also marked the latter part of the nineteenth century.

In the early twentieth century, the Outer Banks began to feel the pull of mainstream life, and their windswept beaches and dunes earned them a place in history. From January 1901 to August 1902, Reginald A. Fessenden succeeded in sending wireless messages from a tower on Roanoke Island to Cape Hatteras and to Cape Henry, Va. He also received musical notes transmitted from Cape Hatteras. On 17 Dec. 1903, Wilbur and Orville Wright flew an experimental motor-driven airplane for 12 seconds at Kitty Hawk, changing transportation forever. Two world wars brought submarine warfare to the coast of the Outer Banks, especially in the waters off Hatteras Island.

The advent of the affordable automobile combined with the paving of wicked tuna outer banks full episodes, especially U.S. 12 on Bodie, Hatteras, and Ocracoke Islands, began to transform the Outer Banks in the 1920s and 1930s. Federal New Deal funds allowed for road paving and dune stabilization, and large tracts of land were designated in 1937 for the creation of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. This was followed just before World War II by the creation of the Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge.

Although regions of the Outer Banks have remained among the least developed stretches of seashore on the Atlantic coast of the United States, increasing tourism and contact with the outside world has led to tremendous development in the area. Approximately 7 million visitors from around the world stay for short or extended periods in the Outer Banks, enjoying ocean activities such as swimming, hang gliding, fishing, windsurfing, and bird watching as well as cultural activities. The Outer Banks History Center in Manteo has thousands of manuscripts, pamphlets, photographs, maps, paintings, and other items related to the history of the area. Population growth in the Outer Banks has been approximately double the North Carolina average. By 2004 the year-round population of the banks had increased to more than 45,000 people, creating great demand for new housing, particularly in the northern areas.

References:

John Alexander and James Lazell, Ribbon of Sand: The Amazing Convergence of the Ocean and the Outer Banks (2000).

Rodney Barfield, Seasoned by Salt: A Historical Album of the Outer Banks (1995).

Dirk Frankenberg, The Nature of the Outer Banks: Environmental Processes, Field Sites, and Development Issues, Corolla to Ocracoke (1995).

Thomas J. Schoenbaum, Islands, Capes, and Sounds: The North Carolina Coast (repr., 1988).

David Stick, The Outer Banks of North Carolina, 1584-1958 (1958).

Stick, An Outer Banks Reader (1998).

Additional Resources:

"With a quaintness born of history, the sister barrier islands," Our State, June 1999. http://digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/ref/collection/p16062coll18/id/67897

Image credits:

Starkweather, Sarah. 2012. "Outer Banks 4 - Roanoke Island." Online at Flickr at https://www.flickr.com/photos/sarah1rene/7250632648/. Accessed 6/28/2012.

 

Источник: https://www.ncpedia.org/outer-banks

Things are getting much closer to pre-pandemic normals in North Carolina. With North Carolina’s COVID numbers continuing to show improvement and vaccine distribution increasing, N.C. Governor Roy Cooper has eliminated social distancing requirements in all settings, lifted the state's mask mandate outdoors for all people and lifted the mandate indoors for vaccinated people in most settings. All businesses can operate at 100 percent capacity. Details on Executive Order 215, which took effect Friday, May 14, can be found here.

Face coverings and masks are still recommended for unvaccinated people and for all people in large venues. Because most children are still unvaccinated and can spread COVID-19, the state recommends masks in child care, day camp and overnight camp settings. Masks are also recommended in some healthcare settings, airports and corrections facilities.

Employers, businesses owner and local governments are free to enact their own mask requirements, and some local businesses are not ready to eliminate the mask requirement. Keep your mask handy for now, just in case you are asked to wear it.

Be aware that the number of positive COVID-19 cases in Dare County is very low but not zero. Continue to wash or sanitize your hands frequently, wear a mask if you're in a large, crowded area and wear a mask if you are unvaccinated.

Photo: Businesses can now be open at 100% capacity, and mask requirements have been lifted in most cases. We'll be seeing many more smiling faces, as seen here at The Blue Point's backBar, courtesy Facebook.

Gatherings

Social distancing requirements have been lifted, and gatherings of any size are allowed. 

Restaurants & Bars

Restaurants and bars can resume business as usual at 100% capacity.

Retail Businesses

Outer Banks stores can operate at 100% capacity. Some businesses may still require customers to wear a mask, so be prepared.

Things to Do

Social distancing requirements have been lifted, so all pools, museums, attractions and parks can operate at 100% capacity. Some facilities may request that you wear a mask.

Events

Daytime and nightlife events, including live music, are rapidly returning. Check our Daytime and Nightlife listings for event information.

Have fun out there!

Источник: https://outerbanksthisweek.com/blog/outer-banks-covid-19-update-what-expect

This site, OuterBanksThisWeek.com, is the closest you can get to being on the Outer Banks, NC, without actually being here. Here, in the words of locals who know this place inside and out, you’ll find the detailed information you need to really know the Outer Banks. Want information on Outer Banks Nightlife while you’re here? We’ve got it – who’s playing where, what play is being performed, what well-known touring group is here, Outer Banks music and musicians you really should hear. Want to know about local events and happenings, such as annual events, specialty events or seasonal events? Dive in here; we’ve got it all. Other Outer Banks, NC, things to do are here too, such as scheduled programs at major attractions or recreational activities that happen every week. Plenty of other things to do are also here on the Outer Banks. While you’re visiting the Outer Banks, NC, we know you’ll plan on enjoying some restaurants too. You’ll find information such as daily specials, complete contact info, where you need a reservation or where you can bring large parties more easily. And, you’ll appreciate the hundreds of coupons you can download from this site that will make it cheaper to dine, shop and enjoy the great outdoors at hot spots on the Outer Banks. Speaking of the great outdoors, Outer Banks, NC, fishing enthusiasts will look to this site every day for information on what’s being caught, where to go to catch it, what trophies the offshore boats are bringing in and more. And, finally, the only sport more popular than fishing is probably Outer Banks shopping … yes, it’s a sport in many people’s eyes! Through Outer Banks This Week, you’ll learn where the great sales are located, connect with individual shops to get a sneak preview of what they offer before you go and see highlights of the latest and greatest new inventory.

If you want to be a member of the Outer Banks, you need to use OuterBanksThisWeek.com. Don’t miss a thing that’s happening while you’re here!

9 Ways to Get Merry on the Outer Banks

The Outer Banks is a fun place to be during the holiday season. If you’re looking to entertain your family and gather with friends, here are nine ways to get a shot of the holiday spirit. WinterLights Through January 16 Holiday magic is alive and well at The Elizabethan Are the outer banks open. This event is a true crowd pleaser, and only the grinchiest of Grinches would not enjoy bundling up and strolling through the 10 acres of gardens that are billie eilish stop looking at my d sweatpants with millions of lights and. Read More

Top Picks

Top Picks: Nightlife

Logo for Elizabethan Gardens

WinterLights 2021

Elizabethan Gardens

Roanoke Island

Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm

Elizabethan Gardens, WinterLights 2021
Logo for Elizabethan Gardens

WinterLights 2021

Elizabethan Gardens

Roanoke Island

Wednesday, December 8, 2021 - 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm

Elizabethan Gardens, WinterLights 2021
Logo for Elizabethan Gardens

WinterLights 2021

Elizabethan Gardens

Roanoke Island

Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm

Elizabethan Gardens, WinterLights 2021
Logo for Outer Banks Brewing Station

Trivia Night

Outer Banks Brewing Station

Kill Devil Hills

Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 9:30 pm

Outer Banks Brewing Station, Trivia Night
Logo for Elizabethan Gardens

WinterLights 2021

Elizabethan Gardens

Roanoke Island

Friday, December 10, 2021 - 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm

Elizabethan Gardens, WinterLights 2021
Logo for Outer Banks Brewing Station

DJ Gustavo

Outer Banks Brewing Station

Kill Devil Hills

Friday, December 10, 2021 - 10:00 pm to Saturday, December 11, 2021 - 2:00 am

Outer Banks Brewing Station, DJ Gustavo

Top Picks: Daytime Entertainment & Special Events

Logo for Dare County Arts Council

Rob Snyder Exhibit

Dare County Arts Council

Manteo

Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

Dare County Arts Council, Rob Snyder Exhibit
Logo for Ocracoke Preservation Society

Annual Wassail Party

Ocracoke Preservation Society

Ocracoke

Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm

Ocracoke Preservation Society, Annual Wassail Party
Logo for Dare County Arts Council

Rob Snyder Exhibit

Dare County Arts Council

Manteo

Wednesday, December 8, 2021 - 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

Dare County Arts Council, Rob Snyder Exhibit
Logo for Dare County Arts Council

Rob Snyder Exhibit

Dare County Arts Council

Manteo

Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

Dare County Arts Council, Rob Snyder Exhibit
Logo for Dare County Arts Council

Rob Snyder Exhibit

Dare County Arts Council

Manteo

Friday, December 10, 2021 - 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

Dare County Arts Council, Rob Snyder Exhibit

Top Picks: Great Plates

OuterBanksThisWeek.com Magazine Articles

View All Articles

Источник: https://outerbanksthisweek.com/

Are the outer banks open -

Outer Banks

Starkweather, Sarah. 2012. "Outer Banks 4 - Roanoke Island" Online at FlickrThe Outer Banks are a chain of barrier islands that skirt the coast of North Carolina from the Virginia border to Cape Lookout through Currituck, Dare, Hyde, and Carteret Counties. More than 175 miles long, they are separated as much as 30 miles from the mainland by a series of shallow sounds. Pamlico Sound, the largest sound on the East Coast of the United States (and some say the world's largest), is 80 miles long and 15 to 30 miles wide. It is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a part of the Outer Banks and drains into the Atlantic Ocean through Hatteras and Ocracoke Inlets. Albemarle Sound, the second largest (some 50 miles long and 5 to 14 miles wide), was named after George Monck, duke of Albemarle, one of the Lords Proprietors of the Carolina colony. The state's first permanent settlements were made along its northern shore. Other North Carolina sounds include Core Sound, Croatan Sound, Currituck Sound, and Roanoke Sound.

The topography of the Outer Banks is constantly changing, as inlets open and close and beaches narrow and widen. Windswept and remote, the islands were sparsely populated until the paving of roads, the construction of bridges such as the Herbert Bonner Bridge in the 1960s, and the institution of large-scale ferry service between Ocracoke and the mainland and Ocracoke and Hatteras islands. Once largely uninhabited except for small villages, the Outer Banks are now a popular tourist destination and the permanent home of increasing numbers of residents.

The first inhabitants of the Outer Banks were Native Americans. Many place names, such as Hatteras, Ocracoke, Kinnakeet, Chicamacomico, Manteo, and Wanchese, bear testimony to these early residents. Native Americans on Hatteras Island befriended explorers Philip Amadas and Arthur Barlowe in their reconnaissance mission for Sir Walter Raleigh. Conflicts with Europeans, combined most likely with disease, led to the virtual disappearance of Native American tribes on the Outer Banks by the seventeenth century.

