is vaping bad for you yes or no

Is being around secondhand vape safe? No. According to the Surgeon General, Yes. E-cigarettes and other vaping devices can be used to vape other. DON'T BLOWIT: ANTI-VAPING CAMPAIGN. VAPING: QUIZ. Multiple Choice Questions: (circle one). 1 Can vaping negatively affect your health? A. Yes. B. No. both products does not reduce your risk for smoking-caused illness. Vaping is not harmless. Instead, you may consider the safe and proven .

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Is vaping bad for you yes or no -

Vaping policy - rapid questions and answers

I just filed a submission with the Philippines House of Representatives for its Joint Trade & Health Industry Committee hearings on e-cigarettes, to be held 10 December.

The full submission (PDF) starts with an introductory Q&A and then goes on to provide more detail about specific issues with some backup material. I thought the 15 questions and answers might be of more general interest, so I have reproduced it below.

Questions and answer – rapid responses

1. Are e-cigarettes less harmful than cigarettes?

Yes. Beyond any reasonable doubt, e-cigarettes are much less harmful. Almost all the harm done by cigarettes arises from the smoke, and e-cigarettes do not produce smoke. Though we cannot have 50-year studies of a product that has only been in use for about 10 years that does not mean we have no data. We have extensive data on the toxins in the vapour and measurements of ‘exposure biomarkers’ in the blood, urine and saliva of users – all suggest very much lower risks than smoking.

2. How much less harmful are e-cigarettes than cigarettes?

The US National Academies of Science Engineering and Mathematics said they are “likely to be far less harmful” than cigarettes. The premier British medical organisation, the Royal College of Physicians, said e-cigarettes are “unlikely to exceed 5% of those associated with smoked tobacco products and may well be substantially lower than this figure”. The main English government public health agency, Public Health England, said that “stating that vaping is at least 95% less harmful than smoking remains a good way to communicate the large difference in relative risk”. None of these bodies, or the experts advising them, has any connection to the e-cigarette or tobacco industries. In each case, the experts based their view on a comprehensive published review of the evidence.

3. Do the recent cases of severe lung injury and deaths prove that e-cigarettes are harmful?

No, definitely not. These cases have gained worldwide publicity, but they are completely unrelated to normal nicotine e-liquids and e-cigarettes. The cases occurred in users of illegal cannabis vaping products and were caused by use of a particular additive used for thickening cannabis (THC) oils – Vitamin E Acetate. It is possible other additives were also involved. This cannot be used in nicotine-based e-liquid and would serve no purpose. The lung injury cases are a tragedy, but they are caused by the illegal supply of cannabis vapes and provide no basis for changing policy on e-cigarettes. They do, however, provide a warning about creating black markets by banning products – and that would be an additions risk of bans on e-cigarettes or flavours: a black market will develop.

4. Do e-cigarettes help people quit smoking?

Yes. In the Philippines, 24% of adults (42% of men) smoke. All are at serious risk of cancer, heart disease, or COPD. There are now four strands of evidence that suggest e-cigarettes are effective in helping people to quit smoking: (1) evidence from randomised controlled trials; (2) observational studies (watching what happens when people use e-cigarettes); (3) population data (unusually rapid reductions in smoking prevalence and cigarette sales), and; (4) the testimonials of users who have struggled to quit using other methods. All four point towards e-cigarettes displacing smoking.

5 Do e-cigarettes appeal to adolescents?

Most adult or illicit products or behaviours will appeal to some adolescents – this applies to alcohol, drugs, gambling, pornography etc. There has been a recent rapid increase in e-cigarette use by American adolescents. But the definition used includes anyone taking one puff in the past 30 days before the survey. Drilling down into this data shows most US teen vaping is infrequent. Among frequent users, the vast majority had already smoked and for them, e-cigarettes may be beneficial. Amongst users with no prior tobacco use, there is little sign of adolescent vaping causing addiction.

6. Should e-cigarettes be banned?

No, absolutely not. This would prevent smokers (of any age) accessing much less risky alternatives to cigarettes, protect the cigarette trade from disruptive competition, and cause more disease and death. It would also put legitimate suppliers out of business, create a large black market and stimulate international internet trade. If nicotine is a legal drug, like alcohol or caffeine, then policymakers should be encouraging the least risky options to use it – not banning it to create a monopoly for the most dangerous nicotine products, cigarettes.

7. Should flavours be banned to stop youth vaping?

No. E-cigarettes are inherently flavoured products. Banning all or most flavours would be like banning all or most toppings on pizzas – it would effectively prohibit all or most of the products, leaving only the unattractive base or tobacco-flavoured liquids. This would make e-cigarettes nearly useless as alternatives to smoking for adults, promote a black market and may even increase risks to young people if it encourages them to smoke or to access black markets. It may make sense to ban certain flavour descriptors (the names given to flavours), if these are designed to appeal to youth.

8 Should limits on the strength of nicotine be imposed?

No. The danger of limiting nicotine is that it leaves cigarettes in place as the most rapid and effective way of delivering nicotine. Such limits will make e-cigarettes ineffective alternatives for heavier smokers or those struggling to convert from smoking to vaping. It also may be a block on current and future innovation (e.g. to make products safer, smaller, easier to use) and make them more dangerous by forcing users to consume more liquid for a given dose of nicotine. Limits should only be set for poison-safety reasons (for example 7.2% or approximately 72mg/ml is a poison threshold in the UK) and not to limit nicotine uptake as this would provide an advantage to cigarettes.

9. What can be done to protect young people?

Regulations to protect youth should always be targeted at youth and not indiscriminately affect adults (for example through flavour bans, nicotine limits, blanket advertising bans, or taxes). There are three main legitimate policy approaches to protect young people:
(1) control access by setting age limits and restricting where and how products can be purchased;
(2) control marketing, packaging and branding to prevent marketing targeted at adolescents;
(3) provide campaigns, information and warnings targeted at young people.

10. What the right approach to regulating e-cigarettes?

Regulation of tobacco and nicotine products should be “risk-proportionate” – with more stringent controls placed on the highest risk products. This means:
(1) high taxes on cigarettes, but low or no taxes on e-cigarettes;
(2) bans on cigarette advertising, but controls on content and placement of e-cigarette advertising to prevent marketing to teens;
(3) bans on smoking in public places, but vaping policy should be a decision for the owners or managers of buildings;
(4) large graphic health warnings on cigarettes, but messages encouraging switching on e-cigarettes;
(5) plain-packaging for cigarettes, but not e-cigarettes;
(6) regulation of product formulation that makes switching to vaping relatively more attractive than continuing to smoke;
(7) differential age restrictions, for example, age 21 for cigarettes, but 18 for e-cigarettes;
(8) bans on internet sales of cigarettes, but not on e-cigarettes;
(9) campaigns to discourage smoking, but to encourage switching.

11. Should there be a special tax on e-cigarettes?

No. In any country with high rates of smoking, most vapers will be using e-cigarettes to cut down or quit smoking – they are doing this on their own initiative and at their own expense to improve their own health. Policymakers should be trying to make this as economically attractive as possible by using taxes to maintain a difference in the cost of vaping and smoking. At this stage, the priority is to reduce smoking as deeply and as rapidly as possible and a tax on e-cigarettes would slow that down, protect the cigarette trade, and increase the burdens of disease and premature death.

12. Should e-cigarettes be regulated like cigarettes?

No. Cigarettes are likely to be at least twenty times as harmful as e-cigarettes and e-cigarettes can help people quit smoking. For these two reasons alone, the policy needs to take account of difference in risk and the potentially large benefits of e-cigarettes. The aim should be to encourage switching from cigarettes to e-cigarettes while controlling safety risks and preventing youth uptake of all tobacco and nicotine products.

13. Should vaping be banned by law in public places and workplaces?

No. There is a case to ban indoor smoking as there is some science showing that second-hand cigarette smoke is harmful to bystanders. However, e-cigarette vapour is quite different chemically and physically. The evidence suggests vaping creates exposures far below thresholds that would be allowed for occupational health limits. The force of law should be reserved for protecting people from material harm caused by others. Vaping may still be disagreeable to some people, but it is primarily a matter of etiquette and respect for the preferences of others. E-cigarette policy should be decided, therefore, by the owners and managers of premises (hotels, bars, restaurants, shops, transportation, offices, public buildings etc). The hospitality industry may be more open to vaping and to welcome vapers, but public buildings will be most likely to prohibit it. The point is that owners and managers make the decisions that are right for them and their clientele.

14. Should e-cigarette sales be restricted to people aged 18 and over?

Yes, probably. It is widely held that under-18s should not be using any tobacco or nicotine products and therefore it should be against the law to sell such products to them. Though this is necessary to reassure parents and to give legitimacy to products and an industry aimed at adults, it may have possible unintended consequences. There is some evidence that when e-cigarette age restrictions were introduced in the United States, there was a relative increase in teenage cigarette smoking. It is possible that under-18s benefit from e-cigarettes by displacing or not initiating smoking and therefore that making them more difficult to access could be a source of unintended harm.

15. Are e-cigarettes a tobacco industry ploy to keep people smoking?

No. Modern e-cigarettes were not invented by the tobacco industry and there are thousands of suppliers who are not part of the tobacco industry. The tobacco industry has realised that its customers want to switch to these products and has entered the market. The industry deserves to be mistrusted and should always be handled with caution. However, it is positive that the industry is marketing low-risk alternatives to its core product, the cigarette. A long-term transition of the industry from selling combustible products to non-combustible is in the interests of public health and is the most likely and rapid way to end the worldwide epidemic of smoking-related disease.

Full Philippines submission

The full submission (PDF) table of contents is below.

1 Questions and answers – rapid responses
2 There is broad support for tobacco harm reduction as a public health strategy
3 The recent outbreak of serious lung injuries in the United States is not due to conventional e-cigarettes and should not form a basis for e-cigarette policy
4 Youth use of e-cigarettes is more complex and poor policies can cause harm to youth
5 Limiting the nicotine level in e-cigarettes will cause more harm than good
6 Prohibitions of e-cigarettes or most e-cigarette flavours would create black markets, lead to more dangerous products, and protect the cigarette trade
7 Safety – is it fair to say to say “e-cigarettes have 95% lower risk than smoking”?
8 Policy proposals – regulating e-cigarettes with risk-proportionate regulation
9 Checklist of plausible unintended consequences of excessive regulation
Appendix 1: Commentary about tobacco harm reduction in The Lancet
Appendix 2: Letter from 72 experts to the Director-General of WHO supporting tobacco harm reduction

The situation in the Philippines

The situation is pretty dire.  See this report from the Daily Mail: Philippines bans e-cigarettes and orders police to immediately begin arresting anyone seen vaping in public.  The debate has been stirred up by comments by President Duterte (tweet thread) in a CNN interview.

Источник: https://clivebates.com/vaping-policy-rapid-questions-and-answers/

What Are The Side Effects of Vaping?

Vaping flavored e-liquid from an electronic cigarette

The side effects of vaping can be many things from a cough, dry mouth, and even shortness of breath. These are the most commonly reported side effects from long-term vapers, although some vapers never experience these side effects. The longer-term side effects of vaping are not yet known, as few, if any, long-term studies exist to examine the problem.

Table of Contents

  1. What Are the Negative Impacts of Vaping?
  2. Vaping Risks
  3. Potential Side Effects of Vaping
  4. How Vaping Affect Your Body
  5. Does Vaping Cause Long-Term Damage?
  6. Vaping: Incidents & Usage
  7. How to Stop Side Effects of Vaping
  8. Other Health Risks of Vaping
  9. How Harmful Is Secondhand Smoke?
  10. Vaping & Addiction
  11. Frequently Asked Questions
  12. Final Thoughts

Table of Contents

  1. What Are the Negative Impacts of Vaping?
  2. Vaping Risks
  3. Potential Side Effects of Vaping
  4. How Vaping Affect Your Body
  5. Does Vaping Cause Long-Term Damage?
  6. Vaping: Incidents & Usage
  7. How to Stop Side Effects of Vaping
  8. Other Health Risks of Vaping
  9. How Harmful Is Secondhand Smoke?
  10. Vaping & Addiction
  11. Frequently Asked Questions
  12. Final Thoughts

Recent scientific research is uncovering some more serious side effects of vaping. For example, research conducted at the UNC Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, shows vaping has the same effect as smoking when it comes to suppressing immune genes.

Side effects of vaping are:

  • Dry mouth
  • Dizziness
  • A cough
  • Dry skin
  • Itchiness
  • Dry eyes
  • Insomnia (mainly a quitting side effect)
  • Nosebleeds
  • Bleeding

Like any other substance, this is not a complete list of vaping side effects. But, on the other hand, indeed, some users never experience any of these uncomfortable problems.

Recent scientific research is uncovering some more serious side effects of vaping. For example, research conducted at the UNC Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, shows vaping has the same effect as smoking when it comes to suppressing immune genes.

