is live culture yogurt good for you

Yogurts and frozen yogurts can contain live active cultures. others) for their health effects, but not all yogurts have these extra probiotic bacteria. The live cultures or bacteria in plain live yoghurt have been said for generations to boost beneficial gut microflora, particularly when you. Yogurt is a nutrient-dense probiotic food.
is live culture yogurt good for you
is live culture yogurt good for you

Is live culture yogurt good for you -

Yogurt

Food produced by bacterial fermentation of milk

For other uses, see Yogurt (disambiguation).

Yogurt (; ,[1] from Turkish: yoğurt) also spelled yoghurt, yogourt or yoghourt, is a food produced by bacterialfermentation of milk.[2] The bacteria used to make yogurt are known as yogurt cultures. Fermentation of sugars in the milk by these bacteria produces lactic acid, which acts on milk protein to give yogurt its texture and characteristic tart flavor.[2]Cow's milk is the milk most commonly used to make yogurt. Milk from water buffalo, goats, ewes, mares, camels, yaks and plant milks are also used to produce yogurt. The milk used may be homogenized or not. It may be pasteurized or raw. Each type of milk produces substantially different results.

Yogurt is produced using a culture of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus bacteria. In addition, other lactobacilli and bifidobacteria are sometimes added during or after culturing yogurt. Some countries require yogurt to contain a specific amount of colony-forming units (CFU) of bacteria; in China, for example, the requirement for the number of lactobacillus bacteria is at least 1 million CFU per milliliter.[3]

To produce yogurt, milk is first heated, usually to about 85 °C (185 °F), to denature the milk proteins so that they do not form curds. After heating, the milk is allowed to cool to about 45 °C (113 °F).[4] The bacterial culture is mixed in, and a warm temperature of 30-45 °C (86-113 °F) is maintained for 4 to 12 hours to allow fermentation to occur, with the higher temperatures working faster but risking a lumpy texture or whey separation.[5][6]

Etymology and spelling

The word is derived from Turkish: yoğurt,[7] and is usually related to the verb yoğurmak, "to knead", or "to be curdled or coagulated; to thicken".[7] It may be related to yoğun, meaning thick or dense. The sound ğ was traditionally rendered as "gh" in transliterations of Turkish from around 1615–1625.[7] In modern Turkish the letter ğ marks a diaeresis between two vowels, without being pronounced itself, which is reflected in some languages' versions of the word (e.g. Greek γιαούρτι giaoúrti, French yaourt, Romanian iaurt).

In English, the several variations of the spelling of the word include yogurt, yoghurt, and to a lesser extent yoghourt or yogourt.[7]

History

Analysis of the L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus genome indicates that the bacterium may have originated on the surface of a plant.[8] Milk may have become spontaneously and unintentionally exposed to it through contact with plants, or bacteria may have been transferred from the udder of domestic milk-producing animals.[9] The origins of yogurt are unknown, but it is thought to have been invented in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC.[10] In ancient Indian records, the combination of yogurt and honey is called "the food of the gods".[11] Persian traditions hold that "Abraham owed his fecundity and longevity to the regular ingestion of yogurt".[12]

The cuisine of ancient Greece included a dairy product known as oxygala (οξύγαλα) which was similar to yogurt.[13][14][15][16]Galen (AD 129 – c. 200/c. 216) mentioned that oxygala was consumed with honey, similar to the way thickened Greek yogurt is eaten today.[16][15] The oldest writings mentioning yogurt are attributed to Pliny the Elder, who remarked that certain "barbarous nations" knew how "to thicken the milk into a substance with an agreeable acidity".[17] The use of yogurt by medieval Turks is recorded in the books Dīwān Lughāt al-Turk by Mahmud Kashgari and Kutadgu Bilig by Yusuf Has Hajib written in the 11th century.[18][19] Both texts mention the word "yogurt" in different sections and describe its use by nomadic Turks.[18][19] The earliest yogurts were probably spontaneously fermented by wild bacteria in goat skin bags.[20]

Some accounts suggest that Mughal Indian emperor Akbar's cooks would flavor yogurt with mustard seeds and cinnamon.[21] Another early account of a European encounter with yogurt occurs in French clinical history: Francis I suffered from a severe diarrhea which no French doctor could cure. His ally Suleiman the Magnificent sent a doctor, who allegedly cured the patient with yogurt.[21][22] Being grateful, the French king spread around the information about the food that had cured him.