During the colonial period, European settlement on most of the Outer Banks was sparse. After the English failed to establish a permanent settlement at Roanoke Island in the 1580s, few Europeans showed interest in the Outer Banks for the next century and more. In the eighteenth century, probably the most strategic and most heavily populated area of the Outer Banks centered around the islands of Ocracoke and Portsmouth, where colonial shipping found entrance into the southern Pamlico Sound and on to coastal towns like Bath. The inlets and isolation made the Banks attractive to pirates and smugglers; famed pirate Blackbeard (Edward Teach) met his death in the sound waters off Ocracoke, one of his bases of operation. The importance of this part of the Outer Banks to shipping and travel can be seen later as well, in the construction during the early national period of the Ocracoke Lighthouse, operational in 1819.

During the nineteenth century, the Outer Banks remained remote, physically and culturally isolated from mainland North Carolina. Generally removed from the mainstream, Outer Bankers lived a subsistence lifestyle that combined fishing, the salvaging of shipwrecks, piloting of vessels through inlets, and waterfowl hunting. A distinctive English dialect, called the Ocracoke brogue-featuring the unusual pronunciation of the vowel "i" as "oy," leading to the nickname "Hoi Toiders" for those who speak it-developed and remains as a reminder of the remoteness of past Outer Banks communities. Among the affluent planters of the Albemarle, the custom evolved of vacationing in summer at locations such as Nags Head. Nevertheless, the islands remained largely untouched by outside influences.

During the Civil War, occupation of the various inlets along the Outer Banks made the remote islands strategically important to both the Confederacy and the Union. The latter succeeded in occupying the islands throughout most of the war.

Changes in technology, transportation, and economy began to affect the Outer Banks in the late nineteenth century. The construction of the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal by 1859 connected the upper banks with the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. After the Civil War, the canal became integral in the development of new economies on the Outer Banks. A shift from subsistence living to commercial fishing and oystering occurred, as the lives of people on the Outer Banks became intertwined with regional and national market needs and trends. The increasing presence of summer visitors at places such as Nags Head and the arrival of sport waterfowl hunters each fall along the length of the Outer Banks also marked the latter part of the nineteenth century.

In the early twentieth century, the Outer Banks began to feel the pull of mainstream life, and their windswept beaches and dunes earned them a place in history. From January 1901 to August 1902, Reginald A. Fessenden succeeded in sending wireless messages from a tower on Roanoke Island to Cape Hatteras and to Cape Henry, Va. He also received musical notes transmitted from Cape Hatteras. On 17 Dec. 1903, Wilbur and Orville Wright flew an experimental motor-driven airplane for 12 seconds at Kitty Hawk, changing transportation forever. Two world wars brought submarine warfare to the coast of the Outer Banks, especially in the waters off Hatteras Island.

The advent of the affordable automobile combined with the paving of roads, especially U.S. 12 on Bodie, Hatteras, and Ocracoke Islands, began to transform the Outer Banks in the 1920s and 1930s. Federal New Deal funds allowed for road paving and dune stabilization, and large tracts of land were designated in 1937 for the creation of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. This was followed just before World War II by the creation of the Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge.

Although regions of the Outer Banks have remained among the least developed stretches of seashore on the Atlantic coast of the United States, increasing tourism and contact with the outside world has led to tremendous development in the area. Approximately 7 million visitors from around the world stay for short or extended periods in the Outer Banks, enjoying ocean activities such as swimming, hang gliding, fishing, windsurfing, and bird watching as well as cultural activities. The Outer Banks History Center in Manteo has thousands of manuscripts, pamphlets, photographs, maps, paintings, and other items related to the history of the area. Population growth in the Outer Banks has been approximately double the North Carolina average. By 2004 the year-round population of the banks had increased to more than 45,000 people, creating great demand for new housing, particularly in the northern areas.

References:

John Alexander and James Lazell, Ribbon of Sand: The Amazing Convergence of the Ocean and the Outer Banks (2000).

Rodney Barfield, Seasoned by Salt: A Historical Album of the Outer Banks (1995).

Dirk Frankenberg, The Nature of the Outer Banks: Environmental Processes, Field Sites, and Development Issues, Corolla to Ocracoke (1995).

Thomas J. Schoenbaum, Islands, Capes, and Sounds: The North Carolina Coast (repr., 1988).

David Stick, The Outer Banks of North Carolina, 1584-1958 (1958).

Stick, An Outer Banks Reader (1998).

Additional Resources:

"With a quaintness born of history, the sister barrier islands," Our State, June 1999. http://digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/ref/collection/p16062coll18/id/67897

Image credits:

Starkweather, Sarah. 2012. "Outer Banks 4 - Roanoke Island." Online at Flickr at https://www.flickr.com/photos/sarah1rene/7250632648/. Accessed 6/28/2012.

 

Источник: https://www.ncpedia.org/outer-banks

Jockey's Ridge State Park

Jockey's Ridge State Park
Current status of park facilities   

The main park entrance and dune are open from 8:00am to 6:00pm. The Soundside access and swim beach are open from 8:00am to 5:00pm. Please be advised that the parking lot at our Soundside Access fills up very quickly. We recommend arriving as early as possible as the parking lot is the only designated area where you may park to enjoy our Soundside beach area. You may be ticketed or towed if you park along Soundside Road or in any other undesignated area. Please look for alternative access sites such as those located on the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. 

After 27 years, our Visitors’ Center is being renovated! Please excuse our appearance while we are remodeling. From May 24, 2021 until April 2022, the Visitors’ Center will be closed to the public. However, the Park, the public restroom building located near the Visitors’ Center, and the Soundside Access will be open during normal operating hours. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Trails and restrooms at both park accesses are open. Please follow the 3-Ws and any posted guidelines. 

With 24-hour advance notice, and dependent upon weather and ranger availability, we are offering dune rides to visitors with mobility restrictions on a limited basis, please call the park for more details. 

When visiting, please follow the North Carolina State Parks Guidelines listed above. 

Please monitor this page for additional information.

 Last updated on: Monday, November 1, 2021

Map of North Carolina – Jockey's Ridge State Park


Contact the park

252-441-7132

[email protected]

Addresses

Visitor center

300 W. Carolista Drive
Nags Head, NC 27959

GPS: 35.9642, -75.6330

Soundside access

330 W. Soundside Road
Nags Head, NC 27959

GPS: 35.9525, -75.6320

Hours

► 

  • November to February:
    8:00am to 6:00pm
  • March to April:
    8:00am to 8:00pm
  • May to September:
    8:00am to 9:00pm
  • October:
    8:00am to 7:00pm
  • Closed Christmas Day

► 

► 

  • The park visitor center is currently under construction for renovations and is CLOSED until next spring.
  • October to March:
    9:00am to 5:00pm
  • April to September:
    9:00am to 6:00pm
  • Closed Christmas Day

The tallest living sand dune on the Atlantic coast is a premier location for kites, sightseeing and sunsets, with a view arcing from the ocean to Roanoke Sound. A visitor center with museum and 360-foot boardwalk with exhibits explain the dune’s ecology and are a gradual entry to the massive dune field. Hang gliding lessons are available through a vendor in the park. Experienced hang gliders must have a current USHPA membership and get a flying permit at the visitor center. Shoes and sun protection are recommended. By calling ahead a minimum of 24 hours in advance, visitors with mobility restrictions can request a ride between 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. or 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. in our all-terrain-vehicle to the top of the dunes. Rides will take approximately 30 to 45 minutes and availability will depend on weather and staff availability. The soundside access of the park is a different experience offering sunbathing, wading, paddling, and a one-mile nature trail that opens onto wetlands, grassy dunes and maritime thickets.


Reservations

Find and book a picnic shelter online

Or make your reservation at 1-877-722-6762


Notices and alerts

GPS issue

Some online maps and GPS systems do not provide accurate directions to the park.

To get directions, please enter the park's address, 300 W. Carolista Drive, Nags Head, NC 27959, or the GPS coordinates.

Using "Jockey's Ridge" to search for directions may take you to private property.


Current weather

27959 Nags Head, NC


Источник: https://www.ncparks.gov/jockeys-ridge-state-park/home

Outer Banks

Barrier islands in North Carolina, U.S.

For the 2020 TV series, see Outer Banks (TV series).

The Outer Banks, separating the Atlantic Ocean (east) from Currituck and Albemarle Sounds (north) and Pamlico Sound (south)

The Outer Banks (frequently abbreviated OBX) are a 200-mile (320 km) string of barrier islands and spits off the coast of North Carolina and southeastern Virginia, on the east coast of the United States. They line most of the North Carolina coastline, separating Currituck Sound, Albemarle Sound, and Pamlico Sound from the Atlantic Ocean. A major tourist destination, the Outer Banks are known for their wide expanse of open beachfront and the Cape Hatteras National Seashore.[1] The seashore and surrounding ecosystem are important biodiversity zones, including beach grasses and shrubland that help maintain the form of the land.

The Outer Banks were sites of early European settlement in the United States and remain important economic and cultural sites. Most notably the English Roanoke Colony vanished from Roanoke Island in 1587 and was the first location where an English person, Virginia Dare, was born in the Americas.[2] The hundreds of shipwrecks along the Outer Banks have given the surrounding seas the nickname Graveyard of the Atlantic. The Outer Banks were also home to the Wright brothers' first flight in a controlled, powered, heavier-than-air vehicle on December 17, 1903, at Kill Devil Hills.[3] During the 20th century the region became increasingly important for coastal tourism.

The Outer Banks are particularly vulnerable to sea level rise and coastal erosion, compounding existing coastal erosion caused by poor coastal management and construction practices.[4] In some locations on the banks, sea levels rose 5 inches from 2011 to 2015.[4] Some sections have significantly eroded already, with portions of Hatteras Island at 25% of its original width as of 2014.[5]Tropical storms like Hurricane Irene in 2011 have already destroyed significant infrastructure and property.[5]

Terminology[edit]

The term "Outer Banks" refers to the islands, shoals, and spits from Cape Lookout northward, including Core Banks, and is frequently abbreviated OBX on regional tourism marketing. In recent decades, the beaches to the south of Cape Lookout have been marketing themselves as the "Southern Outer Banks", including the marketing as SOBX; this region includes the Crystal Coast beaches of Bogue Banks. The term Inner Banks and IBX is a similarly new term to refer to the mainland communities along Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds.