Side effects of vaping are:

  • Dry mouth
  • Dizziness
  • A cough
  • Dry skin
  • Itchiness
  • Dry eyes
  • Insomnia (mainly a quitting side effect)
  • Nosebleeds
  • Bleeding

Like any other substance, this is not a complete list of vaping side effects. But, on the other hand, indeed, some users never experience any of these uncomfortable problems.

Is Vaping Bad For You?

It is a fact that when you introduce any substance into the human body to which it is not accustomed, there can be side effects. So, no matter if you inhale, ingest or even just touch certain chemical substances, your body will show certain adverse effects.

E-liquids used for vaping are no different. But, unfortunately, even the safest foods we eat can sometimes result in side effects!

E-liquids contain three major components, including a VG/PG base, nicotine, and flavoring. These are either chemicals or substances derived through chemical processes.

Therefore, it means that vaping will have certain side effects, which can range from temporarily dry mouth to serious health issues. If there is nicotine in the e-juice, then that also adds another dimension to some of the side effects. Particularly if the user had never smoked a cigarette or had any other exposure to nicotine.

It is a fact that when you introduce any substance into the human body to which it is not accustomed, there can be side effects. So, no matter if you inhale, ingest or even just touch certain chemical substances, your body will show certain adverse effects.

E-liquids used for vaping are no different. But, unfortunately, even the safest foods we eat can sometimes result in side effects!

E-liquids contain three major components, including a VG/PG base, nicotine, and flavoring. These are either chemicals or substances derived through chemical processes.

Therefore, it means that vaping will have certain side effects, which can range from temporarily dry mouth to serious health issues. If there is nicotine in the e-juice, then that also adds another dimension to some of the side effects. Particularly if the user had never smoked a cigarette or had any other exposure to nicotine.

Although it has a long history, its surge in popularity is a relatively new thing. We are talking about e-cigs and other clever vaporizers. Like other new habit-forming behaviors, such as Internet addiction or tanning dependency, this is a recent subject of research.

Amazingly, you can still find many studies on vaping. A worldwide survey gives more insights on its beneficial and negative effects in people’s minds. Some of the research report the adverse effects in current and former smokers are:

  • Dry mouth
  • Sore mouth
  • Headache
  • Tongue inflammation
  • Black tongue
  • Dizziness
  • Sleepiness
  • Sleeplessness
  • Allergies
  • Chest pain
  • Breathing problems

We can also observe some changes in some users’ emotional state, sexual performance and memory. Another study shows that the short-term effects that vaping has on the lungs are similar to the ones from smoking. Data shows some of the adverse side effects may entirely or partially resolve over time. It depends on various individual factors and the history of use.

Side effects of vaping

Although it has a long history, its surge in popularity is a relatively new thing. We are talking about e-cigs and other clever vaporizers. Like other new habit-forming behaviors, such as Internet addiction or tanning dependency, this is a recent subject of research.

Amazingly, you can still find many studies on vaping. A worldwide survey gives more insights on its beneficial and negative effects in people’s minds. Some of the research report the adverse effects in current and former smokers are:

  • Dry mouth
  • Sore mouth
  • Headache
  • Tongue inflammation
  • Black tongue
  • Dizziness
  • Sleepiness
  • Sleeplessness
  • Allergies
  • Chest pain
  • Breathing problems

We can also observe some changes in some users’ emotional state, sexual performance and memory. Another study shows that the short-term effects that vaping has on the lungs are similar to the ones from smoking. Data shows some of the adverse side effects may entirely or partially resolve over time. It depends on various individual factors and the history of use.

Side effects of vaping

Side Effects vs. Body’s Resistance to Accepting Vapor

Most of the side effects of vaping are usually temporary and nothing but an initial reaction by the body to vapor. Overall, when your body becomes regular to it, the side effects usually disappear within a few hours or days at most.

Lack of Long-Term Data

We are unaware of the long-term negative effects of vaping on the human body.

Most of the side effects of vaping are usually temporary and nothing but an initial reaction by the body to vapor. Overall, when your body becomes regular to it, the side effects usually disappear within a few hours or days at most.

Lack of Long-Term Data

We are unaware of the long-term negative effects of vaping on the human body.

Negative side effects are a fact, but the vaporizer seems more harmless when you compare it to smoking. Let’s explore the relation between chronic diseases and vaping. The majority of users with chronic diseases report improvement in their condition after switching from smoking to vaping.

These conditions include hypertension, diabetes, asthma, and chronic obstructive lung disease. The public health social scientist Gerry Stimson confirms those results.

Negative side effects are a fact, but the vaporizer seems more harmless when you compare it to smoking. Let’s explore the relation between chronic diseases and vaping. The majority of users with chronic diseases report improvement in their condition after switching from smoking to vaping.

These conditions include hypertension, diabetes, asthma, and chronic obstructive lung disease. The public health social scientist Gerry Stimson confirms those results.

Can My Vape Explode?

Some of the negative side effects of vaping may be because of improper usage. Vape explosions are some of the common incidents that can be very dangerous. Therefore, always familiarize yourself with the structure of your vapes and the nicotine levels in them.

Also, never forget that ingesting nicotine can be lethal. That’s why always keep your vaporizers away from kids and pets. If some pure nicotine falls on your skin, do not lick it but wash it off.

Some of the negative side effects of vaping may be because of improper usage. Vape explosions are some of the common incidents that can be very dangerous. Therefore, always familiarize yourself with the structure of your vapes and the nicotine levels in them.

Also, never forget that ingesting nicotine can be lethal. That’s why always keep your vaporizers away from kids and pets. If some pure nicotine falls on your skin, do not lick it but wash it off.

Can Vaping Cause Chest Pains?

chest pain from vaping

There can be various causes of chest pain from vaping.

Regardless of the cause, chest pain is not a minor problem and signifies a more serious health problem.

If you are experiencing chest pain and it seems to be the result of vaping, change the device power, nicotine content, reduce the level of nicotine, change the vaporizer (coil) or stop vaping for a while. First, try changing all the settings. Then, if that doesn’t clear things up, consult a doctor.

Can Vaping Cause Chest Pains?

chest pain from vaping

There can be various causes of chest pain from vaping.

Regardless of the cause, chest pain is not a minor problem and signifies a more serious health problem.

If you are experiencing chest pain and it seems to be the result of vaping, change the device power, nicotine content, reduce the level of nicotine, change the vaporizer (coil) or stop vaping for a while. First, try changing all the settings. Then, if that doesn’t clear things up, consult a doctor.

Fortunately, you can eliminate most side effects of vaping or at least reduce them by taking simple precautionary measures. Since there can be different reasons for different effects, let’s talk about each of them one by one.

Fortunately, you can eliminate most side effects of vaping or at least reduce them by taking simple precautionary measures. Since there can be different reasons for different effects, let’s talk about each of them one by one.

Dry Mouth and Skin Issues

Dehydration due to vaping can cause dry mouth or dry throat, itchy, flaky, and red skin, and several other effects. Vapor has the nature to attract water molecules from the surroundings, and you will feel it in your mouth.

If you experience any of these issues, drinking plenty of fluids can dramatically minimize the condition. Some of these effects might be a blessing in disguise, e.g. dry skin in the case of people who have very oily skin. However, staying hydrated is still essential.

Dry Mouth and Skin Issues

Dehydration due to vaping can cause dry mouth or dry throat, itchy, flaky, and red skin, and several other effects. Vapor has the nature to attract water molecules from the surroundings, and you will feel it in your mouth.

If you experience any of these issues, drinking plenty of fluids can dramatically minimize the condition. Some of these effects might be a blessing in disguise, e.g. dry skin in the case of people who have very oily skin. However, staying hydrated is still essential.

Dizziness

Excessive nicotine intake can cause dizziness. If you’re feeling dizzy, you are probably taking more nicotine than your body can handle. This effect is commonly associated with sub-ohm when large plumes of vapor are entering your body. Luckily, fixing this issue is just a matter of switching to e-liquid with a lower nicotine strength or vaping at a higher resistance.

Dizziness

Excessive nicotine intake can cause dizziness. If you’re feeling dizzy, you are probably taking more nicotine than your body can handle. This effect is commonly associated with sub-ohm when large plumes of vapor are entering your body. Luckily, fixing this issue is just a matter of switching to e-liquid with a lower nicotine strength or vaping at a higher resistance.

Caffeine Sensitivity

Many people who switch to vaping, feel subtle withdrawals and tend to drink more coffee or other caffeinated drinks. Early days of using a vaporizer can cause caffeine sensitivity and result in anxiety and mood swings. Just reduce your intake of caffeine, and all these symptoms will quickly dissipate.

Caffeine Sensitivity

Many people who switch to vaping, feel subtle withdrawals and tend to drink more coffee or other caffeinated drinks. Early days of using a vaporizer can cause caffeine sensitivity and result in anxiety and mood swings. Just reduce your intake of caffeine, and all these symptoms will quickly dissipate.

Allergies

As we mentioned earlier, almost all e-juices come with a PG/VG base. Despite being considered “generally safe” by the FDA, PG can trigger a few allergies. VG, on the other hand, is derived from vegetables and goes easy on your system. So, if you’re using high PG e-liquids and experience allergies, switching to high VG e-liquid can be helpful.

Allergies

As we mentioned earlier, almost all e-juices come with a PG/VG base. Despite being considered “generally safe” by the FDA, PG can trigger a few allergies. VG, on the other hand, is derived from vegetables and goes easy on your system. So, if you’re using high PG e-liquids and experience allergies, switching to high VG e-liquid can be helpful.

Canker Sores

Canker sores (don’t confuse them with cold sores) are small, shallow blisters inside the mouth; the cause has several reasons: injury to the mouth, vitamin deficiency, acidic and spicy foods, and hormone disorders, stress, and vaping.

However, vapor or e-liquids don’t have anything to do with canker sores, but failure to keep the mouthpiece clean is the issue. Anything you put into your mouth should always be clean, especially the e-cig mouthpiece that tends to accumulate a lot of gunk.

Canker Sores

Canker sores (don’t confuse them with cold sores) are small, shallow blisters inside the mouth; the cause has several reasons: injury to the mouth, vitamin deficiency, acidic and spicy foods, and hormone disorders, stress, and vaping.

However, vapor or e-liquids don’t have anything to do with canker sores, but failure to keep the mouthpiece clean is the issue. Anything you put into your mouth should always be clean, especially the e-cig mouthpiece that tends to accumulate a lot of gunk.

Proven Researches About Vaping Risks

Scientists don’t seem to be on the same page when it comes to the dangers of vaping. For instance, there is a claim that electronic cigarettes are at least 95% less harmful than tobacco cigarettes. This is according to an expert independent review published by the Public Health England.

On the other hand, a Harvard study claims there are many dangers of vaping that make it nearly as devastating as smoking. The study showed that several flavorings tested had chemicals, including pentanedione and acetone. They can be extremely dangerous for human lungs. These chemicals can damage the lungs’ airways. In addition, they can cause severe respiratory diseases.

But as we mentioned earlier, the sponsors of these studies can be companies that have an agenda. What’s more, some can be even misleading. For example, you can find high levels of formaldehyde, a known carcinogen, in the vapor. This is according to a recent study by five scientists from Portland State University.

However, when you closely look at the study, you will notice something strange. They released formaldehyde into the vapor at ridiculously high temperatures. As a matter of fact, nobody vapes at such high temperatures. It’s because you get a burnt, dry taste which every vaper hates.

We need more, better and concrete studies. Since vaping has become popular over the last eight years, or so. Also, there is no long-term data available. We don’t know how vaping will affect those who have done it for more than two decades. This is why scientists are having trouble providing answers to many questions.

Scientists don’t seem to be on the same page when it comes to the dangers of vaping. For instance, there is a claim that electronic cigarettes are at least 95% less harmful than tobacco cigarettes. This is according to an expert independent review published by the Public Health England.

On the other hand, a Harvard study claims there are many dangers of vaping that make it nearly as devastating as smoking. The study showed that several flavorings tested had chemicals, including pentanedione and acetone. They can be extremely dangerous for human lungs. These chemicals can damage the lungs’ airways. In addition, they can cause severe respiratory diseases.

But as we mentioned earlier, the sponsors of these studies can be companies that have an agenda. What’s more, some can be even misleading. For example, you can find high levels of formaldehyde, a known carcinogen, in the vapor. This is according to a recent study by five scientists from Portland State University.

However, when you closely look at the study, you will notice something strange. They released formaldehyde into the vapor at ridiculously high temperatures. As a matter of fact, nobody vapes at such high temperatures. It’s because you get a burnt, dry taste which every vaper hates.

We need more, better and concrete studies. Since vaping has become popular over the last eight years, or so. Also, there is no long-term data available. We don’t know how vaping will affect those who have done it for more than two decades. This is why scientists are having trouble providing answers to many questions.

Is secondhand exposure dangerous?

The main difference between smoking and vaping is that there’s no burning of any substances in vaping. Therefore, there’s no combustion. As a consequence, it is not so dangerous to the people around us and the environment.

However, studies show that various toxic substances are released during vaping. And that’s why they should implement more legal restrictions.

The main difference between smoking and vaping is that there’s no burning of any substances in vaping. Therefore, there’s no combustion. As a consequence, it is not so dangerous to the people around us and the environment.

However, studies show that various toxic substances are released during vaping. And that’s why they should implement more legal restrictions.

Secondhand Exposure & Risks

Although there’s no carbon emission in vaping, some researchers believe that secondhand exposure can be harmful. The allergist Chitra Dinakar reports that children are more sensitive to toxic substances. Doing studies that involve exposing someone to dangerous and harmful substances is not ethical. As a result, we cannot report some of the other negative effects of e-cigs.

The truth is that studies have actually found many toxic ingredients in the vapor. Some of them can even cause cancer. Therefore, we need strict restrictions on age and indoor and outdoor areas.
In addition, we need more studies on the consequences of secondhand exposure. It is especially important concerning pregnant women and people with heart problems.

Secondhand Exposure & Risks

Although there’s no carbon emission in vaping, some researchers believe that secondhand exposure can be harmful. The allergist Chitra Dinakar reports that children are more sensitive to toxic substances. Doing studies that involve exposing someone to dangerous and harmful substances is not ethical. As a result, we cannot report some of the other negative effects of e-cigs.

The truth is that studies have actually found many toxic ingredients in the vapor. Some of them can even cause cancer. Therefore, we need strict restrictions on age and indoor and outdoor areas.
In addition, we need more studies on the consequences of secondhand exposure. It is especially important concerning pregnant women and people with heart problems.

What Is the Addiction of Vaping?

Like with any other habit, vaping can lead to addiction. Even pulling your hair as a compulsive need can become an annoying routine. Psychological dependence on vaping also has an effect. Sometimes the habit itself is addictive and can lead to withdrawal symptoms when a habitual vaper cannot vape. It isn’t always necessary for there to be a drug involved.

With the popularity of vaping in mind, some health charities are concerned that many minors might decide to start. Always educate your children or younger siblings about possible health dangers and risks of addiction. Nicotine can have serious side effects on the developing brain of a teenager. It is definitely best to make sure that a teen never starts vaping at all, but especially if the e-juice contains nicotine.

Like with any other habit, vaping can lead to addiction. Even pulling your hair as a compulsive need can become an annoying routine. Psychological dependence on vaping also has an effect. Sometimes the habit itself is addictive and can lead to withdrawal symptoms when a habitual vaper cannot vape. It isn’t always necessary for there to be a drug involved.

With the popularity of vaping in mind, some health charities are concerned that many minors might decide to start. Always educate your children or younger siblings about possible health dangers and risks of addiction. Nicotine can have serious side effects on the developing brain of a teenager. It is definitely best to make sure that a teen never starts vaping at all, but especially if the e-juice contains nicotine.

What Are The Dangers of Vaping?

A lot of research is currently underway to find out more negative side effects of vaping, but it will be a while before we get to see the results. Vaping side effects can be from short-term, minor issues to something so severe that you might have to stop vaping – through the latter is extremely rare. Therefore, we recommend keeping an eye on your health when you switch to vaping and immediately consult your doctor if you notice the serious side effects of vaping.

A lot of research is currently underway to find out more negative side effects of vaping, but it will be a while before we get to see the results. Vaping side effects can be from short-term, minor issues to something so severe that you might have to stop vaping – through the latter is extremely rare. Therefore, we recommend keeping an eye on your health when you switch to vaping and immediately consult your doctor if you notice the serious side effects of vaping.

Frequently Asked Questions

What happens to your lungs if you vape everyday?

There is currently not enough information to say what happens to a person’s lungs if they vape everyday. Vaping is not as harmful as smoking cigarettes, but the outbreak of vaping-related lung illnesses made people aware that illegal, unregulated devices could cause serious injury.

But there is not enough long-term data on nicotine vaping to say what happens to a person’s lungs who vapes everyday.

How do you tell if your lungs are damaged from vaping?

If you feel a tightness in your chest or shortness of breath, they could be signs of a respiratory problem, although whether vaping is the culprit or something else should be considered by a doctor. If you are a vaper and begin to feel any of these symptoms you should stop vaping immediately and consult with a medical professional.

Can vaping cause inflammation in the chest?

Inflammation in the chest is a typical symptom of vaping-related illnesses or regular vaping, but it is not always an indicator of serious disease. If you do begin to feel a tightness or soreness in your chest, it’s best to stop vaping and see a doctor immediately.

What are wet lung symptoms?

Wet lung (or acute respiratory distress syndrome) symptoms include difficulty breathing, coughing, blue, palish skin, fatigue, and dizziness.

How long does it take for the effects of vaping to wear off?

The side effects of vaping start to wear off after two weeks of stopping vaping. If someone continues to vape during this time, it will take longer for them to feel the effects like clearer, deeper breathing, less to no coughing, and better overall lung function.

How do lungs heal from vaping?

Lungs will heal from vaping by producing a cough that clears the airways of chemicals, bacteria and other particles, while the lungs also heal on their own after vaping cessation. Stopping vaping is the best way to begin the healing process for your lungs if you are experiencing one of the side effects of vaping.

Is JUULing the same as vaping?

JUULing is a type of vaping, yes, with the Juul device. The Juul is a portable e-cigarette that looks like a USB flash drive. They are popular for their ease of use and discreteness but the Juul is also blamed for the rise in teenage vaping and has since been restricted to only two flavors.

Is it OK to vape without nicotine?

Vaping without nicotine is fine and it is often recommended that people who smoke and try vaping to help them quit should wean themselves off of nicotine entirely. Many e-liquid manufacturers also offer their e-juices with a non-nicotine option.

Is vaping the same as smoking e-cigarettes?

No, vaping is not the same as smoking. Vaping involves someone inhaling the aerosol produced by heating an e-liquid. Smoking is the burning of processed tobacco, which releases over 7,000 different chemicals with every inhale.

What happens to your lungs if you vape everyday?

There is currently not enough information to say what happens to a person’s lungs if they vape everyday. Vaping is not as harmful as smoking cigarettes, but the outbreak of vaping-related lung illnesses made people aware that illegal, unregulated devices could cause serious injury.

But there is not enough long-term data on nicotine vaping to say what happens to a person’s lungs who vapes everyday.

How do you tell if your lungs are damaged from vaping?

If you feel a tightness in your chest or shortness of breath, they could be signs of a respiratory problem, although whether vaping is the culprit or something else should be considered by a doctor. If you are a vaper and begin to feel any of these symptoms you should stop vaping immediately and consult with a medical professional.

Can vaping cause inflammation in the chest?

Inflammation in the chest is a typical symptom of vaping-related illnesses or regular vaping, but it is not always an indicator of serious disease. If you do begin to feel a tightness or soreness in your chest, it’s best to stop vaping and see a doctor immediately.

What are wet lung symptoms?

Wet lung (or acute respiratory distress syndrome) symptoms include difficulty breathing, coughing, blue, palish skin, fatigue, and dizziness.

How long does it take for the effects of vaping to wear off?

The side effects of vaping start to wear off after two weeks of stopping vaping. If someone continues to vape during this time, it will take longer for them to feel the effects like clearer, deeper breathing, less to no coughing, and better overall lung function.

How do lungs heal from vaping?

Lungs will heal from vaping by producing a cough that clears the airways of chemicals, bacteria and other particles, while the lungs also heal on their own after vaping cessation. Stopping vaping is the best way to begin the healing process for your lungs if you are experiencing one of the side effects of vaping.

Is JUULing the same as vaping?

JUULing is a type of vaping, yes, with the Juul device. The Juul is a portable e-cigarette that looks like a USB flash drive. They are popular for their ease of use and discreteness but the Juul is also blamed for the rise in teenage vaping and has since been restricted to only two flavors.

Is it OK to vape without nicotine?

Vaping without nicotine is fine and it is often recommended that people who smoke and try vaping to help them quit should wean themselves off of nicotine entirely. Many e-liquid manufacturers also offer their e-juices with a non-nicotine option.

Is vaping the same as smoking e-cigarettes?

No, vaping is not the same as smoking. Vaping involves someone inhaling the aerosol produced by heating an e-liquid. Smoking is the burning of processed tobacco, which releases over 7,000 different chemicals with every inhale.

Inhaling anything other than air into your lungs is not recommended for anyone. Vapers should be aware that although there are less risks associated with vaping, compared to smoking, that does not mean that there are no risks. Vapers can still experience side effects like coughing, shortness of breath, and lung irritation.

Vapers should always buy e-liquids that do not contain harmful chemicals like diacetyl. They should also never buy e-liquids from black market operators or anyone who is not associated with a trusted and recognized brand.

Inhaling anything other than air into your lungs is not recommended for anyone. Vapers should be aware that although there are less risks associated with vaping, compared to smoking, that does not mean that there are no risks. Vapers can still experience side effects like coughing, shortness of breath, and lung irritation.

Vapers should always buy e-liquids that do not contain harmful chemicals like diacetyl. They should also never buy e-liquids from black market operators or anyone who is not associated with a trusted and recognized brand.

Published: April 21, 2017Updated: October 29, 2021


Источник: https://vapingdaily.com/what-is-vaping/vaping-side-effects/

The Real Dangers of Vaping Are Only Now Beginning to Be Understood

Let’s start with some good news: Fewer teenagers are smoking than ever before. According to a January 2019 report from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the number of teens who smoke cigarettes daily has dropped 88 percent since the mid-1990s. But, as we all know from the cloudy corners on the outskirts of high schools, more teens are flirting with the dangers of vaping instead. Today, a whopping 21 percent of high schoolers use e-cigarettes, up from just 1.5 percent in 2011, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For middle-school kids, vaping rates rose from 0.6 percent in 2011 to 4.9 percent last year, a 49 percent increase over 2017.

At least they’ve done away with those foul-smelling cancer sticks, right? At first, experts thought so. In fact, vaping was promoted for years as a less-harmful step towards quitting smoking. The usually sweet-smelling vapors were thought to be a lot better than tobacco and chemicals set on fire.

We were wrong.

“Our understanding of e-cigarettes is still accumulating, but at this point, we are pretty confident that e-cigarettes are at least two-thirds to three-fourths as bad as cigarettes,” says Stanton Glantz, Ph.D., professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco’s Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education. “And remember, cigarettes are pretty horrible. Vaping is like, instead of jumping out of the 40th story of a building, you’re jumping out of the 30th story.”

Other experts think Glantz is being conservative. Thanks to new chemical cocktails, the increased nicotine delivery, and the power of that drug on the brain (all the worse in concentrated form), Juuls and other e-cigarettes may in fact be worse than your average cancer stick.

Here’s a look at what the experts now know — and why those headlines of hospitalized teens from nicotine toxicity and vaping-related lung troubles may be just the beginning.

The Clear and Present Dangers of Vaping

This summer saw the various nefarious effects of vaping play out in the news over and over. In July alone, eight teenagers in Wisconsin were hospitalized for serious lung damage caused by vaping, some of whom had to be put on ventilators in the intensive care unit. During the first week of August, four Minnesota teens were hospitalized for a week or longer because of vaping-related lung troubles, prompting the state’s health department to issue a warning against e-cigarettes.

Also, this summer, an 18-year-old Florida college student’s lung collapsed — something virtually unheard of in someone so young — after he’d been using a Juul vaping device daily for a couple of years. And just this month, the Food and Drug Administration announced it has received 127 reports of seizures and other serious neurological symptoms linked to vaping since 2009.

“With the data we should have about three or four years from now, I think we’ll find that e-cigarettes are equally as bad or worse in terms of overall health risks.”

Seizures? Lungs collapsing? Nicotine toxicity? These are not things one would hear about when cigarette smoking was the norm. Vaporized nicotine is a different danger. When it comes to lung health, look to the great array of chemicals that Juul and e-cigarettes require to make them work properly. In other words, that vapor is in no way just sweet-smelling water — it’s a huge assortment of chemicals going straight to your lungs.

Then, there are the brain issues, the epidemic of “nic sick” teens who experience nausea, headaches, lightheadedness, and even vomiting. This is due to this especially concentrated form of nicotine that you don’t get in regular cigarettes. The FDA is playing catchup now on regulating e-cigarettes in their many forms. Meanwhile, researchers are pointing to increasingly worrisome evidence of the kinds of harms Juul and its brethren can make. It’s a race that, many worry, will end with more teens and adults in the hospital before all is said and done.

“Nic Sick,” Nicotine Salt, and the Dangers of Vaping

The dangers of combustible cigarettes are well-documented. Cigarettes consist of roughly 7,000 chemicals, according to the National Cancer Institute, 69 of which are proven carcinogens. Along with nicotine, cigarette chemicals include hydrogen cyanide, lead, arsenic, ammonia, benzene, and carbon monoxide, and most are found in tar, the nasty residue left behind from burning tobacco.

Is nicotine bad for you? Yes. Nicotine itself is highly problematic. First and foremost, it’s crazy-addictive because it changes the brain. “Nicotine mimics the chemicals that brain cells use to communicate with each other and causes the brain to reconfigure itself,” Glantz says. “The nicotine molecule is shaped a lot like acetylcholine, which the nervous system uses to communicate, so it fakes out and overstimulates the nervous system.”