Geography[edit]

The Outer Banks is a string of peninsulas and barrier islands separating the Atlantic Ocean from mainland North Carolina. From north to south, the largest of these include: Bodie Island (which used to be an island but is now a peninsula due to tropical storms and hurricanes that closed inlets that separated it from the Currituck Banks), Pea Island (which has, at times, been contiguous with neighboring Bodie Island or Hatteras Island), Hatteras Island, Ocracoke Island, Portsmouth Island, and the Core Banks.[6] Over time, the exact number of islands and inlets changes as new inlets are opened up, often during a breach created during violent storms, and older inlets close, usually due to gradually shifting sands during the dynamic processes of beach evolution.

The Outer Banks stretch southward from Sandbridge in Virginia Beach down the North Carolina coastline. Sources differ regarding the southern terminus of the Outer Banks. The most extensive definition includes the state's three prominent capes: Cape Hatteras, Cape Lookout, and Cape Fear.[7][8] Other sources limit the definition to two capes (Cape Hatteras and Cape Lookout) and coastal areas in four counties (Currituck County, Dare County, Hyde County, and Carteret County).[9] Some authors exclude Carteret's Bogue Banks; others exclude the county entirely.[9][10][11]

The northern part of the Outer Banks, from Oregon Inlet northward, is actually a part of the North American mainland, since the northern inlets of Bodie Island and Currituck Banks no longer exist.[12] It is separated by the Currituck Sound and the Intracoastal Waterway, which passes through the Great Dismal Swamp occupying much of the mainland west of the Outer Banks. Road access to the northern Outer Banks is cut off between Sandbridge and Corolla, North Carolina, with communities such as Carova Beach accessible only by four-wheel drive vehicles. North Carolina State Highway 12 links most of the popular Outer Banks communities in this section of the coast. The easternmost point is Rodanthe Pier in Rodanthe, NC .

Aerial view of Outer banks (looking north), with sound on the left and ocean on the right

The Outer Banks are not anchored to offshore coral reefs like some other barrier islands, and as a consequence, they often suffer significant beach erosion during major storms. In fact, their location jutting out into the Atlantic makes them the most hurricane-prone area north of Florida, for both landfalling storms and brushing storms offshore. Hatteras Island was cut in half on September 18, 2003, when Hurricane Isabel washed a 2,000 feet (600 m) wide and 15 feet (5 m) deep channel called Isabel Inlet through the community of Hatteras Village on the southern end of the island.[13] The tear was subsequently repaired and restored by sand dredging by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It was cut off once again in 2011 by Hurricane Irene. Access to the island was largely limited to boat access only from August to late October until another temporary bridge could be built.

Three state highway bridges connect the Outer Banks to the mainland, the Wright Memorial Bridge, the oldest (built in 1930, rehabilitated in 1966), carries US 158 between Point Harbor and Kitty Hawk. William B. Umstead Bridge, the second oldest (built in 1957, rehabilitated in 1966), carries US 64 between Manns Harbor on the mainland and Manteo on Roanoke Island. The newest bridge, the Virginia Dare Memorial Bridge, was completed in 2002 and carries US 64 Bypass between Manns Harbor and Roanoke Island between Manteo and Wanchese. The Melvin R. Daniels Bridge carries US 64 between Roanoke Island and Nags Head. At Whalebone Junction, the three main highways of the Outer Banks (NC 12, US 158, and US 64) all meet. Additionally, NC 615 serves as the main route along Knotts Island in the extreme north; it connects only to Virginia by land.

A number of ferries maintained by the North Carolina Department of Transportation Ferry Division also serve the Outer Banks. From north to south, these are the Knotts Island-Currituck Ferry, the Hatteras-Ocracoke Ferry, the Swan Quarter-Ocracoke Ferry, and the Cedar Island-Ocracoke Ferry. Additionally, a semi-regular emergency ferry often runs from Stumpy Point to Rodanthe to serve travelers due to frequent wash-outs of NC 12 between Nags Head and Rodanthe. Additionally, private ferries are commissioned by the National Park Service to access certain islands within the National Seashores along the outer banks, these include ferries to Portsmouth Island, to Cape Lookout Lighthouse, and various locations along Core Banks and Shackleford Banks.

Ecology[edit]

Vegetation[edit]

The vegetation of the Outer Banks has biodiversity, although it is considered the northern limit for many southern plants such as wild scrub palms. In the northern part of the Outer Banks, from Virginia Beach southward past the North Carolina border to Cape Hatteras, the main types of vegetation are sea grasses, beach grasses and other beach plants including Opuntia humifusa on the Atlantic side and wax myrtles, bays, and grasses on the Sound side with areas of pine and Spanish moss-covered live oaks. Yucca aloifolia and Yucca gloriosa can be found growing wild here in the northern parts of its range on the beach. Dwarf palmettos were once indigenous to the entire Outer Banks, and they are still successfully planted and grown. Its current most northerly known native stand is on Monkey Island in Currituck County.[14][15]

From Cape Hatteras National Seashore southward, the vegetation does include dwarf palmetto (Sabal minor), Yucca aloifolia and Yucca gloriosa; however, the area also has Cabbage palmetto (Sabal palmetto), which can be found in the north, although they are native in the southern part of the Outer Banks, specifically prevalent from Cape Hatteras and all points southward. Pindo palms and windmill palms are also planted widely throughout the Outer Banks; although, they are not indigenous to the area.

A wide variety of native plants can be found at the Elizabethan Gardens in Manteo on Roanoke Island.[16]

The Outer Banks are home to Yaupon Holly (Ilex vomitoria), the roasted leaves of which were brewed into a high caffeine beverage called black drink by the Native Americans. The Outer Banks may be one of the few places where it is still consumed.[17]

Animal life[edit]

The islands are home to herds of feral horses, sometimes called "banker ponies", which according to local legend are descended from Spanish mustangs washed ashore centuries ago in shipwrecks. Populations are found on Ocracoke Island, Shackleford Banks, Currituck Banks, and in the Rachel Carson Estuarine Sanctuary.

Climate[edit]

The Outer Banks has a humid subtropical climate (Cfa). The outer banks have unusual weather patterns because of their unique geographical location. As the islands jut out from the eastern seaboard into the Atlantic Gulf Stream, the Outer Banks has a predisposition to be affected by hurricanes, Nor'easters (usually in the form of rain, and rarely snow or mixed precipitation), and other ocean-driven storms. The hardiness zone is 8b.

The winters are typically milder than in inland areas, averaging lows in the upper 30s and highs in the lower 50s, and are more frequently overcast than in the summer. However, the exposure of the Outer Banks makes them prone to higher winds, often causing wind chills to make the apparent temperature as cold as the inland areas. The summer months average lows from the mid-70s to highs in the upper 80s, depending on the time of the summer. The spring and fall are typically milder seasons. The fall and winter are usually warmer than areas inland, while the spring and the summer are often slightly cooler because of the moderating effects of being surrounded by water.

Although snow is possible, averaging from 3 inches in the north to less than 1/2 inch per year in the south, there are many times when years pass between snowfalls.[18] The majority of nor'easters are "born" off the coasts of the Outer Banks.

History[edit]

The Outer Banks is one of the most culturally distinctive areas of the East Coast of the United States.[19] The Outer Banks were inhabited before the arrival of Europeans, with small branches of larger tribes, such as the Algonquin speaking Chowanoke, Secotan and Poteskeet living semi-nomadic lives. Oftentimes Native Americans would use the barrier islands facing the Atlantic Ocean for fishing in the summer, and reside on Roanoke Island or the North Carolina mainland in the winter.

European explorers to the Outer Banks as far back as the 1500s noted encountering the friendly Hatteras Island and Outer Banks Natives, noting their hospitality to foreign explorers as well as their happiness and overall quality of life. European-borne diseases and migration to the mainland were likely the main causes for the decline of the Native population.[20]

Before bridges were built in the 1930s, the only form of transport between or off the islands was by boat, which allowed for the islands to stay isolated from much of the rest of the mainland. This helped to preserve the maritime culture and the distinctive Outer Banks accent or brogue, which sounds more like an English accent than it does an American accent. Many "bankers" have often been mistaken for being from England or Ireland when traveling to areas outside of the Outer Banks. The brogue is more distinctive the further south one travels on the Outer Banks, with it being the thickest on Ocracoke Island and Harkers Island.

Some residents of the Outer Banks, known as wreckers, made part of their living by scavenging wrecked ships—or by luring ships to their destruction. Horses with lanterns tied to their necks would be walked along the beach; the lanterns' up and down motion would appear to ships to represent clear water and a ship ahead; the unsuspecting captain would then drive his ship ashore following this false light.[21]Ocracoke was the last refuge of pirate Edward Teach, better known as Blackbeard. It is also where the infamous pirate was killed November 22, 1718, in a fierce battle with troops from Virginia.[22]

Economy[edit]

Major industries of the region include commercial fishing, boat building and tourism. Since the 1990s, the rise of tourism has led the region to become an increasingly service-oriented economy.

Maritime industries[edit]

There has been a long history of fishing in the Outer Banks, dating back to the end of the 17th century.[23]Pirates ravaged the coast for the majority of the 1600s, but once they were ridden, the local settlers used fishing as their lifeline.[23]

In the mid-19th century, large-scale commercial fishing erupted, mostly due to the construction of the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal, which simplified shipping methods for fishermen.[23]Saltwater fishing became the cash-crop of the Outer Banks, and blossomed it into a popular tourist destination.[23] In modern times, tourists will flock to the area just for the abundance of fishing opportunities.[24] Anglers, otherwise known as fishermen, have a wide range of fishing methods, some of these methods date back to when the first settlers arrived, to choose from in the Outer Banks.[23]

Lighthouses[edit]

There are currently 6 lighthouses in the Outer Banks[25]

  • Currituck Beach Lighthouse, located in Corolla, North Carolina
  • Roanoake Marshes Lighthouse, located in Manteo, North Carolina
  • Bodie Island Lighthouse, located south of Nags Head, North Carolina
  • Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, located in Buxton, North Carolina
  • Ocracoke Island Lighthouse, located in Ocracoke, North Carolina
  • Cape Lookout Lighthouse, located in Carteret County, North Carolina

Communities[edit]

Towns and communities along the Outer Banks include (listed from north to south):

Currituck Banks[edit]

Bodie Island[edit]

Sunset over the Currituck Sound in Duck (2009)
The Bodie Island Lighthouse (October 2008)

Roanoke Island[edit]

Hatteras Island[edit]

Ocracoke Island[edit]

Core Banks[edit]

Bogue Banks[edit]

Parks[edit]

Jockey's Ridge State Park

[edit]

  • George Ackles (born 1967), professional basketball player[26]
  • Dennis Anderson (born 1960), professional Monster Truck driver and creator of Grave Digger
  • Marc Basnight (1947–2020), former member of the North Carolina State Senate
  • Emanuel Davis (born 1989), Canadian Football League defensive back[27]
  • Andy Griffith (1926–2012), actor[28]
  • Cathy Johnston-Forbes (born 1963), professional golfer[29]
  • Alexis Knapp (born 1989), actress
  • William Ivey Long (born 1947), costume designer for stage and film[30]
  • Edward Teach (1680–1718), notorious English pirate better known as "Blackbeard," raided on the North Atlantic and Caribbean Sea
  • Manteo (disappeared after 1587) influential figure in the Croatoan Nation, ambassador to England and mediator
  • Wanchese (disappeared after 1587) influential figure in the Roanoke Nation, opposed English colonization

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Campgrounds". Retrieved 1 April 2016.
  2. ^"England's First Home in the New World". Fort Raleigh National Historic Site. National Park Service.
  3. ^"Telegram from Orville Wright in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, to His Father Announcing Four Successful Flights, 1903 December 17". World Digital Library. 1903-12-17. Retrieved 2013-07-21.
  4. ^ ab"How the Outer Banks are Vanishing — and Leaving NC Defenseless Against Hurricanes". Carolina Political Review. Retrieved 2020-11-19.
  5. ^ abPEACH, SARA (July 24, 2014). "Rising Seas: Will the Outer Banks Survive?". National Geographic.
  6. ^"Geography of North Carolina". NC State Board of Education.
  7. ^"Geography of North Carolina". www.ncpublicschools.org. Retrieved 2016-04-09.
  8. ^"Library of Congress LCCN Permalink sh85096155". lccn.loc.gov. Retrieved 2016-04-10.
  9. ^ ab"North Carolina Gazetteer

    1st Annual Outer Banks Open sponsored by INNOVA

    About this tournament

    2019 1st Annual Outer Banks Open Sponsored by INNOVA

    Casey R. Logan Disc Golf Course
    Kill Devil Hills, NC 27948
    April 27, 2019

    This is a unsanctioned event.