The brain responds to this, he explains, by growing additional nicotine receptors. And with more receptors, the body craves more nicotine. Without it, withdrawal sets in, causing jitters, anxiety, headaches, and irritability. “This rewiring of the brain is bad for adults, but it’s especially bad for young people because until around age 26, the brain is still developing,” Stantz says. “When you start messing up normal communication between nerves as the system is still being built, the adaptations are a lot more permanent.”

Looking strictly at the nicotine factor, e-cigarettes can be even worse than traditional cigs because they tend to deliver even more of the stimulant. With newer vaping devices, unlike first-generation e-cigarettes, nicotine levels can be controlled, either by adjusting the contraption itself or purchasing e-juices of varying concentrations. Regardless, they still tend to push out more nicotine than old-school smoke.

For this reason, Stantz calls out Juul devices as particularly dangerous. “Free-base nicotine, which you get in a cigarette and an older-generation e-cigarette, is very alkaline and hard to inhale, so it triggers a gag reflex, which limits the amount of nicotine per puff,” he says. “Juul transitioned to nicotine salt and added some acid to the e-liquid to make it less alkaline, as well as adding flavors. When you put all that together, it is much easier to inhale, so Juul devices deliver a much higher dose per puff.”

This may be why kids seem to be getting addicted to Juul much faster than they got hooked on traditional cigarettes and even older e-cigarettes.

The Other Dangers of Vaping: Heavy Metals and Formaldehyde

But there are many more issues with vaping than just the nicotine. While research shows e-cigarettes contain lower levels of carcinogens than regular cigarettes, their vapor, which many users assume is harmless, is downright dangerous. “It consists of ultrafine particles that are about 100 times smaller than a human hair,” says Glantz. “These particles include acrolein and formaldehyde, as well as diacetyl, cinnamaldehyde, and other flavorants that are fine to eat but not to inhale as fine particles.”

These chemicals’ tiny size, he explains, allows them to permeate the body more deeply, making them especially toxic. Earlier this year, Harvard researchers discovered that diacetyl and its chemical cousin 2,3-pentanedione — found in 90 percent of e-cigarettes tested — damage the cilia lining the lungs and airways, increasing the risks of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

“Vaping is like, instead of jumping out of the 40th story of a building, you’re jumping out of the 30th story.”

“E-cigarettes also include heavy metals like lead and silica,” Glantz says. “Their wicks often have silica, and when they wear out, you can get little particles of silica in the lungs, which is very harmful. Additionally, e-cigarettes disable the normal functioning of macrophages, cells within the lungs that gobble up bacteria and other infectious agents we breathe in. When you disable them, you are more prone to infections.”

Also, like smoking cigarettes, vaping threatens cardiovascular health. “Our blood vessels are constantly adjusting in size depending on how much blood flow is needed, a process called flow-mediated dilation,” Glantz says. “This is controlled by nitric oxide synthase, enzymes that e-cigarette aerosol completely disables, severely compromising the arteries’ ability to expand when they need to.” This issue has been linked to long-term heart disease, he adds, and it can cause platelets to clump together, leading to heart attacks.

Overall, the evidence clearly shows vaping is exceptionally risky for and even immediately harmful to teens. As for Glantz’s estimation that e-cigarettes are 66 percent to 75 percent as hazardous as combustible cigarettes? He doesn’t believe that statement will hold up much longer: “With the data, we should have about three or four years from now, I think we’ll find that e-cigarettes are equally as bad or worse in terms of overall health risks.”

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Источник: https://www.fatherly.com/health-science/scientific-dangers-of-vaping/
Research

We’ve come a long way since the ’60s when Hollywood starlets puffed cigarettes on silver screens and parents lit up in their living rooms. Over the past 60 years, traditional cigarettes and tobacco products have been slowly exiting the cultural landscape, as use has dropped 68% among adults (American Lung Association). But on their way out, they held the door open for a new bane to pulmonologists everywhere: e-cigarettes. 

Americans, particularly young adults, have traded Marlboros and Newports for JUUL pods and vape pens. On street corners, back porches, and sidewalks across the United States, you can catch people puffing clouds of flavored vapor. There’s been plenty of discussion on the safety of e-cigarette use, and its effects on our public health. You can read any number of blogs and social media posts about the relative hazards and merits of vaping, and it’s easy to get lost in the weeds. But here you’ll find the straight stats on e-cigarettes and vaping facts. 

What is vaping?

The technical name is electronic nicotine delivery system (ENDS), which is an umbrella term that encompasses vape pens, pods, tanks, mods, and electronic cigarettes. These devices are designed to simulate cigarette or cigar smoking using aerosolized vapor instead of smoke. They employ a heating element that vaporizes a liquid (propylene glycol, glycerin, nicotine, and flavorings), allowing the user to inhale it. 

Typically, e-cigarettes have a rechargeable base—they often look like pens or USB flash drives—and disposable cartridges that contain the flavored e-liquid. So, although vape devices incorporate a heating element, there’s not actually any combustion or smoke involved. The amount of nicotine in e-cigarettes varies between brands and delivery methods, and its labeling isn’t always reliable. Because these products don’t have the same chemical aggregation of cigarettes and avoid the damaging effects of smoke, some have pitched and marketed e-cigarettes as a safer alternative to regular cigarettes. But as e-cigarette use increases, their health risks are becoming more evident. 

How popular is vaping?

The use of e-cigarettes is on the rise—but is it a passing fad or here to stay? Current vaping statistics can provide some context and help model its continued ascent.

  • As of 2018, 9% of U.S. adults said they “regularly or occasionally” vape. (Gallup, 2018)
  • In the U.S., 27.5% of high school students use vape products. (The Truth Initiative, 2019)
  • According to a 2019 survey, more than 5 million U.S. middle and high school students used e-cigarettes in the past 30 days. (U.S Food and Drug Administration, 2019)
  • Nearly 1 million youth e-cigarette users use the product daily, and 1.6 million use it more than 20 times per month. (U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 2019)

Vaping statistics worldwide

  • In 2011, there were 7 million e-cigarette users worldwide. By 2018, that number had increased to 41 million. (World Health Organization, 2018)
  • There will be an estimated 55 million e-cigarette users worldwide by 2021. (Euromonitor, 2018)
  • Worldwide vaping sales reached $15.7 billion in 2018 and they’re expected to reach $40 billion by 2023. (The Lancet, 2019)
  • The three largest markets for vaping products are the United States, the United Kingdom, and Japan. (Euromonitor, 2018)

Vaping statistics in the U.S.

  • Roughly 1 in every 20 Americans use vaping devices, and 1 in 3 users vape daily. (Annals of Internal Medicine, 2018)
  • 8% of Americans report using vaping products in the past week. (Gallup, 2019)
  • Oklahoma has the highest rate of e-cigarette usage, followed by Louisiana, Nevada, Ohio, Tennessee, and Kentucky. (CDC, 2017)
  • Washington, D.C. has the lowest rate of e-cigarette usage, followed by South Dakota, California, Maryland, and Vermont. (CDC, 2017)

Vaping statistics by age

  • 20% of Americans ages 18 to 29 use vape products, compared with 16% of those ages 30 to 64, and fewer than 0.5% among those 65 and older. (Gallup, 2018)
  • Young people ages 15 to 17 are 16 times more likely to vape than people age 25 to 34. (Truth Initiative, 2018)
  • From 2017 to 2019, the percent of high school students who vaped in the past 30 days increased among 12th graders (11% to 25%), 10th graders (8% to 20%), and 8th graders (4% to 9%). (The New England Journal of Medicine, 2019)

Teen vaping statistics

  • Youth e-cigarette use rose 1,800% from 2011 to 2019. (Truth Initiative, 2019)
  • Two-thirds of young JUUL users (ages 15 to 21) don’t know that the product always contains nicotine. (Truth Initiative, 2019)
  • In 2019, 10.5% of middle school students reported using vaping products within the past month. (CDC, 2019)
  • Around 61% of teens who vape do it “to experiment,” 42% because they like the taste, 38% to have a good time, 37% to relieve tension, and 29% to feel good or get high. (Monitoring the Future, 2019)

Vaping vs. smoking statistics

  • More than 30% of teens who start using e-cigarettes begin smoking traditional tobacco products within six months. (National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2016)
  • Only 15% of U.S. e-cigarette users are non-smokers. (Annals of Internal Medicine, 2018)
  • Young people in the U.S. are four times more likely to try cigarettes and three times more likely to smoke regularly if they’ve already used vaping products. (Truth Initiative, 2019)
  • The majority (70%) of high school cigarette smokers also use vaping products. (Surgeon General, 2020)

RELATED: The 2020 smoking report

The health effects of vaping

Many people think of vaping as a “healthy alternative” to smoking, but this isn’t necessarily the case. They might be healthier, but that doesn’t mean they’re healthy. The more we learn about e-cigarettes, the more detrimental health consequences we discover. For one, vaping products contain nicotine, which is highly addictive, so what starts as a habit can develop into serious nicotine addiction. 

  • There have been 2,807 hospitalized cases of serious lung injury associated with vaping products, resulting in 68 deaths as of February 2020. (CDC, 2020)
  • Nearly 5,000 children younger than 5 received emergency room treatment for e-liquid nicotine exposure between 2013 and 2017. (Truth Initiative, 2019)
  • A recent study on mice found that 22.5% of subjects exposed to “e-cigarette smoke” for 54 weeks had developed lung adenocarcinomas and 57.5% had developed bladder urothelial hyperplasia. (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2019)

While e-cigarettes are still a fairly new trend, studies have linked them to increased blood pressure, heart disease, gum inflammation, lung disease, brain development effects, and severe lung injury. 

RELATED: Does vaping or smoking increase your risk of getting COVID-19?

The cost of vaping

Although it’s often cheaper than traditional cigarettes, vaping isn’t cheap. Vaping can cost $387 to $5,082.50 per year whereas smoking a pack of cigarettes a day can cost $2,087.80 to $5,091.75, according to the manufacturer Ruthless Vapor. And the cost of vaping doesn’t stop at the price of the products. As mentioned above, vaping can result in serious health problems, emergencies, and hospitalizations.

  • E-cigarette and vape product sales are expected to reach more than $40 billion by 2023. (The Lancet, 2019)
  • The median cost for regular e-cigarette users is $50 to $75 per month and as high as $250 per month. (Tobacco Prevention and Cessation, 2016).
  • An emergency room visit costs $1,389 on average in 2017. (Health Care Cost Institute, 2019) Note: This is the cost of an ER visit for any reason—not just vaping-related.)
  • A three-day hospital stay costs $30,000. (Healthcare.gov) Note: This is the average cost of any hospital stay—not just vaping-related.
  • Respiratory failure and insufficiency, lung cancer, hypertension, coronary heart disease, and pneumonia (all possible vaping-related health conditions) are among the most expensive health conditions, with an average of $9,793 to $17,868 per hospital stay. (Business Insider, 2018)

Reasons why people vape

Back when vaping was first starting to gain social traction, they were, in a way, viewed as lite cigarettes. A majority of e-cigarette users were smokers attempting to make the switch, drawn to the more favorable odor, better taste, variety of flavors, as well as the perception that vaping products were safer and healthier. 

But over the years, the vaping population has gotten significantly younger. The “average vape user” is no longer a 25- to 45-year-old attempting to quit smoking. Rather, it’s a 15- to 19-year-old, a high schooler JUULing with friends while hanging out. Consequently, the reasons for vaping have changed. According to the NIH Monitoring the Future survey, these teen users vape:

  • to see what it’s like (60.9%)
  • because they like how it tastes (41.7%)
  • as a social activity (37.9%)
  • to relax (37.4%) 
  • to feel good or get high (29.0%)
  • they’re bored (28.7%)
  • because they think it looks cool (15.2%)
  • they have an addiction (8.1%) 
  • to help quit regular cigarettes (6.1%)

Of course, there’s still a large chunk of e-cigarette users that vape as an alternative to smoking, but that population seems to be shrinking. 

Vaping cessation

Vaping has been billed as a smoking cessation method, but e-cigarettes can contain just as much nicotine (and sometimes more), making them equally addictive. Because they’re more accessible and easier to use anywhere, vape products can be even harder to drop.

Anyone who has attempted to kick regular cigarettes to the curb knows that going cold turkey, while occasionally effective, is incredibly difficult. These willpower superheroes excluded, most people see better results from a gradual process.

The first step is often the simplest, but most effective: identify motivators. People who know exactly why they want to quit have a more concrete, traversable path ahead of them. An accountability network can have the same effect. Vapers with support from friends, family, and others usually find it easier to stay strong. Finding activities to replace vaping can help too, like chewing gum, sunflower seeds, or a toothpick. People attempting to quit should also know their triggers, the situations in which they’re most prone to reach for the JUUL or vape pen so that they can mentally prepare to face them. 