    $30 All Recreational, Intermediate & Advanced divisions INCLUDES PLAYERS PACK valued at $30+ (trophy only payout for recreational, intermediate and advanced divisions) each player pack will include a tournament stamp Zephyr, knee saver Mini, erasable scorecard, stickers and your choice of a tournament stamp Champion Roadrunner or a tournament stamp Star Destroyer.
    $60 All Open divisions PLAYERS PACK NOT INCLUDED (cash & trophy payout for all open divisions)
    $2 Ace pot (optional)

    ALL NON-PRO DIVISIONS MUST REGISTER ONLINE BY Apil 18th TO RECEIVE A PLAYER PACK.

    8:00am - Registration/ sign in opens

    9:15am - Registration closes

    9:30am - Players meeting

    10:00am - 1st round start (18 holes from yellow tees to yellow baskets)

    Lunch - NOT included (1 hour)

    2nd round - start time TBD (18 holes from yellow tees to yellow baskets)

    Awards

    Refund policy

    You can receive a full refund up till 11:59pm April 25th. Zero refunds after. Matt Morrison is responsible for all refunds and cancellations.

    Источник: https://www.discgolfscene.com/tournament/Outer_Banks_Open_2019

    Is the Outer Banks beaches open?

    The Outer Banks now open to visitors!

    What is the curfew in Dare County?

    North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper’s new Modified Stay-at-Home Order, one that essentially imposes a curfew between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m., goes into effect on Friday, Dec.

    Is Hatteras Island closed to visitors?

    Both Cape Lookout and Cape Hatteras national seashores have remained open to visitors during the pandemic, though facilities including restrooms and camp grounds have been closed.

    What is the non emergency for Dare County NC?

    (252)

    What is the phone number for Dare County?

    Dare County, NCPHONE: FAX: HONE: FAX: HONE: FAX: HONE: FAX: HONE: FAX: HONE: FAX: HONE: FAX: HONE: FAX: ais 7 linhas

    How much does a Dare County Sheriff make?

    Average annual salary was $46,505 and median salary was $42,417. Dare County average salary is 1 percent lower than USA average and median salary is 2 percent lower than USA median.

    How much do teachers make in Dare County?

    WRAL News requested the salary data and ranked it, which showed that Dare County Schools has the top spot with an average teacher salary of $59,223 this school year.

    How much does a Dare County paramedic make?

    Initial salaries for Emergency Medical Technicians are about $24,000 to $29,000, while paramedics can start at a little over $32,000. This year, salaries were budgeted at $3.1 million and overtime at $1.4 million. At Monday’s Board of Commissioners meeting, two speakers expressed concerns about changes in scheduling.

    What is the Dare County School Boss program?

    (BOSS Program) Every employee in Dare County Schools receives a BOSS card for the duration of their employment. The BOSS card also entitles the employee to free admission to Dare County Schools athletic events.

    What is the pay scale for Dare County Schools?

    Average Salary for Dare County Schools EmployeesCustodian. $20k – $44k.Middle School Teacher. $37k – $73k.School Psychologist. $37k – $64k.

    Who is the Dare County staff?

    Main Switchboard: 252.475. 5000StaffTitlePhoneAnby, CherylClerk to the Board of Commissionersnders, RobertDeputy Sheriffnderson, CaitlinIncome Maintenance Caseworkernderson, GabeWTP Operator – Skycoais 16 linhas

    What high schools are in Dare County?

    First Flight High School. Kill Devil Hills, NC. Dare County Schools. #1in Dare County Schools Rankings. Manteo High School. Manteo, NC. Dare County Schools. #2in Dare County Schools Rankings. Cape Hatteras Secondary School. Buxton, NC. Dare County Schools. Dare Learning Academy. Manteo, NC. Dare County Schools.

    What is the Dare County Tax?

    The minimum combi sales tax rate for Dare County, North Carolina is 6.75%. This is the total of state and county sales tax rates. The North Carolina state sales tax rate is currently 4.75%. The Dare County sales tax rate is 2%.

    What are Dare County school lunches?

    Dare County Schools offers healthy meals every school day. Breakfast costs $1.25; lunch costs $2.75 in elementary and $3.00 in middle and high schools.

    Who is on the Dare County Board of Education?

    Board of EducationElected OfficialsBoard of EducationTerm EndsCarl Woody124 Raleigh Wood Dr. Manteo, NC argaret Lawler, Vice-Chairman81 Gravey Pond Lane Kitty Hawk ary Ellon Ballance, ChairmanPO Box 756 Hatteras oe TauberPO Kill Devil Hills ais 3 linhas

    Who is the Dare County Commissioners meeting?

    Meetings are generally held on the first Monday of the month at 9 a.m. and the third Monday of each month at 5 p.m. Occasionally this schedule is adjusted to accommodate holidays, and there are a few months each year when only one meeting is conducted.

    What is the Dare County Board of Education meetings?

    Board of Education Meeting Schedule DateTimeLocation of MeetingOctober 13, p.m.Kitty Hawk Elementary SchoolNovember 10, p.m.Manteo Elementary SchoolDecember 8, p.m.Manteo High SchoolJanuary 12, p.m.First Flight Elementary SchoolMais 6 linhas

    Where was Outer Banks filmed?

    Charleston

    Where is John B’s house in real life?

    The John B’s house pier is located in the Secessionville Historic District also in James Island, but if you are visiting the neighborhood, please respect the private properties of the area! The success of the series has caused a lot of trespassing that is very unwelcome for the owners.

    Why is Outer Banks not in Outer Banks?

    Outer Banks was not filmed in the actual Outer Banks. The show was originally intended to shoot in North Carolina, but showrunners moved it out of the state in response of the HB2 transgender bathroom bill. Instead, the show was filmed outside of Charleston, South Carolina.

    Источник: https://electroanswers.com/computer-hardware/is-the-outer-banks-beaches-open/
    are the outer banks open

    Are the outer banks open -

    Things are getting much closer to pre-pandemic normals in North Carolina. With North Carolina’s COVID numbers continuing to show improvement and vaccine distribution increasing, N.C. Governor Roy Cooper has eliminated social distancing requirements in all settings, lifted the state's mask mandate outdoors for all people and lifted the mandate indoors for vaccinated people in most settings. All businesses can operate at 100 percent capacity. Details on Executive Order 215, which took effect Friday, May 14, can be found here.

    Face coverings and masks are still recommended for unvaccinated people and for all people in large venues. Because most children are still unvaccinated and can spread COVID-19, the state recommends masks in child care, day camp and overnight camp settings. Masks are also recommended in some healthcare settings, airports and corrections facilities.

    Employers, businesses owner and local governments are free to enact their own mask requirements, and some local businesses are not ready to eliminate the mask requirement. Keep your mask handy for now, just in case you are asked to wear it.

    Be aware that the number of positive COVID-19 cases in Dare County is very low but not zero. Continue to wash or sanitize your hands frequently, wear a mask if you're in a large, crowded area and wear a mask if you are unvaccinated.

    Photo: Businesses can now be open at 100% capacity, and mask requirements have been lifted in most cases. We'll be seeing many more smiling faces, as seen here at The Blue Point's backBar, courtesy Facebook.

    Gatherings

    Social distancing requirements have been lifted, and gatherings of any size are allowed. 

    Restaurants & Bars

    Restaurants and bars can resume business as usual at 100% capacity.

    Retail Businesses

    Outer Banks stores can operate at 100% capacity. Some businesses may still require customers to wear a mask, so be prepared.

    Things to Do

    Social distancing requirements have been lifted, so all pools, museums, attractions and parks can operate at 100% capacity. Some facilities may request that you wear a mask.

    Events

    Daytime and nightlife events, including live music, are rapidly returning. Check our Daytime and Nightlife listings for event information.

    Have fun out there!

    Источник: https://outerbanksthisweek.com/blog/outer-banks-covid-19-update-what-expect
    island chain, United States". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 2016-04-10.
  10. ^"Corolla History". Retrieved 1 April 2016.
  11. ^"Shoring Up N. Carolina Islands: A Losing Battle?". Retrieved 1 April 2016.
  12. ^"Monkey Island Sabal Minor". Old Dominion University. Retrieved 1 November 2013.
  13. ^"Gary's Nursery". Gary Hollar. Retrieved 1 November 2013.
  14. ^"Elizabethan Gardens - Welcome to Our Lovely Gardens". Elizabethan Gardens. Retrieved 1 April 2016.
  15. ^Dough, Wynne. "Yaupon". NCpedia. Retrieved 24 January 2017.
  16. ^"Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge VA Weather Forecast". WillyWeather. Retrieved 3 September 2019.
  17. ^Wolfram, Walt; Reaser, Jeffrey (2014). Talkin' Tar Heel : How Our Voices Tell the Story of North Carolina. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press. p. 101. ISBN .
  18. ^"First Settlers". OuterBanks.com.
  19. ^"Graveyard of the Atlantic - North Carolina Digital History". Retrieved 1 April 2016.
  20. ^D. Moore. (1997) "A General History of Blackbeard the Pirate, the Queen Anne's Revenge and the Adventure". In Tributaries, Volume VII, 1997. pp. 31–35. (North Carolina Maritime History Council)
  21. ^ abcde"Gloucester vs. Outer Banks". National Geographic Channel. Retrieved 1 April 2016.
  22. ^"Outer Banks Fishing". The Outer Banks of North Carolina. Retrieved 21 January 2016.
  23. ^"Outer Banks Lighthouses". OuterBanks.com.
  24. ^DraftExpress - George Ackles
  25. ^Emanuel Davis retires from CFL. thecoastlandtimes.com. Retrieved Aug 3, 2020.
  26. ^Vincent, Mal (February 17, 2008). "The real Andy Griffith lives among us, quietly". The Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved September 20, 2009.
  27. ^Cathy Johnston Forbes – Greater Wilmington Sports Hall of Fame. Retrieved Aug 31, 2020.
  28. ^Speckman, Emma. (Mar 6, 2018). Get inside the mind (and studio) of one of NC’s most prolific creators, costume designer William Ivey Long. Charlotte Five. Retrieved Aug 3, 2020.