Nicotine withdrawal is no joke, and some people choose to wean themselves off with nicotine patches, gum, or nasal sprays. Depending on how often someone used vape products, these nicotine-replacement therapies can be effective as well. Doctors can also prescribe smoking cessation drugs like Chantix and Zyban. 

Vaping questions and answers

How many people in the world vape?

There were 41 million e-cigarette users worldwide (World Health Organization) as of 2018, and that number is expected to reach 55 million by 2021 (Euromonitor).

Which age group vapes the most?

Teens and young adults. Gallup says that 20% of people age 18 to 29 vape, compared to 9% of people age 30 to 49, 7% of people age 50 to 64, and less than 0.5% of people older than 65. And, according to the Truth Initiative, 15- to 17-year-olds are 16 times more likely to vape than 25- to 34-year-olds.  

How many teens vape?

Nearly 12% of 12th graders, 6.9% of 10th graders, and 1.9% of 8th graders vape every day, according to a National Institute of Drug Abuse survey.

What does vaping do to your lungs?

E-cigarettes produce numerous toxic chemicals that are linked to lung disease, including acetaldehyde, acrolein, formaldehyde, and various heavy metals (American Lung Association). Additionally, certain vaping products have caused more than 2,800 separate cases of severe lung injury (CDC).

Is vaping safe?

No. Even though research is ongoing, vaping has been linked to heart disease, lung disease, and severe lung injury.

Is vaping addictive?

Yes. E-cigarettes contain nicotine, a highly addictive drug. A recent CDC study found that 99% of all vaping products have nicotine—even the ones that claim to be nicotine-free.

Is vaping worse than cigarettes?

Vaping isn’t necessarily worse than cigarettes. Since it doesn’t produce smoke, it can be slightly better, but both are unhealthy. E-cigarettes still contain dangerous chemicals and ongoing research continues to link them to various diseases.

Have e-cigarettes led to an increase in tobacco usage?

No. Traditional tobacco use (particularly cigarettes), has been declining since the early 2000s. The CDC reports that cigarette smoking decreased from 20.9% in 2005 to 13.7% in 2018.

How many people worldwide have died as a direct result of vaping?

There aren’t accurate statistics on worldwide vaping deaths, but lung injury caused by vaping products has been linked to 68 deaths in the U.S. so far. However, because vaping is a relatively new trend, it may be several years before we see its long-term effects.

Vaping research:

  • What percentage of Americans vape?, Gallup
  • Vaping facts, stats, and regulations, Truth Initiative
  • The impact of e-cigarettes on the lung, American Lung Association
  • Teens and e-cigarettes, National Institute on Drug Abuse
  • Before recent outbreak, vaping was on the rise in U.S., especially among young people, Pew Research Center
  • Quick facts on the risks of e-cigarettes for kids, teens, and young adults, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  • Know the risks: e-cigarettes and young people, Surgeon General
  • Youth tobacco use: Results from the national youth tobacco survey, U.S. Food and Drug Administration
  • Trends in adolescent vaping, 2017-2019, The New England Journal of Medicine
  • New study reveals teens 16 times more likely to use JUUL than older age groups, Truth Initiative
  • Prevalence and distribution of e-cigarette use among U.S. adults, Annals of Internal Medicine
  • Vaping: a growing global health concern, The Lancet
  • A dollars and “sense” exploration of vape shop spending and e-cigarette use, Tobacco Prevention and Cessation
  • Electronic-cigarette smoke induces lung adenocarcinoma and bladder urothelial hyperplasia in mice, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
  • 10 years of emergency room spending for the commercially insured, Health Care Cost Institute
  • Protection from high medical costs, Healthcare.gov
  • Most expensive health conditions in the U.S., Business Insider
Источник: https://www.singlecare.com/blog/news/vaping-statistics/
Worldwide vaping statistics U.S. vaping statistics

The unique contribution of e-cigarettes for tobacco harm reduction in supporting smoking relapse prevention

Harm Reduction Journalvolume 15, Article number: 31 (2018) Cite this article

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Abstract

Background

We have little understanding of how vapers use e-cigarettes beyond cessation. E-cigarettes may have a role to play in reducing the health-related harms of tobacco smoking, through not only assisting smoking cessation attempts but also supporting long-term abstinence from smoking. However, there are fears that vaping may lead to the ‘renormalisation’ of smoking type behaviours. This study aimed to explore patterns of use and reported experiences of vapers quitting smoking using an e-cigarette in relation to long-term smoking status (abstinence or relapse).

Methods

A purposive sample of 40 UK vapers was matched to a sampling frame of demographic characteristics from a representative sample of UK quitters. Following full informed consent, semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted. Data were thematically analysed by two members of the research team. Final thematic analysis was verified and agreed by consensus.

Results

The sample self-reported long histories of tobacco use and multiple previous quit attempts which had eventually resulted in relapse back to smoking, although a small but important group had never before attempted to quit. Initiating e-cigarette use was experienced as a revelation for some, who were quickly able to fully switch to using e-cigarettes as an alternative to tobacco smoking. For others, periods of dual use or smoking relapse combined with attempts at vaping that were not initially satisfactory. Many of these chose a cheaper ‘cig-a-like’ device which they found to be inadequate. Experimentation with different devices and different setups, over time, resulted in some ‘sliding’ rather than switching to vaping. This involved periods of ‘dual use’. Some settled on patterns of vaping as a direct substitute of previous tobacco smoking, whereas others reported ‘grazing’ patterns of vaping throughout the day that were perceived to support tobacco smoking abstinence.

Conclusions

Our data demonstrates that e-cigarettes may be a unique harm reduction innovation for smoking relapse prevention. E-cigarettes meet the needs of some ex-smokers by substituting physical, psychological, social, cultural and identity-related aspects of tobacco addiction. Some vapers reported that they found vaping pleasurable and enjoyable—being more than a substitute but actually preferred, over time, to tobacco smoking. This clearly suggests that vaping is a viable long-term substitute for smoking, with substantial implications for tobacco harm reduction.

Background

E-cigarettes may have a role to play in reducing the health-related harms of tobacco smoking through not only assisting smoking cessation attempts but, perhaps more importantly, supporting long-term abstinence from tobacco smoking. A review of the latest available evidence suggests that e-cigarettes are at least 95% less harmful to health than tobacco smoking [1]. E-cigarettes have become the most popular aid to quitting smoking in the UK [1]. This is perhaps particularly so for the general population not wishing to seek formal support for smoking cessation from a health professional. Indeed, it is for this population of non-help seekers that the harm reduction role of e-cigarettes may be most clearly realised. There is now substantial support for vaping as a harm reduction approach and an alternative to tobacco smoking from UK Medical [2] and public health bodies [1, 3].

However, the use of e-cigarettes for smoking cessation, and particularly longer-term use, remains controversial. The UK takes a relatively permissive stance, but vaping is still banned in many countries [4]. The long-term health effects of vaping are unknown and may not be clearly recognised for many years, since most e-cigarette users are ex-smokers, and thus, disaggregating the health impact of vaping from previous smoking is difficult. Although studies are beginning to show that the health impact of vaping may be comparable to NRT use [4], there are concerns from some public health perspectives that vaping may ‘renormalise’ ‘smoking-like’ behaviours. This may actually encourage more people to smoke or those who have quit to potentially relapse [5]. Despite vaping being recognised as a less harmful method of using nicotine than tobacco smoking, addiction to nicotine is maintained, and this can be a cause for concern [6]. E-cigarettes are a consumer product, which possibly has created some unrest amongst the medical community, who may perceive medicalised forms of nicotine (NRT) as superior or safer harm reduction approaches to the continued use of nicotine [7]. The concept of addiction itself is morally laden, with many health professionals, and indeed consumers, having a view that the avoidance of any addiction at all is preferable [7]. Thus, the longer-term use of e-cigarettes in relation to tobacco smoking status is a controversial area, due to the inherent duality of e-cigarettes as both offering potential for long-term smoking abstinence yet supporting a continued addiction to nicotine [8].

Prior to the widespread use of e-cigarettes, longitudinal studies exploring smoking cessation attempts in relation to long-term outcomes suggested that although many smokers managed to initially quit, over time, relapse to tobacco smoking was common [9]. Research suggests a range of psychosocial factors at play in contributing to relapse, including physical addiction (craving), behavioural cues to smoke (e.g. for the ‘habit’), social and environmental cues to smoke (being with other smokers, associating smoking as social relaxation) [10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17] and concepts that cut across psychological and social domains, such as relapse as signifying a regaining of the lost identity that was available as a smoker [18, 19]. Initial lapse to tobacco smoking has in the past been shown to be highly predictive of full relapse [20]. However, emergent qualitative evidence suggests that this association may potentially be less strong in the context of e-cigarette use [21]. We have little understanding of how vapers use e-cigarettes beyond cessation to specifically avoid long-term smoking relapse. There is also concern that vapers may continue to ‘dual use’ e-cigarettes alongside continued tobacco smoking. This study sought to purposefully recruit for in-depth interviews people in the general population (not accessing specialist smoking cessation services) who attempted to quit smoking using an e-cigarette, specifically exploring how reported patterns and trajectories of use over time may or may not support long-term smoking abstinence.

Methods

We sought to answer the research questions: ‘what is the experience of e-cigarette use over time?’ and ‘what are vapers’ reported experiences of either tobacco smoking abstinence or relapse?’ A qualitative approach was particularly suitable in this context, where existing theory is outdated in the context of a fast-moving consumer market establishing e-cigarettes as integral to the majority of smoking quit attempts.

For recruitment, we defined smoking relapse as ‘a successful smoking quit attempt of at least 48 h, followed by a relapse (more than five instances of reported lapse) to tobacco smoking’. This was an inclusive definition in order to capture both early and late relapsers, whilst excluding dual users and triallers (those who use e-cigarettes alongside tobacco smoking without making a serious quit attempt). This gives us a practical and clear definition by which to differentiate those e-cigarette users who we can define as ‘relapsed to smoking’ as compared to those ‘abstinent from smoking’.

The study comprised qualitative interviews using purposive sampling. Participants were initially recruited using established personal networks of the research team, via self-referral through advertising in local, national and social media, and snowballing to seek referrals from interviewees. From eligible referrals, a purposive sample of 40 UK vapers was matched by gender and age to a sampling frame of demographic characteristics from a representative sample of UK quitters (Table 1). This sample size was adequate to reach saturation of experiences and key themes [22]. Cross-sectional semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted between September 2016 and May 2017.

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Participants gave written consent for interviews (face-to-face or telephone). Semi-structured guides took a narrative approach to explore participant histories of tobacco smoking and prior quit attempts, through to e-cigarette initiation and whether this was part of an intended quit attempt. Patterns of e-cigarette use were explored. We asked participants to describe the devices they used and the nicotine e-liquid (flavour and strength) they had started with and then to describe in detail any changes in patterns of use or vaping setups over time. Simultaneously, we asked participants to describe the situations and experience of any lapse or relapse to tobacco smoking where this had occurred. We asked participants to reflect on their future intentions and identity-related aspects of vaping. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and anonymised. Participant codes used to reference quotes refer to participant’s gender and age (e.g. ‘F24’ for ‘female aged 24’). Transcripts were thematically analysed [23] systematically case-by-case independently by both CN and EW, with a 10% independent coding check undertaken, whereby both analysts coded the same transcripts and compared coding. The analysis was discussed at regular team meetings, and anomalies were agreed by consensus. Individual case summaries were written to facilitate cross-case comparison, and pathways diagrams were plotted to illustrate participant journeys through smoking cessation.

Results

Participants’ mean age was 41 (SD 14.0, range 21–70) (Table 2), and gender was split equally. All participants identified as White British or European, 16 were employed in managerial, professional or technical occupations. 33 were recruited in East Anglia with the remainder located across other parts of England. Vaping experience varied from starting two weeks before the interview to seven years. 31 participants were vaping and abstinent from tobacco (19 had reported lapses), six participants had relapsed (five dual using both tobacco and vaping) and three were no longer using either e-cigarettes or tobacco.

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Pathways through smoking cessation and initiating vaping

Figure 1 provides a summary of the total sample encapsulating reported pathways through initiating e-cigarette use and quitting tobacco smoking.

Pathways through smoking cessation and e-cigarette use

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Most of our sample reported long histories of tobacco smoking and multiple previous quit attempts However, a minority (seven people) had never seriously attempted to quit smoking. These people stated that they enjoyed smoking and had no particular desire to quit:

I’d never wanted to enough, you know, obviously I’m very aware of the health effects and what not, but I always just enjoyed it too much, and that always took precedent over the health side of things, yes, so I’d never tried, cos I didn’t want to enough, and I knew that you really have to want to do it (F24)

Accidental quitters

Those in our sample who stated that they had not intended to quit smoking had tried vaping on a whim or because they been offered by friends. In these cases, individuals found that they liked it or saw that it offered potential as a substitute for smoking:

one evening I went to the local shop, which is very close to here, to get some cigarettes, and they had run out of the brand that I smoked, and I don’t know why, but instead of choosing another brand which I could of done, and occasionally had done in the past, I said ‘oh well, I’ll try one of those e things, I’ll just try one’ and so I bought it, it was a disposable thing and looking back on it, it didn’t taste very nice, it had a sort of metallic taste to it, and I know that it wasn’t a brand that I would now seek out, but I did, that’s what I did, I just bought it and brought it home, and I said to my wife that evening, ‘you know, this is all right, it’s sufficiently satisfying’ (ok) that I think I might investigate this (ok) and I have never smoked tobacco since that day (really), not one drag, and I have never felt that I wanted to (M63)

The narrative here demonstrates vaping is experienced as a ‘revelation’ in terms of quickly and easily substituting previous smoking behaviour. In this narrative, the smoking quit attempt is ‘accidental’:

it felt like I was smoking, so I didn’t have to kind of think up displacement activities, I didn’t have to find something else to do with myself, I could do exactly what I’d always done, just with a slightly different device, and yes, I really, really took to it, and within five days I’d chucked out the last of my cigarettes…but you know within 5 days I’d stopped completely without meaning to (F38)

Many people discussed how they felt that e-cigarette use was a ‘no pressure’ approach to quitting:

it was a natural progression because I enjoyed it, it was easy to do, I didn’t even think about, like I said, if I put myself under pressure I probably fail at it, and think ‘oh, I have to do this’, but as I didn’t, I just, it just organically happened really for me (F34)

The success of vaping as an aid to quitting smoking can therefore be understood both in terms of the satisfying physical substitution of nicotine delivery, but also the psychological and social relief of not declaring oneself as ‘quitting smoking’, thus not setting oneself up to potentially fail. This is in contrast to the ‘success/failure’ narrative experienced in the past when attempting to quit smoking by other means:

absolutely lousy, feel like a complete failure (right)… you know you’ve put in an awful lot of effort, you’ve gone through all of the struggle of getting off of an addiction, and to fall so easily into an addiction that is very, very easy to fall back into (yes, yes)…you know it’s an awful feeling (M44)

Purposeful quitters

Most of our sample had initiated e-cigarette use because they actively wanted to quit smoking:

gum wasn’t going to cut it basically and the patches just didn’t seem like a good idea to me I didn’t think I wasn’t to make a real attempt and patches and gum weren’t going to work so actually try something that may possibly work (M30).

For these people, e-cigarette use was experienced as substantially different from other smoking cessation support. There were important strategies employed that may have impacted on the outcome. Some people tried to equate a number of cigarettes smoked to liquid strength, usually with the guidance of a shop [24] or peers who were experienced vapers:

The guy in the shop spoke to me about, like, how many I smoked a day, how often I smoked, what I was smoking, that kind of stuff and cos you can go up to 24 mg, but he said no because I was only on ten [cigarettes a day] (right) so 18 was probably the best one to start on (M36)

Switching

Many of our sample switched quickly and completely from smoking to vaping:

having tried so often and failed so often and not having got on with anything else, I was expecting it to be really really hard (ok) but I think the combination of finding something that reproduced the experience but without so many of the carcinogens was the thing that worked for me. So I found it remarkably easy, it sounds silly to say, but having tried and failed so often, having been a smoker for such a long time I didn’t find it hard. (M53)

Participants described how easy it was to quit using this method and how they enjoyed vaping in its own right. This suggests that vaping offers something additional to nicotine replacement—it is a pleasurable alternative.

I think the ways of giving up that as far as I know are on offer at the moment with, you know, gum and patches and stuff like that, that helps with the physical cravings, but it doesn’t help with the habits, and it doesn’t help with the feeling of breathing something in and breathing smoke out, which, you know, which is such a fundamental part of smoking that, you know, I think I wouldn’t have given up if those had been the only alternatives offered (F38)

For others, vaping was viewed as a continuum with smoking, as opposed to a method of smoking cessation. For these people, using an e-cigarette was not seen as giving up smoking, just smoking in a different way. There was a level of comfortableness with addiction to nicotine, seeing it as acceptable as a harm-reducing way of using nicotine:

To actually have [nicotine] in the form of an e-cigarette can be more effective than nicotine chewing gum or nicotine patches cos they’re basically a method of stopping smoking and stopping the addiction to nicotine aren’t they? Whereas e-cigarettes, you’ve still got the addiction to nicotine but the method that you’re ingesting it is can be as, you know, not far off as satisfying as having a cigarette (M49)

Sliding

Employing the ‘no pressure’ strategy, some people found themselves naturally ‘sliding’ towards smoking cessation—initially ‘dual using’ both tobacco and e-cigarettes, but over time coming to use e-cigarettes more and eventually completely vaping and being tobacco-free:

I didn’t stop like one day… as one went down and the other went up (ok) so it sort of replaced one with the other rather than cold turkey…I think once I started to do this because it was around, and actually like, if you’re at home I could smoke it (the e cigarette) whereas the other one (tobacco) I’d have, I didn’t really smoke at home, I would have had to go outside or whatever (yes) it was easier to smoke it (the e cigarette), so that made it better (yes) and then at some point I thought ‘I’m not buying another packet’ (of tobacco cigarettes), so then you sort of force the issue and you’re not smoking much at all (F36b)

Sliding appears to be a novel experience in terms of smoking cessation, suggesting an important route into fully quitting tobacco smoking for some people, particularly those who dual use or do not actively want to quit smoking.

Relapse after initiating

Despite initial success, that for some people was easily maintained, a majority of people either fully relapsed [16] or dual used [8] after purchasing their first device. For some, this was because they were not actually initially attempting to give up smoking. For others, brief lapse to tobacco smoking occurred due to social or emotional reasons. However, importantly, lapse for these people did not appear to be as catastrophic as it may have been in the past, as it did not necessarily lead to full relapse [21].

However, for many, relapse/dual use occurred after initiation due to inferiorities in the first device purchased. Although a few people in the sample did manage to maintain full smoking abstinence using a device that they did not find fully satisfying, most people did not manage to maintain abstinence initially. The reasons people gave for their first device being inferior were mostly related to first generation or ‘cig-a-like’ type devices, which were generally experienced as unsatisfying:

I think they had them in the shop down the road, just like the ones that looked like a cigarette, so I tried that to start with, but they’re not very good, I don’t think, and if you’re seriously thinking of you’re, like swapping that for cigarettes, for those sort of ones I think you try them, and think, ‘actually they’re nothing like it’ and (yes) and I think that puts a lot of people off (F46)

Others reported that the first devices they tried were inadequate or continually malfunctioned:

I did try e-cigarettes before in the past, about early 2010 let’s say, but I didn’t really like them. They just didn’t work too well, they were spitting liquid nicotine in your mouth and awful stuff like that, so that was definitely a no go for me. (M22)

Avoiding relapse to tobacco smoking

Finding an effective and satisfying vaping setup

Through trialling different setups, most people in our sample had eventually achieved abstinence by getting the right vaping setup and learning to vape in patterns that met their needs. For some, this was a personal quest and a process of trial and error, whereas others sought support from other vapers, forums or vape shops.

just picking up an e-cigarette from a newsagent and taking a puff and thinking no, that’s no good, isn’t the end of the story, because there are different brands, different tastes, different strengths and flavours, you can get it right, and it can be a substitute (M63)

Participants had strategies that they had learnt over time to ensure their e-cigarette setup was reliable:

The batteries, I weren’t too sure how long they would last and when I first started I thought “oh my god what about if that run out?” and so I bought another one exactly the same (ok) so I have one battery on and one already charged up. (F60)

Developing patterns of use that are helpful in maintaining abstinence from smoking

Participants described varying individualised patterns of use of their e-cigarette. The key point is that, over time, individuals came to vape in patterns that they found acceptable, enjoyable and that were sufficiently satisfying so that they did not experience strong cravings for tobacco. For some, patterns of vaping directly replicated previous patterns of smoking:

it was beside my car from when I got in from work, sit down, cup of tea and the e-cigarette, so exactly when I would have previously have had a couple of cigarettes, and then again during the evening after a meal, coffee and the e-cigarette, so exactly when I would have had two or three more, watching television during the evening, and so on (F62)

However, for many, patterns of vaping were very different from previous patterns of smoking. Particularly, people vaped in places they would not previously have smoked (in the house, in bed, in the car, ‘in secret’ at work). The majority ‘grazed’ on their device throughout the day and could not really say how often they used their e-cigarette or how many puffs they took. This was contrasted to smoking:

I feel like I’m grazing on it constantly (yes), whereas with a cigarette it’s, you know, when it’s done you’ve had enough because it’s finished, whereas with [e-cig] I never really know when I’ve had enough I suppose. (F36)

For some, the ‘grazing’ pattern of vaping meant that they tended to vape little and often, which may well have impacted on nicotine levels in the body, such that people used the e-cigarette to avoid craving through nicotine withdrawal:

I use it all day long, whenever, I suppose nicotine withdrawal is kicking in, but I’m not doing it for the numerous minutes that smoking a cigarette can take, so it’s often two or three inhales, back in the pocket of the handbag, forget it for a little while (F62)

Participants’ beliefs towards grazing behaviour were generally positive:

That was the annoying thing about cigarettes, they stop and you’ve got to then say right I’m not going to light another one I’m going to leave it for a certain amount of time, so you immediately start withdrawing as soon as you’ve stubbed one out. You’re kind of like ‘I want another one now, but I’m not going to’ and then ‘oh I’ll give in, I’ll have another one’, but with this I have one little puff every now and then. (F52)

However, some were perturbed by the grazing pattern of use and worried that this meant they may be increasing their addiction to nicotine:

It’s so easy and less invasive I probably, yes I don’t know, if I vape more than I would smoke (M40)

Potential factors in supporting smoking abstinence

Replication of smoking

For those at the time of interview reporting vaping and abstinence from smoking, vaping was discussed as similar to smoking in meeting nicotine addiction needs, thus assisting the individual to avoid tobacco smoking relapse:

the vaporiser is a very similar form of receiving the nicotine whereas if you just stick a mint (NRT) in your mouth that’s completely different to smoking (M37)

Ex-smokers also used their e-cigarette to meet psychological needs, e.g. e-cigarettes were used as part of the pattern and routine of everyday life, as a direct substitution for when cigarettes might previously have been used:

even the addiction, like the nicotine necessarily, I don’t think it’s the habit of it, and the like, it’s very embedded in my psyche, like, I enjoy going and standing outside in the evening and having a cigarette, it’s not even, I mean the cigarette is a big part of it, but it’s the habit and the like, the ritual of it as well (F24)

E-cigarettes were enjoyed due to the habitual aspects of vaping that mirrored previous smoking behaviour. The ‘hand-to-mouth’ action, holding something in the hand, breathing vapour into the lungs and blowing our vapour were all mentioned as important behavioural aspects that potentially contributed to the prevention of tobacco smoking relapse:

part of my problem has always been it’s a habit and it’s having it in your hand and sticking it in your mouth so it’s a replacement it’s a direct replacement for doing, putting something in your hand, and it generates smoke and I know that sounds daft but the e-lite thing didn’t make that much smoke, and it’s weird when you’re smoking a cigarette for it not to make smoke, so it sort of ticked all those boxes and it actually tasted nicer than a cigarette (F36)

Socially, vaping was experienced by many as an alternative to smoking. Unlike with previous smoking quit attempts, vapers felt that they did not have to distance themselves from their existing social networks in order to avoid smoking relapse:

some people get into that routine I suppose, where they still quite like to have that time away from their desk and walk outside, cos that’s what they were used to when they were smokers, so they’ll go and stand outside in the smoking section, but they’ll vape (M37)

Vaping facilitated a sense of belonging to a specific social group for some:

[There’s] a big community […] I see fellow vapers in town we just we just sort of give each other a look, we look at each others mods, it’s sort of like the classic “oh you’re a vaper, hi” the whole community is all one. [F21]

Identity

The social acceptance of vaping suggests that vaping met the identity needs of some of our sample. For those who had previously strongly associated with a smoker identity, vaping offered an alternative attractive identity:

I can well see that, well I know people that are quite content to be vapers for the rest of their life, you know, they haven’t even got any interest in coming off the nicotine and they’re at a level that they’re comfortable with, and they do view themselves as vapers, and they’re going to remain vapers, because that’s what they’re happy with, you know, so from that element, you know, there’s an awful lot of diversity out there, there’s a lot to keep them interested, and I don’t view that as a negative thing, you know, it’s a good thing (M44)

Here, it is clear that there are numerous potential vaping identities available within the category of ‘vaper’. For some, associating with one of these vaping identities clearly supported continued vaping and may have played a role in tobacco relapse prevention. However, for others, the ‘vaper’ identity was minimised in favour of an ‘ex-smoker’ identity, positioning oneself differently from those who identified with the social and cultural aspects of vaping:

[I see myself as] an ex smoker. I would say an ex smoker I think, but there’s still the nicotine addiction there. I don’t know if I would really call myself a vaper. I vape but, you know, it’s still something that I, yes I don’t sometimes. I’ll always be a smoker, it’s something that’s never going to sort of go away, but now I can start saying I’m actually or become an ex-smoker (F46)