External links[edit]

Media related to Outer Banks at Wikimedia Commons Outer Banks travel guide from Wikivoyage

Coordinates: 35°22′25″N75°29′43″W / 35.37365°N 75.49530°W / 35.37365; -75.49530

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outer_Banks

Outer Banks

Starkweather, Sarah. 2012. "Outer Banks 4 - Roanoke Island" Online at FlickrThe Outer Banks are a chain of barrier islands that skirt the coast of North Carolina from the Virginia border to Cape Lookout through Currituck, Dare, Hyde, and Carteret Counties. More than 175 miles long, they are separated as much as 30 miles from the mainland by a series of shallow sounds. Pamlico Sound, the largest sound on the East Coast of the United States (and some say the world's largest), is 80 miles long and 15 to 30 miles wide. It is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a part of the Outer Banks and drains into the Atlantic Ocean through Hatteras and Ocracoke Inlets. Albemarle Sound, the second largest (some 50 miles long and 5 to 14 miles wide), was named after George Monck, duke of Albemarle, one of the Lords Proprietors of the Carolina colony. The state's first permanent settlements were made along its northern shore. Other North Carolina sounds include Core Sound, Croatan Sound, Currituck Sound, and Roanoke Sound.

The topography of the Outer Banks is constantly changing, as inlets open and close and beaches narrow and widen. Windswept and remote, the islands were sparsely populated until the paving of roads, the construction of bridges such as the Herbert Bonner Bridge in the 1960s, and the institution of large-scale ferry service between Ocracoke and the mainland and Ocracoke and Hatteras islands. Once largely uninhabited except for small villages, the Outer Banks are now a popular tourist destination and the permanent home of increasing numbers of residents.

The first inhabitants of the Outer Banks were Native Americans. Many place names, such as Hatteras, Ocracoke, Kinnakeet, Chicamacomico, Manteo, and Wanchese, bear testimony to these early residents. Native Americans on Hatteras Island befriended explorers Philip Amadas and Arthur Barlowe in their reconnaissance mission for Sir Walter Raleigh. Conflicts with Europeans, combined most likely with disease, led to the virtual disappearance of Native American tribes on the Outer Banks by the seventeenth century.

During the colonial period, European settlement on most of the Outer Banks was sparse. After the English failed to establish a permanent settlement at Roanoke Island in the 1580s, few Europeans showed interest in the Outer Banks for the next century and more. In the eighteenth century, probably the most strategic and most heavily populated area of the Outer Banks centered around the islands of Ocracoke and Portsmouth, where colonial shipping found entrance into the southern Pamlico Sound and on to coastal towns like Bath. The inlets and isolation made the Banks attractive to pirates and smugglers; famed pirate Blackbeard (Edward Teach) met his death in the sound waters off Ocracoke, one of his bases of operation. The importance of this part of the Outer Banks to shipping and travel can be seen later as well, in the construction during the early national period of the Ocracoke Lighthouse, operational in 1819.

During the nineteenth century, the Outer Banks remained remote, physically and culturally isolated from mainland North Carolina. Generally removed from the mainstream, Outer Bankers lived a subsistence lifestyle that combined fishing, the salvaging of shipwrecks, piloting of vessels through inlets, and waterfowl hunting. A distinctive English dialect, called the Ocracoke brogue-featuring the unusual pronunciation of the vowel "i" as "oy," leading to the nickname "Hoi Toiders" for those who speak it-developed and remains as a reminder of the remoteness of past Outer Banks communities. Among the affluent planters of the Albemarle, the custom evolved of vacationing in summer at locations such as Nags Head. Nevertheless, the islands remained largely untouched by outside influences.

During the Civil War, occupation of the various inlets along the Outer Banks made the remote islands strategically important to both the Confederacy and the Union. The latter succeeded in occupying the islands throughout most of the war.

Changes in technology, transportation, and economy began to affect the Outer Banks in the late nineteenth century. The construction of the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal by 1859 connected the upper banks with the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. After the Civil War, the canal became integral in the development of new economies on the Outer Banks. A shift from subsistence living to commercial fishing and oystering occurred, as the lives of people on the Outer Banks became intertwined with regional and national market needs and trends. The increasing presence of summer visitors at places such as Nags Head and the arrival of sport waterfowl hunters each fall along the length of the Outer Banks also marked the latter part of the nineteenth century.

In the early twentieth century, the Outer Banks began to feel the pull of mainstream life, and their windswept beaches and dunes earned them a place in history. From January 1901 to August 1902, Reginald A. Fessenden succeeded in sending wireless messages from a tower on Roanoke Island to Cape Hatteras and to Cape Henry, Va. He also received musical notes transmitted from Cape Hatteras. On 17 Dec. 1903, Wilbur and Orville Wright flew an experimental motor-driven airplane for 12 seconds at Kitty Hawk, changing transportation forever. Two world wars brought submarine warfare to the coast of the Outer Banks, especially in the waters off Hatteras Island.

The advent of the affordable automobile combined with the paving of roads, especially U.S. 12 on Bodie, Hatteras, and Ocracoke Islands, began to transform the Outer Banks in the 1920s and 1930s. Federal New Deal funds allowed for road paving and dune stabilization, and large tracts of land were designated in 1937 for the creation of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. This was followed just before World War II by the creation of the Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge.

Although regions of the Outer Banks have remained among the least developed stretches of seashore on the Atlantic coast of the United States, increasing tourism and contact with the outside world has led to tremendous development in the area. Approximately 7 million visitors from around the world stay for short or extended periods in the Outer Banks, enjoying ocean activities such as swimming, hang gliding, fishing, windsurfing, and bird watching as well as cultural activities. The Outer Banks History Center in Manteo has thousands of manuscripts, pamphlets, photographs, maps, paintings, and other items related to the history of the area. Population growth in the Outer Banks has been approximately double the North Carolina average. By 2004 the year-round population of the banks had increased to more than 45,000 people, creating great demand for new housing, particularly in the northern areas.

References:

John Alexander and James Lazell, Ribbon of Sand: The Amazing Convergence of the Ocean and the Outer Banks (2000).

Rodney Barfield, Seasoned by Salt: A Historical Album of the Outer Banks (1995).

Dirk Frankenberg, The Nature of the Outer Banks: Environmental Processes, Field Sites, and Development Issues, Corolla to Ocracoke (1995).

Thomas J. Schoenbaum, Islands, Capes, and Sounds: The North Carolina Coast (repr., 1988).

David Stick, The Outer Banks of North Carolina, 1584-1958 (1958).

Stick, An Outer Banks Reader (1998).

Additional Resources:

"With a quaintness born of history, the sister barrier islands," Our State, June 1999. http://digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/ref/collection/p16062coll18/id/67897

Image credits:

Starkweather, Sarah. 2012. "Outer Banks 4 - Roanoke Island." Online at Flickr at https://www.flickr.com/photos/sarah1rene/7250632648/. Accessed 6/28/2012.

 

Источник: https://www.ncpedia.org/outer-banks

Is the Outer Banks beaches open?

The Outer Banks now open to visitors!

What is the curfew in Dare County?

North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper’s new Modified Stay-at-Home Order, one that essentially imposes a curfew between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m., goes into effect on Friday, Dec.

Is Hatteras Island closed to visitors?

Both Cape Lookout and Cape Hatteras national seashores have remained open to visitors during the pandemic, though facilities including restrooms and camp grounds have been closed.

What is the non emergency for Dare County NC?

(252)

What is the phone number for Dare County?

Dare County, NCPHONE: FAX: HONE: FAX: HONE: FAX: HONE: FAX: HONE: FAX: HONE: FAX: HONE: FAX: HONE: FAX: ais 7 linhas

How much does a Dare County Sheriff make?

Average annual salary was $46,505 and median salary was $42,417. Dare County average salary is 1 percent lower than USA average and median salary is 2 percent lower than USA median.

How much do teachers make in Dare County?

WRAL News requested the salary data and ranked it, which showed that Dare County Schools has the top spot with an average teacher salary of $59,223 this school year.

How much does a Dare County paramedic make?

Initial salaries for Emergency Medical Technicians are about $24,000 to $29,000, while paramedics can start at a little over $32,000. This year, salaries were budgeted at $3.1 million and overtime at $1.4 million. At Monday’s Board of Commissioners meeting, two speakers expressed concerns about changes in scheduling.

What is the Dare County School Boss program?

(BOSS Program) Every employee in Dare County Schools receives a BOSS card for the duration of their employment. The BOSS card also entitles the employee to free admission to Dare County Schools athletic events.

What is the pay scale for Dare County Schools?

Average Salary for Dare County Schools EmployeesCustodian. $20k – $44k.Middle School Teacher. $37k – $73k.School Psychologist. $37k – $64k.

Who is the Dare County staff?

Main Switchboard: 252.475. 5000StaffTitlePhoneAnby, CherylClerk to the Board of Commissionersnders, RobertDeputy Sheriffnderson, CaitlinIncome Maintenance Caseworkernderson, GabeWTP Operator – Skycoais 16 linhas

What high schools are in Dare County?

First Flight High School. Kill Devil Hills, NC. Dare County Schools. #1in Dare County Schools Rankings. Manteo High School. Manteo, NC. Dare County Schools. #2in Dare County Schools Rankings. Cape Hatteras Secondary School. Buxton, NC. Dare County Schools. Dare Learning Academy. Manteo, NC. Dare County Schools.

What is the Dare County Tax?

The minimum combi sales tax rate for Dare County, North Carolina is 6.75%. This is the total of state and county sales tax rates. The North Carolina state sales tax rate is currently 4.75%. The Dare County sales tax rate is 2%.

What are Dare County school lunches?

Dare County Schools offers healthy meals every school day. Breakfast costs $1.25; lunch costs $2.75 in elementary and $3.00 in middle and high schools.

Who is on the Dare County Board of Education?

Board of EducationElected OfficialsBoard of EducationTerm EndsCarl Woody124 Raleigh Wood Dr. Manteo, NC argaret Lawler, Vice-Chairman81 Gravey Pond Lane Kitty Hawk ary Ellon Ballance, ChairmanPO Box 756 Hatteras oe TauberPO Kill Devil Hills ais 3 linhas

Who is the Dare County Commissioners meeting?

Meetings are generally held on the first Monday of the month at 9 a.m. and the third Monday of each month at 5 p.m. Occasionally this schedule is adjusted to accommodate holidays, and there are a few months each year when only one meeting is conducted.

What is the Dare County Board of Education meetings?

Board of Education Meeting Schedule DateTimeLocation of MeetingOctober 13, p.m.Kitty Hawk Elementary SchoolNovember 10, p.m.Manteo Elementary SchoolDecember 8, p.m.Manteo High SchoolJanuary 12, p.m.First Flight Elementary SchoolMais 6 linhas

Where was Outer Banks filmed?

Charleston

Where is John B’s house in real life?

The John B’s house pier is located in the Secessionville Historic District also in James Island, but if you are visiting the neighborhood, please respect the private properties of the area! The success of the series has caused a lot of trespassing that is very unwelcome for the owners.

Why is Outer Banks not in Outer Banks?

Outer Banks was not filmed in the actual Outer Banks. The show was originally intended to shoot in North Carolina, but showrunners moved it out of the state in response of the HB2 transgender bathroom bill. Instead, the show was filmed outside of Charleston, South Carolina.

Источник: https://electroanswers.com/computer-hardware/is-the-outer-banks-beaches-open/

This site, OuterBanksThisWeek.com, is the closest you can get to being on the Outer Banks, NC, without actually being here. Here, in the words of locals who know this place inside and out, you’ll find the detailed information you need to really know the Outer Banks. Want information on Outer Banks Nightlife while you’re here? We’ve got it – who’s playing where, what play is being performed, what well-known touring group is here, Outer Banks music and musicians you really should hear. Want to know about local events and happenings, such as annual events, specialty events or seasonal events? Dive in here; we’ve got it all. Other Outer Banks, NC, things to do are here too, such as scheduled programs at major attractions or recreational activities that happen every week. Plenty of other things to do are also here on the Outer Banks. While you’re visiting the Outer Banks, NC, we know you’ll plan on enjoying some restaurants too. You’ll find information such as daily specials, complete contact info, where you need a reservation or where you can bring large parties more easily. And, you’ll appreciate the hundreds of coupons you can download from this site that will make it cheaper to dine, shop and enjoy the great outdoors at hot spots on the Outer Banks. Speaking of the great outdoors, Outer Banks, NC, fishing enthusiasts will look to this site every day for information on what’s being caught, where to go to catch it, what trophies the offshore boats are bringing in and more. And, finally, the only sport more popular than fishing is probably Outer Banks shopping … yes, it’s a sport in many people’s eyes! Through Outer Banks This Week, you’ll learn where the great sales are located, connect with individual shops to get a sneak preview of what they offer before you go and see highlights of the latest and greatest new inventory.

If you want to be a member of the Outer Banks, you need to use OuterBanksThisWeek.com. Don’t miss a thing that’s happening while you’re here!

9 Ways to Get Merry on the Outer Banks

The Outer Banks is a fun place to be during the holiday season. If you’re looking to entertain your family and gather with friends, here are nine ways to get a shot of the holiday spirit. WinterLights Through January 16 Holiday magic is alive and well at The Elizabethan Gardens. This event is a true crowd pleaser, and only the grinchiest of Grinches would not enjoy bundling up and strolling through the 10 acres of gardens that are decorated with millions of lights and... Read More

Top Picks

Top Picks: Nightlife

Logo for Elizabethan Gardens

WinterLights 2021

Elizabethan Gardens

Roanoke Island

Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm

Elizabethan Gardens, WinterLights 2021
Logo for Elizabethan Gardens

WinterLights 2021

Elizabethan Gardens

Roanoke Island

Wednesday, December 8, 2021 - 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm

Elizabethan Gardens, WinterLights 2021
Logo for Elizabethan Gardens

WinterLights 2021

Elizabethan Gardens

Roanoke Island

Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm

Elizabethan Gardens, WinterLights 2021
Logo for Outer Banks Brewing Station

Trivia Night

Outer Banks Brewing Station

Kill Devil Hills

Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 9:30 pm

Outer Banks Brewing Station, Trivia Night
Logo for Elizabethan Gardens

WinterLights 2021

Elizabethan Gardens

Roanoke Island

Friday, December 10, 2021 - 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm

Elizabethan Gardens, WinterLights 2021
Logo for Outer Banks Brewing Station

DJ Gustavo

Outer Banks Brewing Station

Kill Devil Hills

Friday, December 10, 2021 - 10:00 pm to Saturday, December 11, 2021 - 2:00 am

Outer Banks Brewing Station, DJ Gustavo

Top Picks: Daytime Entertainment & Special Events

Logo for Dare County Arts Council

Rob Snyder Exhibit

Dare County Arts Council

Manteo

Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

Dare County Arts Council, Rob Snyder Exhibit
Logo for Ocracoke Preservation Society

Annual Wassail Party

Ocracoke Preservation Society

Ocracoke

Tuesday, December 7, 2021 - 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm

Ocracoke Preservation Society, Annual Wassail Party
Logo for Dare County Arts Council

Rob Snyder Exhibit

Dare County Arts Council

Manteo

Wednesday, December 8, 2021 - 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

Dare County Arts Council, Rob Snyder Exhibit
Logo for Dare County Arts Council

Rob Snyder Exhibit

Dare County Arts Council

Manteo

Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

Dare County Arts Council, Rob Snyder Exhibit
Logo for Dare County Arts Council

Rob Snyder Exhibit

Dare County Arts Council

Manteo

Friday, December 10, 2021 - 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

Dare County Arts Council, Rob Snyder Exhibit

Top Picks: Great Plates

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Источник: https://outerbanksthisweek.com/
NCpedia". ncpedia.org. Retrieved 2016-04-10.
  • ^"Outer Banks Map". OuterBanks.com. Retrieved 10 April 2016.
  • ^"Outer Banks

    Outer Banks Coronavirus Updates: Beach & Travel Restrictions

    Coronavirus response

    We are doing everything we can to make sure you, our valued guests and extended Twiddy family, are well taken care of. In return, we ask for your patience as we navigate this unprecedented event. On this page we will outline Outer Banks coronavirus updates, both from Twiddy and the state of North Carolina. For detailed information on Outer Banks Covid restrictions, jump to our bulletins section.

    Latest Coronavirus Update - Updated July 30, 2021

    The Governor of North Carolina issued a new Executive Order yesterday. More details below.

    Read more

    Committed to Safety

    The safety and wellbeing of our guests are a top priority, and the cleanliness of our homes is something we take very seriously. We remain committed to upholding the highest standards of cleanliness by using cleaning products widely-used in the vacation rental industry. Additionally, we are using this time to put extra attention into getting our homes ready for the upcoming season.

    Housekeeping

    • Our housekeeping crews are thoroughly trained before preparing any homes.
    • Our housekeeping supervision team works in the field to help ensure proper practices are being followed.
    • We are supplying cleaning crews and staff with the necessary Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).
    • We are taking additional precautions such as more targeted disinfecting of high touch/high traffic surfaces including tables, faucets, and doorknobs.
    • We are utilizing products that are EPA-approved for use against the virus that causes COVID-19.
    • Bed sheets and bath towels are provided by a state of the art commercial laundry facility.
    • Pools and hot tubs are cleaned and have the chemicals balanced between guests.

    Field Services

    • Our Field Technicians assist in preparing homes for arrival, as well as handle various maintenance concerns that may arise during your stay.
    • Field Technicians will wear necessary Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) when entering homes.
    • Maintenance issues are addressed by our Field Technicians with as little interruption to your stay as possible.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    Cleaning & Safety Measures

    What steps are your cleaners taking and what products are you using in the homes?

    We’re committed to upholding the highest standards of cleanliness by using CDC-recommended and EPA-approved products to clean our homes. We’re ensuring that our house cleaners continue to pay special attention to frequently touched surfaces including tables, faucets, railings, and doorknobs. The safety and well-being of our guests are a top priority and the cleanliness of our homes is something we take very seriously.

    Our Field Supervisors perform routine quality assurance audits to ensure that cleaning and inspection processes are followed. For reservations that include linens, beds will be made with fitted sheet, flat sheet and pillow cases only. In an effort to limit contact with your bedding, other bedding will be placed in the closet of the bedroom, including extra pillows, shams, comforters and blankets.Click here to learn more about our cleaning procedures in response to COVID-19.Click here to learn more about our cleaning procedures in response to COVID-19.

    Are the warmth layers, such as blankets, on the beds washed weekly?

    Blankets are not laundered weekly, however, in order to limit contact with personal use items, beds will be made with fitted sheet, flat sheet, and pillow cases only. Blankets will be placed in the closets and will not be on the beds.You are welcome to use the washer and dryer at the home if you would like to launder blankets prior to using, but please know not all will fit in the machines. We encourage you to bring your own blankets from home.

    Are my sheets clean? Did someone touch them?

    Sheets and towels are laundered in a highly automated and sophisticated commercial laundry facility, where they are wrapped in plastic immediately after laundering. Beds are made by our housekeepers who are instructed on proper handling of laundry.

    Can COVID-19 be transmitted in a pool or hot tub?

    Pools and hot tubs are cleaned and chemically treated prior to each guest's arrival, as well as a midweek chemical check. The CDC has stated there is no evidence that COVID-19 can be spread to humans through the use of pools, hot tubs or spas, or water playgrounds. Proper operation, maintenance, and disinfection (e.g., with chlorine and bromine) of pools, hot tubs or spas, and water playgrounds should inactivate the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

    When You Get Here

    Is the Outer Banks in short supply of anything?

    Currently we are not experiencing widespread shortages of groceries on the Outer Banks. However, like many places in the United States, all shoppers should expect to see changes in product availability at grocery and retail outlets as supply chain demand fluctuates across the nation. If possible, visitors should bring essentials with them, including paper and sanitizing products and non-perishable groceries.

    Access & Reservation Questions

    When did the travel restrictions lift and the Outer Banks reopen?

    Following the outbreak of the novel coronavirus and growing concerns for the community, local officials made the decision to restrict entry to the Outer Banks to residents only beginning in March 2020. Re-entry for visitors to the Outer Banks began on Saturday, May 16th at 12:01 AM. Click here for more information from Dare County.

    What are my options if I do not plan on coming on my vacation?

    We would love the opportunity to try and find a solution that works for your group and the homeowner. These are the steps to take, in order:

    1. Begin the re-market process in an attempt to get the home/week re-rented. We have already seen an influx of guests who are interested in booking an Outer Banks vacation
    2. If you have purchased travel insurance, start the claim process. If you have questions, contact Generali Global Assistance at 866-999-4018 and reference plan code G-332CSA.
    3. If the re-market process and/or travel insurance claim is unsuccessful, you may be able to reschedule your vacation for a future week(s) in the same house pending owner approval.