Pleasure

As well as substituting physical, psychological, social and cultural elements of previous tobacco smoking behaviour, vaping was frequently discussed as enjoyable and pleasurable in its own right—sometime above and beyond how tobacco smoking was perceived:

it often smells quite pleasant and the vapour dissipates quite quickly, it doesn’t stick to clothing, so you know I think people have got a better perception of it rather than tobacco smoke (M37)

Flavours and smells, the sensory aspect of vaping, were an important and pleasurable aspect:

it’s probably one of the most important things in a way, in a sense, that if it was flavourless I don’t think it would really have, it’s actively pleasurable, it’s a nice thing. It’s that bit that means it’s fundamentally different in my mind between a patch or chewing gum or the spray. (M39)

Practicalities

Practical aspects, such as reduced cost compared to smoking, accessibility and ease of use, were important in discussing continued e-cigarette use:

if you’re spending a lot of money on cigarettes it, you know, it’s a massive saving when you switch to vaping (F40)

Accessibility was multi-faceted. E-cigarettes were enjoyed because of their accessibility for everyday use and convenience:

It’s a small little tight unit that fits in my pocket. Yes just it just does everything and its tiny, I think that’s the thing that works for me, it’s small, compact and it’s not much hassle. (M26)

Partly, the convenience aspect was enjoyed as vaping could be easily and discreetly incorporated into everyday situations:

I didn’t have to go outside and stand out there in the cold for five or ten minutes while I smoked the cigarette. I could just sort of, when the wife’s not looking (yes) have a quick puff (M70)

Perceived health benefits

Participants discussed multiple perceived health benefits that corresponded to the health benefits of quitting smoking, as they remained abstinent from smoking by vaping:

I could tell that my sort of breathing was a lot better, my skin was good, my teeth were good, hair and nails were growing well, and generally just felt a lot better in myself (F27)

As well as improved respiratory function, which was frequently discussed, marked improvements in sensations of taste and small were noted:

In the first sort of six weeks I noticed the usual sort of, blimey what’s that nasty smell, I never used to smell that before, but yes the usual taste and smell thing. (M58)

Future intentions

Some ‘invested vapers’ saw themselves as invested in vaping as a hobby or were interested in the technical aspects of it. They viewed it as a fairly significant part of their life. It had become more than a smoking cessation aid and was an enjoyable pastime in its own right. Therefore, they had no intention to quit:

I have no wish to wean myself off… I don’t look at it now as a keeping me off the cigarettes, cos I don’t want a cigarette at all, so it’s not really keeping me off the cigarettes, it’s a hobby now, and a social thing, and thats, I will carry on vaping because, you know, it’s a hobby and a social thing (M67)

Others were really enthusiastic about how vaping had enabled them to easily stop smoking. These ‘enthusiastic switchers’ felt vaping had been successful mainly for its ability to replicate smoking in terms of satisfying cravings and the enjoyment they got from smoking:

I’m addicted to nicotine, so yes, yes, I’m a vaper but I’m not one of these big beardy weirdy hipsters who just spends all day long, you know, going harping on about this new thing and that new thing, and this massive cloud, and so I’m not like that, I’m an ex-smoker who is addicted to nicotine, so I won’t be giving it up because it’s got nicotine (M41)

This group was happy to continue to vape. They were concerned that if they reduced their vaping, they would be vulnerable to tobacco smoking relapse. Therefore, although they were not fully invested in a vaping identity as with the above group, they discussed no intention to quit vaping.

Many invested vapers and enthusiastic switchers were completely comfortable having a dependence on nicotine:

I’m kind of a little resigned to having a nicotine addiction. That seemed a particularly good way of satisfying it without going back to sort of smoking excessively. (M49)

However, a very different group, ‘nicotine quitters’ were people who had quit e-cigarettes or were intending to. They mainly viewed e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation aid to help them eventually quit nicotine altogether:

I think some people see it as more like a hobby, it’s like, now I’m not smoking I’m going to vape, but I see it more like cutting down, using it to quit, and then I want to get rid it, and then only use it if I need it for social occasions (F22)

In contrast to the other groups, many of those who wanted to quit e-cigarettes wanted to because they were uncomfortable having a dependency:

I don’t like the idea of being addicted to anything. It’s not, I don’t think nicotine is 100% safe, I know it’s a lot better vaping than you know smoking cigarettes, so you know I’m quite pleased we’ve done that bit, but I just feel so silly having this prop. (F59)

Discussion

Our findings demonstrate that e-cigarettes may be a unique harm reduction intervention for smoking relapse prevention. Particularly, vaping was shown in our data to be an attractive option offering a route into smoking cessation for those people who did not initially want to stop smoking, or have found it difficult to stop smoking using other means of cessation support. Many of these people would not consider seeking formal support from a healthcare professional to quit smoking, but might try vaping on a whim or because they are offered, and subsequently go on to ‘accidentally quit’. This point is critical not just for initial smoking cessation but for supporting long-term abstinence from tobacco smoking. Vaping was perceived qualitatively differently to other forms of smoking cessation support, offering a pleasurable and enjoyable alternative to smoking. Vaping was discussed as meeting the needs of our sample of ex-smokers by substituting physical, psychological, social, cultural and identity-related aspects of tobacco addiction. Indeed, for many, the potential of vaping as ‘better than smoking’ suggests that sliding or switching to vaping is a viable long-term substitute for smoking.

In line with the principles of a harm reduction approach to ‘treatment’ of addictive behaviours, our findings suggest that many smokers enjoy and do not wish to quit smoking unless there is an equally enjoyable alternative. In this respect, vaping is attractive. In first trying vaping, those who initiated use experimentally or on a whim often reported periods of dual use, corresponding to other qualitative evidence [25]. Our data on patterns of vaping over time suggest that ‘sliding’ towards cessation without purposefully meaning to quit smoking was an important pattern. Thus, positioning dual use as problematic may be premature; instead, we might helpfully see dual use on a trajectory to smoking cessation and support accordingly [26].

A discourse of the importance of pleasure in tobacco harm reduction is emerging [27]. This was a strong theme in our data. Pleasure as an emotion, desire or simply a state of being intersects with the concept of identity, since humans naturally engage in pleasurable or rewarding behaviours that bolster self-esteem and confirm a positive sense of social identity [28]. It has been demonstrated that identity change is a prerequisite to successful long-term smoking abstinence [29,30,31], and where the ex-smoker identity is disrupted, consequentially, relapse may occur [18]. Importantly, our findings demonstrate that vaping offers the availability of a range of alternative identities [32] that are culturally and socially acceptable to ex-smokers.

Our data detailing varied but patterned pathways through initiating vaping clearly suggest that smoking cessation by vaping is a process that unfolds over time. Individuals described how they frequently experimented with first generation ‘cig-a-like’ devices, which were generally found to be ineffective, before finding a vaping setup that suited their individualised needs and preferences. For practically supporting ex-smokers to quit smoking and to prevent relapse, this suggests that vapers need ongoing support and advice, firstly to find a suitable vaping setup and, secondly, to learn to use the device in patterns that are acceptable and that substitute the habit of smoking sufficiently, from a physical, psychological and social perspective. Finally, vapers need ongoing support to troubleshoot problems, such as difficulties with device function, in order to prevent potential tobacco smoking relapse, as continuing to vape is associated with continued abstinence from smoking [33].

Theoretically, our findings shift the paradigm of thinking related to smoking relapse prevention, through illuminating the unique ability of e-cigarettes to substitute psychosocial, psychological and social aspects that were previously enjoyed about smoking. Development of theory in this way is likely to contribute to interventions incorporating individual choice, agency, situated social and cultural influences and peer support as important dimensions, in order to reduce the harm associated with tobacco smoking. This is in contrast, but may be incorporated into, previous models of smoking relapse prevention, which were primarily psychological, focused on motivation and cue-driven behaviour [34].

A limitation of our work is that the data and thus conclusions are drawn from a cross-sectional qualitative sample. Our methods sought to answer open exploratory questions about the experience of e-cigarette use and patterns of use that may or may not support smoking relapse prevention. Although purposive, we matched our sample using a sampling frame to a nationally representative sample of UK quitters [35]. Despite our best efforts, the sample under-represents older populations of ex-smokers, those from lower socio-economic groups and ethnic minorities. Fully relapsed smokers we found ‘hard to reach’, perhaps due to shame and stigma associated with relapsed tobacco use. However, we are able to draw conclusions about relapse prevention in the context of vaping, since many of our sample reported experiencing relapse after initiating e-cigarette use, but had subsequently gone on to achieve abstinence through experimentation with different devices and vaping setups. Thus, although our findings are not statistically generalisable, we are reassured that they have transferability and could be reliably confirmed.

There was a divide in our sample between those who intended to continue to use e-cigarettes and those who eventually wanted to stop using nicotine altogether, as supported by other qualitative work [32]. This demonstrates some level of engagement with wider public health debates about the potential long-term utility of vaping as a harm reduction approach for smoking relapse prevention versus concerns about long-term use—the duality of e-cigarettes delivering nicotine as both a ‘poison’ and a ‘remedy’ [8]. Future research might usefully explore these stated intentions against long-term outcomes. A larger quantitative sample could explore associations over time between devices, patterns of use and abstinence outcomes, as we hypothesise based on our qualitative data that devices, e-liquids, patterns of use and stated intentions may all potentially impact on long-term tobacco abstinence. Eventually, we propose that future research might formally test an e-cigarette-based relapse prevention intervention, which critically must incorporate consumer choice and peer support beyond the intervention of the e-cigarette.

Conclusions

This paper presents novel qualitative data on patterns of vaping over time and suggests potential factors, drawing on participant perspectives, in supporting long-term tobacco smoking abstinence. Findings show that, for this sample, e-cigarettes are a unique innovation supporting smoking relapse prevention. E-cigarettes are particularly attractive to ex-smokers, as having the right vaping setup is intrinsically satisfying and pleasurable. For many, vaping comes to be preferred over time to tobacco smoking, particularly as the user becomes more experienced and experiments until they are able to find an individualised setup that meets their needs. For some, e-cigarettes can substitute the physical, psychological, social, cultural and identity-related dimensions that were previously enjoyed about tobacco smoking, and thus may uniquely support long-term smoking relapse prevention. Many vapers were happy with their identity as a vaper and comfortable with nicotine addiction, but others saw e-cigarettes as a short-term smoking cessation intervention and eventually aimed to quit vaping as well as tobacco smoking. Vaping attracted some ex-smokers who had never intended to quit smoking and offered a viable and long-term alternative to tobacco smoking that was experienced as supporting relapse prevention.

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Acknowledgements

We wish to thank all vapers who took part in qualitative interviews and shared their experiences so openly and candidly. We also wish to thank the experts by experience who commented on the research documentation, particularly Sarah Jakes, New Nicotine Alliance, who has provided guidance throughout the project and has assisted with the preparation of this article. We thank Dr. Divya Nelson and Dr. Isobel Greaves, who assisted with the data collection whilst on student placements. Finally, we thank Dr. Jamie Brown for providing us with figures for matching our sampling frame to the Smoking Toolkit Study.

Funding

This work was supported by a project grant from Cancer Research UK (C54889/A22732). The lead author was a Research Fellow of the Society for the Study of Addiction at the time of undertaking the study.

Availability of data and materials

Anonymised qualitative data will be archived in the UK data archive following completion of the study (08/2018).

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Norwich Medical School, Norwich Research Park, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK

    Caitlin Notley & Emma Ward

  2. Centre for Addictive Behaviours Research, School of Applied Sciences, London South Bank University, 103 Borough Road, London, SE1 0AA, UK

    Lynne Dawkins

  3. Leicester Medical School, Leicester, UK

    Richard Holland

Contributions

CN is the PI for the study. She led the study design, funding application, undertook data collection and analysis and is the lead author for this article. EW is the lead researcher for the study. She undertook the data collection, led the thematic analysis and contributed to the writing of the article. LD, RH and SJ were all involved in conceptualising the study design and the funding application, have assisted in the interpretation of the analysis and contributed substantially to the drafting of the article for publication. SJ is an independent ‘expert by experience’ offering experiential input and comment throughout the research process. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Caitlin Notley.

Ethics declarations

Ethics approval and consent to participate

Ethical approval for the study was granted from UEA’s Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences Research Ethics Committee, September 2016 (Ref 114). All participants gave written informed consent to be interviewed.

Consent for publication

Consent to publish anonymised quotations in reporting for publication was given by all research participants.

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Publisher’s Note

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

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Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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Источник: https://harmreductionjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12954-018-0237-7

Vaping statistics 2021

What is vaping? Health effects Why people vape

1

Smoking, a well-known link to cardiovascular disease and death, appears to be on the decline. While the use of e-cigarettes, known as vaping, is increasingly popular, there has been limited research on the impact of vaping on the body.

In a large data analysis of more than 7,100 U.S. adults ages 18 and older, researchers studied the association of cigarette smoking and e-cigarette use with inflammation and oxidative stress as biomarkers. Inflammation and oxidative stress are key contributors to smoking-induced cardiovascular disease and their biomarkers have been shown to be predictors of cardiovascular events, including heart attack and heart failure.

"This study is among the first to use nationally representative data to examine the association of cigarette and e-cigarette use behaviors with biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress," said Andrew C. Stokes, Ph.D., assistant professor of global health at Boston University School of Public Health in Boston and first author of the study. "Given the lag time between tobacco exposure and disease symptoms and diagnosis, identifying the association between e-cigarette use and sensitive biomarkers of subclinical cardiovascular injury is necessary for understanding the long-term effects of newer tobacco products such as e-cigarettes."

Researchers used data from the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study, a nationally representative longitudinal cohort in the U.S. This study's analysis was restricted to adults 18 years and older from Wave 1 of the survey, which was administered from 2013 to 2014 and included the collection of blood and urine samples.

Five biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress were analyzed. Participants were slotted into four categories based on the use of traditional cigarettes and e-cigarettes within a 30-day period: nonuse of cigarettes and e-cigarettes; exclusive vaping; exclusive cigarette smoking; and dual use of cigarettes and e-cigarettes. To test the robustness of initial results, the scientists repeated the analyses in subgroups of respondents, including those with no past 30-day use of any other tobacco products.

Of the study participants, more than half (58.6%) did not use cigarettes or e-cigarettes; nearly 2% vaped exclusively; about 30% smoked cigarettes exclusively; and about 10% used e-cigarettes and traditional cigarettes.

The analysis found:

  • Participants who vaped exclusively showed a similar inflammatory and oxidative stress profile as people who did not smoke cigarettes or use e-cigarettes.
  • Participants who smoked exclusively and those who used cigarettes and e-cigarettes had higher levels across all biomarkers assessed compared to participants who did not use cigarettes or e-cigarettes.
  • Compared to participants who smoked exclusively, those who vaped exclusively had significantly lower levels of almost all inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers. However, participants who used cigarettes and e-cigarettes had levels of all inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers comparable chase bank application for credit card those who smoked exclusively.

"This study adds to the limited body of research we have on biologic measures in those using e-cigarettes," said study co-author Rose Marie Robertson, M.D., FAHA, deputy chief science and medical officer of the American Heart Association and co-director of the Association's National Institutes is vaping bad for you yes or no Health/Food and Drug Administration-funded Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science, which supported the study. "I believe it has an important message for individuals who may believe using e-cigarettes while continuing to smoke some combustible cigarettes reduces their risk. This commonly-seen pattern of dual use was not associated with lower levels of inflammatory markers, and thus is not likely to offer a reduction in risk in this specific area."

Researchers also conducted extensive analyses to test the results against the influence of related behaviors such as the use of other tobacco products and marijuana, and secondhand smoke exposure. The results remained consistent across the additional analyses.

The large population sample of this study makes the findings applicable to the U.S. adult population. One of the study's limitations is its cross-sectional approach of looking at population data at one point in time, which makes it impossible to establish causality.

Researchers said the study highlights the importance of continued public education regarding the risks of cigarette smoking and the failure of dual use to reduce risk.

"The is vaping bad for you yes or no could be used to counsel patients about the potential risk of using both cigarettes and e-cigarettes," Stokes said. "Some people who smoke cigarettes, pick up e-cigarette use to reduce the frequency with which they smoke cigarettes. They often become dual users of both products rather than is vaping bad for you yes or no entirely from one to the other. If e-cigarettes are used as a means to quit smoking, cigarette smoking should be completely replaced and a plan to ultimately attain freedom from all tobacco products should be advised."

Co-authors are Wubin Xie, Dr.P.H., M.P.H.; Anna Wilson, M.P.H.; Hanqi Yang, B.A.; Olusola Orimoloye, Ph.D.; Alyssa Harlow, M.P.H.; Jessica Fetterman, Ph.D.; Andrew DeFilippis, Ph.D.; Emelia Benjamin, M.D., Sc.M.; Aruni Bhatnagar, Ph.D.; Naomi Hamburg, M.D., M.Sc.; and Michael Blaha, M.D., M.P.H. The authors' disclosures are in the manuscript.

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health funded the study through grants to the American Heart Association's Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science which works closely with investigators at institutions across the country to pursue research that adds to the existing knowledge about the health impacts of smoking and nicotine-related products, findings that can help inform regulation of tobacco products.

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Materials provided by American Heart Association. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Andrew C. Stokes, Wubin Xie, Anna E. Wilson, Hanqi Yang, Olusola A. Orimoloye, Alyssa F. Harlow, Jessica L. Fetterman, Andrew P. DeFilippis, Emelia J. Benjamin, Rose Marie Robertson, Aruni Bhatnagar, Naomi M. Hamburg, Michael J. Blaha. Association of Cigarette and Electronic Cigarette Use Patterns With Levels of Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Biomarkers Among US Adults: Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study. Circulation, 2021; DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.120.051551

Cite This Page:

American Heart Association. "Vaping combined with smoking is likely as harmful as smoking cigarettes alone, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 January 2021. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/01/210104075839.htm>.

American Heart Association. (2021, January 4). Vaping combined with smoking is likely as harmful as smoking cigarettes alone, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 5, 2021 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/01/210104075839.htm

American Heart Association. "Vaping combined with smoking is likely as harmful as smoking cigarettes alone, study is vaping bad for you yes or no ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/01/210104075839.htm (accessed December 5, 2021).


Источник: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/01/210104075839.htm
Cessation

The Real Dangers of Vaping Are Only Now Beginning to Be Understood

Let’s start with some good news: Fewer teenagers are smoking than ever before. According to a January 2019 report from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the number of teens who smoke cigarettes daily has dropped 88 percent since the mid-1990s. But, as we all know from the cloudy corners on the outskirts of high schools, more teens are flirting with the dangers of vaping instead. Today, a whopping 21 percent of high schoolers use e-cigarettes, up from just 1.5 percent in 2011, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For middle-school kids, vaping rates rose from 0.6 percent in 2011 to 4.9 percent last year, a 49 percent increase over 2017.

At least they’ve done away with those foul-smelling cancer sticks, right? At first, experts thought so. In fact, vaping was promoted for years as a less-harmful step towards quitting smoking. The usually sweet-smelling vapors were thought to be a lot better than tobacco and chemicals set on fire.

We were wrong.

“Our understanding of e-cigarettes is still accumulating, but at this point, we are pretty confident that e-cigarettes are at least two-thirds to three-fourths as bad as cigarettes,” says Stanton Glantz, Ph.D., professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco’s Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education. “And remember, cigarettes are pretty horrible. Vaping is like, instead of jumping out of the 40th story of a building, you’re jumping out of the 30th story.”

Other experts think Glantz is being conservative. Thanks to new chemical cocktails, the increased nicotine delivery, and the power of that drug on the brain (all the worse in concentrated form), Juuls and other e-cigarettes may in fact be worse than your average cancer stick.

Here’s a look at what the experts now know — and why those headlines of hospitalized teens from nicotine toxicity and vaping-related lung troubles may be just the beginning.

The Clear and Present Dangers of Vaping

This summer saw the various nefarious effects of vaping play out in the news over and over. In July alone, eight teenagers in Wisconsin were hospitalized for serious lung damage caused by vaping, some of whom had to be put on ventilators in the intensive care unit. During the first week of August, four Minnesota teens were hospitalized for a week or longer because of vaping-related lung troubles, prompting the state’s health department to issue a warning against e-cigarettes.

Also, this summer, an 18-year-old Florida college student’s lung collapsed — something virtually unheard of in someone so young — after he’d been using a Juul vaping device daily for a couple of years. And just this month, the Food and Drug Administration announced it has received 127 reports of seizures and other serious neurological symptoms linked to vaping since 2009.

“With the data we should have about three or four years from now, I think we’ll find that e-cigarettes are equally as bad or worse in terms of overall health risks.”

Seizures? Lungs collapsing? Nicotine toxicity? These are not things one would hear about when cigarette smoking was the norm. Vaporized nicotine is a different danger. When it comes to lung health, look to the great array of chemicals that Juul and e-cigarettes require to make them work properly. In other words, that vapor is in no way just sweet-smelling water — it’s a huge assortment of chemicals going straight to your lungs.

Then, there are the brain issues, the epidemic of “nic sick” teens who experience nausea, headaches, lightheadedness, and even vomiting. This is due to this especially concentrated form of nicotine that you don’t get in regular cigarettes. The FDA is playing catchup now on regulating e-cigarettes in their many forms. Meanwhile, researchers are pointing to increasingly worrisome evidence of the kinds of harms Juul and its brethren can make. It’s a race that, many worry, will end with more teens and adults in what is aba number hospital before all is said and done.

“Nic Sick,” Nicotine Salt, and the Dangers of Vaping

The dangers of combustible cigarettes are well-documented. Cigarettes consist of roughly 7,000 chemicals, according to the National Cancer Institute, 69 of which are proven carcinogens. Along with nicotine, cigarette chemicals include hydrogen cyanide, lead, arsenic, ammonia, benzene, and carbon is vaping bad for you yes or no, and most are found in tar, the nasty residue left behind from burning tobacco.

Is nicotine bad for you? Amazon visa card login canada. Nicotine itself is highly problematic. First and foremost, it’s crazy-addictive is vaping bad for you yes or no it changes the brain. “Nicotine mimics the chemicals that brain cells use to communicate with each other and causes the brain to reconfigure itself,” Glantz says. “The nicotine molecule is shaped a lot like acetylcholine, which the nervous system uses to communicate, so it fakes out and overstimulates the nervous system.”

The brain responds to this, he explains, by growing additional nicotine receptors. And with more receptors, the body craves more nicotine. Without it, withdrawal sets in, causing jitters, anxiety, headaches, and irritability. “This rewiring of the brain is bad for adults, but it’s especially bad for young people because until around age 26, the brain is still developing,” Stantz says. “When you start messing up normal communication between nerves as the system is still being built, the adaptations are a lot more permanent.”

Looking strictly at the nicotine factor, e-cigarettes can be even worse than traditional cigs because they tend to deliver even more of the stimulant. With newer vaping devices, unlike first-generation e-cigarettes, nicotine levels can be controlled, either by adjusting the contraption itself or purchasing e-juices of varying concentrations. Regardless, they still tend to push out more nicotine than old-school smoke.

For this reason, Stantz calls out Juul devices as particularly dangerous. “Free-base nicotine, which you get in a cigarette and an older-generation e-cigarette, is very alkaline and hard to inhale, so it triggers a gag reflex, which limits the amount of nicotine per puff,” he says. “Juul transitioned to nicotine salt and added some acid to the e-liquid to make it less alkaline, as well as adding flavors. When you put all that together, it is much easier to inhale, so Juul devices deliver a much higher dose per puff.”

This may be why kids seem to be getting addicted to Juul much faster than they got hooked on traditional cigarettes and even older e-cigarettes.

The Other Dangers of Vaping: Heavy Metals and Formaldehyde

But there are many more issues with vaping than just the nicotine. While research shows e-cigarettes contain lower levels of carcinogens than regular cigarettes, their vapor, which many users assume is harmless, is downright dangerous. “It consists of ultrafine particles that are about 100 times smaller than a human hair,” says Glantz. “These particles include acrolein and formaldehyde, as well as diacetyl, cinnamaldehyde, and other flavorants that are fine to eat but not to inhale as fine particles.”

These chemicals’ tiny size, he explains, allows them to permeate the body more deeply, making them especially toxic. Earlier this year, Harvard researchers discovered that diacetyl and its chemical cousin 2,3-pentanedione — found in 90 percent of e-cigarettes tested — damage the cilia lining the lungs and airways, increasing the risks of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

“Vaping is like, instead of jumping out of the 40th story of a building, you’re jumping out of the 30th story.”

“E-cigarettes also include heavy metals like lead and silica,” Glantz says. “Their wicks often have silica, and when they wear out, you can get little particles of silica in the lungs, which is very harmful. Additionally, e-cigarettes disable the normal functioning of macrophages, cells within the lungs that gobble up bacteria and other infectious agents we breathe in. When you disable them, you are more prone to infections.”

Also, like smoking cigarettes, vaping threatens cardiovascular health. “Our blood vessels are constantly adjusting in size depending on how much blood flow is needed, a process called flow-mediated dilation,” Glantz says. “This is controlled by nitric oxide synthase, enzymes that e-cigarette aerosol completely disables, severely compromising the arteries’ ability to expand when they need to.” This issue has been linked to long-term heart disease, he adds, and it can cause platelets to clump together, leading to heart attacks.

Overall, the evidence clearly shows vaping is exceptionally risky for and even immediately harmful to teens. As for Glantz’s estimation that e-cigarettes are 66 percent to 75 percent as hazardous as combustible cigarettes? He doesn’t believe that statement is vaping bad for you yes or no hold up much longer: “With the data, we should have about three or four years from now, I think we’ll find that e-cigarettes are equally as bad is vaping bad for you yes or no worse in terms of overall health risks.”

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