    If your arrival date is prior to 5/16/2020, your reservation is affected by the Outer Banks bridge closure and you are eligible for a refund. If you prefer to switch your travel dates instead of the refund, please contact our office.

    What is the Twiddy & Company cancellation/refund policy in response to COVID-19?

    Given the unique and rapidly changing nature of this situation, we are handling each reservation individually. We understand one solution may not work for everyone. Rest assured we are doing our best to help each and every guest as we all navigate these uncharted waters together.

    If your arrival date was before 5/16/2020, your reservation is affected by restricted access to the Outer Banks. You will receive a refund of all monies paid. The refund will include the rental fee, home service fee, taxes, and travel insurance (if purchased), and will be processed on the Monday following the last day of your scheduled vacation.

    If you prefer to reschedule your vacation for a future week(s) in the same house instead of a refund, please contact our office.

    Am I covered by travel insurance?

    Since we are not licensed insurance agents, and due to the unique nature of this situation, all travel insurance-related questions should be directed to Generali Global Assistance 866-999-4018. Please reference plan code G-332CSA. We also encourage you to read Generali’s position statement regarding COVID-19 coverage.

    My affected reservation dates have passed and I opted for a refund. When will I receive it?

    The refund is processed once the departure date has passed. Refunds include all monies paid for the vacation including the rental fee, home service fee, taxes, and travel insurance (if applicable).

    All monies will be returned to the leaseholder and any additional payers via the method of the original payment. If the rental amount was paid electronically, via credit card or eCheck, the refund will be processed through our third-party processor. If the original payment was via paper check, monies will be returned via paper check.

    Our team is working hard to process all refunds within 15-30 days of the departure date. However, it may take additional time for the financial institutions to finalize the refund and post to your credit card account or deposit to your bank account.

    Additional Resources

    County Websites

    Local County Websites

    Please monitor these official resources

    Travel Insurance

    Travel Insurance Information

    Please contact Generali Global Assistance directly

    Latest Outer Banks Coronavirus Updates

    • Bulletin #24

      July 30, 2021
    • Bulletin #23

      May 14, 2021
    • Bulletin #22

      April 29, 2021
    • Bulletin #21

      March 23, 2021
    • Bulletin #20

      December 8, 2020
    • Bulletin #19

      November 12, 2020
    • Bulletin #18

      October 5, 2020
    • Bulletin #17

      September 2, 2020
    • Bulletin #16

      July 2, 2020
    • Bulletin #15

      May 20, 2020
    • Bulletin #14

      May 6, 2020
    • Bulletin #13

      April 27, 2020
    • Bulletin #12

      April 21, 2020
    • Bulletin #11

      April 17, 2020
    • Bulletin #10

      March 30, 2020
    • Bulletin #9

      March 27, 2020
    • Bulletin #8

      March 25, 2020
    • Bulletin #7

      March 23, 2020
    • Bulletin #6

      March 21, 2020
    • Bulletin #5

      March 20, 2020
    • Bulletin #4

      March 20, 2020
    • Bulletin #3

      March 18, 2020
    • Bulletin #2

      March 18, 2020
    • Bulletin #1

      March 17, 2020

    Bulletin #24: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Friday, July 30, 2021 9:56 AM

    The Governor of North Carolina has issued a new Executive Order which includes a recommendation that everyone wears masks indoors. This is currently only a suggestion and there are no new or additional mandates in place on the Outer Banks at this time. Read the full Executive Order

    More Details on North Carolina Phased Reopening.

    Please visit the Dare County website for more details and answers to frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19 regulations on the Outer Banks specifically.

    Bulletin #22: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Thursday, April 29, 2021 4:50 PM

    Effective this Friday, April 30, 2021, the Governor of North Carolina will continue the phased approach of easing of certain COVID-19 restrictions. Particularly, indoor gathering limits have increased to 100, and outdoor limits have increased to 200. Read the full Executive Order

    More Details on North Carolina Phased Reopening.

    Please visit the Dare County website for more details and answers to frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19 regulations on the Outer Banks specifically.

    Bulletin #21: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Tuesday, March 23, 2021 2:33 PM

    Effective this Friday, March 26, 2021, the Governor of North Carolina will continue the phased approach of easing of certain COVID-19 restrictions. Face coverings will still be required in indoor and outdoor spaces where social distancing cannot be maintained.

    More Details on North Carolina Phased Reopening.

    Please visit the Dare County website for more details and answers to frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19 regulations on the Outer Banks specifically.

    Bulletin #20: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Tuesday, December 8, 2020 4:00 PM

    The Governor of North Carolina has issued a modified stay at home order effective Friday, December 11, 2020 at 5:00 pm through January 8, 2021 at 5:00 pm, unless otherwise modified or extended.

    Executive Order 181 implements a modified stay at home order. The Order also extends the capacity limitations, indoor and outdoor gathering limits, and other public health restrictions put in place under previous executive orders.

    Details on North Carolina Phase 3 can be found here.

    Please visit the Dare County website for more details and answers to frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19 regulations on the Outer Banks.

    Bulletin #19: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Thursday, November 12, 2020 3:10 PM

    North Carolina entered Phase 3 of Safer at Home, the Governor’s three-phase plan to reopen North Carolina amid the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, on October 2 at 5:00 pm. An extension of the Phase 3 order is going into effect Friday, November 13, 2020. 

    Executive Order 176 is adjusting limits on indoor mass gatherings to protect public health. Previously, indoor gatherings of up to 25 people were allowed. Now, Indoor gatherings are not to exceed ten people. The order states “When more than ten (10) people reside in the same household, residing together does not form a Mass Gathering.” This gathering restriction does not apply to occupants of vacation homes.

    Details on North Carolina Phase 3 can be found here.

    Please visit the Dare County website for more details and answers to frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19 regulations on the Outer Banks.

    Bulletin #18: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Monday, October 25, 2020 2:26 PM

    North Carolina entered Phase 3 of Safer at Home, the Governor’s three-phase plan to reopen North Carolina amid the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, on October 2 at 5:00 pm. Phase 3 will remain in effect until at least October 23rd. Mask mandates and other prevention methods remain in effect. Changes from Phase 2.5 to Phase 3 include:

    • Bars’ outdoor seating areas may reopen at 30% capacity. Indoor bar areas remain closed.
    • Movie theaters may reopen at 30% capacity or 100 people, whichever is less.
    • The limits on mass gatherings will remain at 25 people indoors and 50 people outdoors.
    • The 11 pm curfew on alcohol sales for in-person consumption in locations such as restaurants and outdoor bars will be extended to October 23.

    Details on North Carolina Phase 3 can be found here.

    Please visit the Dare County website for more details and answers to frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19 regulations on the Outer Banks.

    Bulletin #17: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Wednesday, September 2, 2020 6:39 AM

    North Carolina will enter Phase 2.5 of Safer at Home, the Governor’s three-phase plan to reopen North Carolina amid the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, on September 4 at 5:00 pm and will remain in effect until at least October 2nd. Mask mandates and other prevention methods remain in effect. Bars, nightclubs, movie theaters, and indoor entertainment facilities remain closed. Changes from Phase 2 to Phase 2.5 include:  

    • Mass gathering limits increase to 25 people indoors and 50 people outdoors.
    • Playgrounds may open. 
    • Museums and aquariums may open at 50% capacity. 
    • Gyms and indoor exercise facilities may open at 30% capacity. 

    Details on North Carolina Phase 2.5 can be found here.

    Please visit the Dare County website for more details and answers to frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19 regulations on the Outer Banks.

    Bulletin #16: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Thursday, July 2, 2020 8:39 AM

    In the state of North Carolina, individuals are currently required to wear a face covering in indoor and outdoor public spaces where social distancing cannot be maintained.

    Please visit the Dare County website for more details and answers to frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19 regulations on the Outer Banks.

    Bulletin #15: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Wednesday, May 20, 2020 6:27 PM

    The Outer Banks has reopened for visitors as of May 16th.

    For our guests who would like to reinstate their reservations, please email [email protected] with reservation details including confirmation number.

    Beginning Friday, May 22 at 5:00 PM, North Carolina's Safer at Home Order transitions to Phase 2 of easing certain COVID-19 restrictions. Click here for more information on NC Governor Roy Cooper's COVID-19 Executive Orders.

    Bulletin #14: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Wednesday, May 6, 2020 12:56 PM

    The Outer Banks will reopen to visitors on Saturday, May 16th.

    Dare County, in coordination with Hyde and Currituck Counties, will lift restrictions on entry for visitors beginning Saturday, May 16 at 12:01 AM. Law enforcement continues to enforce entry restrictions until then. Click here for more details on the Dare county website.

    For our guests who would like to reinstate their reservations, please email [email protected] with reservation details including confirmation number.

    Beginning Friday, May 8 at 5:00 PM, North Carolina's Stay at Home Order transitions to Phase 1 of slowly easing certain COVID-19 restrictions. Click here for more information on NC Phase 1 reopening.

    Bulletin #13: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Monday, April 27, 2020 5:48 PM

    Travel restrictions remain in place with no set reopening date yet. There has been a change to Currituck's County's previous statement.

    Currituck and Dare counties have announced they will now work together on a coordinated reentry date for visitors to the Outer Banks. As such, Currituck County will remove the May 15th date from their State of Emergency and will move forward with a coordinated plan between the two counties.

    Following the Governor’s action with regard to the statewide Stay at Home Order, which has been extended to May 8, Currituck and Dare County officials will meet again to establish a timeline for visitor entry to the Currituck and Dare Outer Banks. A joint announcement will be made once a date has been agreed upon. No date has been issued yet.

    We continue to experience historically high call and email volume. We apologize for the longer than normal wait times, but please know our team is working hard to help each and every guest. If you are not traveling within the next two weeks, we ask that you contact us closer to your trip to allow us to prioritize those with more immediate travel plans. In the meantime, please stay tuned to our website or local county websites for the most up-to-date information.

    Bulletin #12: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Tuesday, April 21, 2020 7:24 PM

    Travel restrictions are still in place on the Outer Banks with no opening date yet, however, the counties have begun to plan for reentry.

    Currituck County will begin to allow non-resident property owners access this Thursday, April 23rd. Currituck County has anticipated May 15th re-entry for visitors, but will re-evaluate on May 4th to confirm. For more details, please visit Currituck County's website.

    Dare County will offer tiered reentry for non-resident property owners based on last name beginning on Monday, May 4th. At this time, there has been no date set for visitor reentry. Dare county will address visitor access at a future date to allow for necessary syndromic surveillance and monitoring of resource availability. Dare County’s Stay Home - Stay Healthy order has been extended to May 22, 2020. For more details, please visit Dare County's website.

    In addition, all individuals in Dare County are now required to wear a mask or cloth face covering in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain.

    It is important to remember that these dates are still subject to change. We will continue to share updates as new information becomes available.

    We continue to experience high call volume. It is important to us that everyone gets the assistance they need. If you are not traveling within the next two weeks, we ask that you contact us closer to your trip to allow us to prioritize those with more immediate travel plans. In the meantime, please stay tuned to our website or local county websites for the most up-to-date information.

    Bulletin #11: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Friday, April 17, 2020 3:29 PM

    We are currently experiencing high call volume. It is important to us that everyone gets the assistance they need. If you are not traveling within the next two weeks, we ask that you contact us closer to your trip to allow us to prioritize those with more immediate travel plans.

    Travel restrictions are currently still in place on the Outer Banks that deny access to non-residents. At this time, we do not know when the bridge may be open again. In this time of uncertainty, we are doing everything we can to make sure you, our valued guests and extended Twiddy family, are well taken care of. In return, we ask for your patience as we navigate this unprecedented event.

    Given the unique and rapidly changing nature of this situation, we are handling each of your upcoming reservations individually. It is important to us that everyone gets the personal assistance they need.

    If you have a reservation scheduled to arrive:

    • Within the next 14 days - please get in touch with us to discuss options for your vacation.
    • Outside of the next 14 days - we ask that you contact us closer to your trip to allow us to prioritize those with more immediate travel plans. Plus, things very well could change before then. In the meantime, stay tuned to our website for updates.

    Please read more on our Response to Coronavirus page.

    Also for your beach fix from home, visit our OBX From Home page.

    Bulletin #10: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Monday, March 30, 2020 2:55 PM

    As of March 30 at 5:00pm, the Governor has issued a Stay Home order for all of North Carolina. The Order directs people to stay at home except to visit essential businesses, to exercise outdoors, or to help a family member. Specifically, the order bans gatherings of more than 10 people and directs everyone to physically stay at least six feet apart from others. This Order permits the following businesses to remain open:

    • Restaurants that provide take-out, drive-thru, or delivery
    • Grocery stores
    • ABC stores and beer and wine stores
    • Doctors and other healthcare providers
    • Pharmacies
    • Hardware stores
    • Post offices
    • Gas stations and convenience stores
    • Veterinarians and pet supply stores
    • Hotels, airlines, buses, taxis, and rideshare services
    • Places of worship
    • Child care providers

    Click here to view a full list of FAQs on the Stay at Home Order.

    Travel restrictions remain in place. Visitors and non-resident property owners are not permitted access to the Outer Banks. Stay tuned to official county websites for the most up to date and accurate information:

    We will also continue to post bulletins and updates on social media as information becomes available.

    Bulletin #9: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Friday, March 27, 2020 3:25 PM

    Additional restrictions have been added to the State of Emergency Declaration that is currently in effect in Dare County. The “Stay Home - Stay Healthy” declaration goes into effect on Saturday, March 28 at 5:00PM and is being implemented to further minimize opportunities for exposure and transmission of COVID-19 in Dare County. This is not a Shelter in Place order. For more information and details please visit darenc.com/covid19.  Click for a “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” guide with frequently asked questions.

    Currituck County has established a checkpoint just north of Sanderling. The main goal of this checkpoint is to monitor the flow of traffic in and out of Corolla as the county continues to assess local conditions. Anyone who has passed the main checkpoint to gain access to Dare County across the Wright Memorial Bridge will be allowed to pass between Dare County and Currituck County on the Outer Banks.

    Travel restrictions remain in place. Visitors and non-resident property owners are not permitted access to the Outer Banks. Stay tuned to official county websites for the most up to date and accurate information:

    We will also continue to post bulletins and updates on social media as information becomes available.

    Bulletin #8: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Wednesday, March 25, 2020 5:51 PM

    The health and safety of guests, homeowners, and staff remain our top priority. As a reminder, Twiddy & Company has switched to a remote office workforce until further notice. We are still available by phone every day from 9:00AM to 5:00PM.

    We are currently experiencing high call volume. It is important to us that everyone gets the assistance they need. If you are not traveling within the next two weeks, we ask that you contact us closer to your trip to allow us to prioritize those with more immediate travel plans and continue to monitor our website for any updates.

    Travel restrictions remain in place. Stay tuned to official county websites for the most up to date and accurate information:

    We will also continue to post bulletins and updates on social media as information becomes available.

    Bulletin #7: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Monday, March 23, 2020 12:42 PM

    We are currently experiencing high call volume. It is important to us that everyone gets the assistance they need. If you are not traveling within the next two weeks, we ask that you contact us closer to your trip to allow us to prioritize those with more immediate travel plans and continue to monitor our website for any updates.

    Stay tuned to official county websites for the most up to date and accurate information:

    Read more on our blog post. We will continue to post bulletins and updates on social media as information becomes available.

    Bulletin #6: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Saturday, March 21, 2020 1:36 PM

    We are currently helping guests with planned arrivals between now and early May. Those with reservations scheduled to arrive at the end of May and later should continue to monitor our latest bulletins. This is a unique situation that is still fluid, still dynamic. At this time, we do not know when these restrictions might end.

    Guests with reservations arriving

    • Now through May 15, 2020: Call our office (252) 457-1100 to discuss options for your reservation or if you have already spoken to us but have additional questions as things change.
    • May 16, 2020 and later: If possible, please wait to contact us. It is too early to tell if your reservation will be affected by the current travel restrictions on the Outer Banks. Please continue to check our bulletin for updates

    Stay tuned to official county websites for the most up to date and accurate information:

    Read more on our blog post. We will continue to post bulletins and updates on social media as information becomes available.

    Bulletin #5: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Friday, March 20, 2020 9:11 PM

    Effective beginning 10pm this evening, Friday, March 20th, Dare and Currituck County will prohibit access to visitors and non-resident property owners.

    Please continue to monitor official county websites for the more up to date information:

    It is unknown when these restrictions for visitors and non-resident property owners will be lifted.

    We are asking that guests call the office to discuss their impending reservations at (252) 457-1100. We continue to contact guests, focusing first on those scheduled to arrive now through early May. Please know we are doing our best to assist every guest as quickly as possible. Due to high call volume, we ask that those with reservations after May 15th please wait to contact us. If your matter is urgent, please do not hesitate to reach out. This is still a very fluid situation that is likely to change as the days and weeks progress.

    We will continue to update Twiddy.com and our social media channels as new information becomes available.

    Bulletin #4: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Friday, March 20, 2020 8:02 AM

    Currituck County has joined Dare County in issuing an formal statement which restricts visitors from accessing the Outer Banks. Visitors to Currituck Outer Banks (Corolla and the 4x4 beaches) have not been permitted access since Dare County issued their restriction on March 17 as access to these areas is through Dare County. There is currently no information on when the travel restrictions will be lifted.

    Please continue to monitor official county websites for the more up to date information:

    Please continue to monitor official county websites for the more up to date information:

    We are asking that guests call the office to discuss their impending reservations at (252) 457-1100. We continue to contact guests, focusing first on those scheduled to arrive now through early May. Please know we are doing our best to assist every guest as quickly as possible. Due to high call volume, we ask that those with reservations after May 15th please wait to contact us. If your matter is urgent, please do not hesitate to reach out. This is still a very fluid situation that is likely to change as the days and weeks progress.

    We will continue to update Twiddy.com and our social media channels as new information becomes available.

    Bulletin #3: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Wednesday, March 18, 2020 5:43 PM

    Access to the Outer Banks is still restricted to residents and property owners only. Dare County has not posted any information on when these restrictions will be lifted at this time. Please follow official county websites for updates:

    We are asking that guests call the office to discuss their impending reservations at (252) 457-1100. We are also in the process of contacting guests, focusing first on those scheduled to arrive now through early May. Please know we are doing our best to assist every guest as quickly as possible. Due to high call volume, we ask that those with reservations after May 15th please wait to contact us. If your matter is urgent, please do not hesitate to reach out. This is still a very fluid situation that is likely to change as the days and weeks progress.

    We will continue to update Twiddy.com and our social media channels as new information becomes available.

    Bulletin #2: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Wednesday, March 18, 2020 9:01 AM

    The Dare County Control Group has made the decision to restrict visitor access to Dare County beginning Tuesday, March 17, at 2:00 p.m. Checkpoints have been established at entry points to Dare County and no visitors will be allowed access. Please visit Dare County’s website for the most up to date information. This also restricts access to Corolla and the 4x4 beaches as entry is dependent on travel through Dare County. Please visit Currituck County’s website for more information.

    While the travel restriction is in effect, only residents of the Outer Banks are permitted to enter Dare County. Currently, we do not have information on when the restriction will lift. We are monitoring the situation closely and will alert guests once we learn more. 

    Guests who are currently in-house are currently not required to leave, but will not be permitted access back into Dare County should they leave and try to return. Also be aware the Governor has issued an executive order effective at 5:00 p.m. March 17 stating all North Carolina restaurants and bars will be closed to dine-in customers. Takeout and delivery orders can continue.

    Travel Insurance related questions should be directed to Generali Global Assistance directly at (866) 999-4018 or visit their website (plan code G-332CSA).

    For guests with concerns about an upcoming reservation, please contact our office 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. You may experience extended hold times, but please know we are doing our best to assist every guest as quickly as possible. This is a rapidly evolving situation. We will continue to update Twiddy.com and our social media channels as new information becomes available. 

    Bulletin #1: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

    Tuesday, March 17, 2020 1:59 PM

    Dare County will restrict access to visitors begining today, March 17 at 2:00PM.

    Message from Dare County:
    In response to updated guidelines from the CDC to avoid discretionary travel and follow the The President’s Coronavirus Guidelines for America, the Dare County Control Group has made the decision to restrict visitor access to Dare County beginning today, Tuesday, March 17 at 2:00 p.m. Beginning at 2:00 p.m., checkpoints will be established at entry points to Dare County and no visitors will be allowed access. Permanent residents, non-resident property owners and non-resident employees of Dare County businesses may review entry guidelines at www.darenc.com/entry. Staff is working to activate the online permitting system by 1:00 p.m

    Please visit Dare County's website for the most up to date information: https://www.darenc.com/departments/health-human-services/coronavirus.

    All travel insurance questions should be directed to Generali (plan code G-332CSA). Click here for more information.

    This is a rapidly evolving situation and we will share updates as quickly as possible as they become available.

    Enjoy the Outer Banks from Home

    We know that taking a vacation is important and, let's be honest, we could all use one right about now. Until you can visit in person again, we have put together a collection of videos, blogs, and more help you relax and soak in the sights and sounds of the Outer Banks right from home.

    Serenity Videos OBX

    Sunrise on the OBX

    COMING SOON

    Outer Banks Sunset
    Источник: https://www.twiddy.com/our-response-to-coronavirus/

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