Until the 1900s, yogurt was a staple in diets of people in the Russian Empire (and especially Central Asia and the Caucasus), Western Asia, South Eastern Europe/Balkans, Central Europe, and the Indian subcontinent. Stamen Grigorov (1878–1945), a Bulgarian student of medicine in Geneva, first examined the microflora of the Bulgarian yogurt. In 1905, he described it as consisting of a spherical and a rod-like lactic acid-producing bacteria. In 1907, the rod-like bacterium was called Bacillus bulgaricus (now Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus). The Russian biologist and Nobel laureateIlya Mechnikov, from the Institut Pasteur in Paris, was influenced by Grigorov's work and hypothesized that regular consumption of yogurt was responsible for the unusually long lifespans of Bulgarian peasants.[23] Believing Lactobacillus to be essential for good health, Mechnikov worked to popularize yogurt as a foodstuff throughout Europe.

Isaac Carasso industrialized the production of yogurt. In 1919, Carasso, who was from OttomanSalonika, started a small yogurt business in Barcelona, Spain, and named the business Danone ("little Daniel") after his son. The brand later expanded to the United States under an Americanized version of the name: Dannon. Yogurt with added fruit jam was patented in 1933 by the Radlická Mlékárna dairy in Prague.[24]

Yogurt was introduced to the United States in the first decade of the twentieth century, influenced by Élie Metchnikoff's The Prolongation of Life; Optimistic Studies (1908); it was available in tablet form for those with digestive intolerance and for home culturing.[25] It was popularized by John Harvey Kellogg at the Battle Creek Sanitarium, where it was used both orally and in enemas,[26] and later by Armenian immigrants Sarkis and Rose Colombosian, who started "Colombo and Sons Creamery" in Andover, Massachusetts in 1929.[27][28]

Colombo Yogurt was originally delivered around New England in a horse-drawn wagon inscribed with the Armenian word "madzoon" which was later changed to "yogurt", the Turkish language name of the product, as Turkish was the lingua franca between immigrants of the various Near Eastern ethnicities who were the main consumers at that time. Yogurt's popularity in the United States was enhanced in the 1950s and 1960s, when it was presented as a health food by scientists like Hungarian-born bacteriologist Stephen A. Gaymont.[29] Plain yogurt still proved too sour for the American palate and in 1966 Colombo Yogurt sweetened the yogurt and added fruit preserves, creating "fruit on the bottom" style yogurt. This was successful and company sales soon exceeded $1 million per year.[30] By the late 20th century, yogurt had become a common American food item and Colombo Yogurt was sold in 1993 to General Mills, which discontinued the brand in 2010.[31]

Market and consumption

Yogurt in a refrigerator in a supermarket

In 2017, the average American ate 13.7 pounds of yogurt. The average consumption of yogurt has been declining since 2014.

Sale of yogurt was down 3.4 percent over the 12 months ending in February 2019. The decline of Greek-style yogurt has allowed Icelandic style yogurt to gain a foothold in the United States with sales of the Icelandic style yogurt increasing 24 percent in 2018 to $173 million.[32]

Nutrition

Yogurt (plain yogurt from whole milk) is 81% water, 9% protein, 5% fat, and 4% carbohydrates, including 4% sugars (table). A 100-gram amount provides 406 kilojoules (97 kcal) of dietary energy. As a proportion of the Daily Value (DV), a serving of yogurt is a rich source of vitamin B12 (31% DV) and riboflavin (23% DV), with moderate content of protein, phosphorus, and selenium (14 to 19% DV; table).

Tilde (~) represents missing or incomplete data. The above shows little difference exists between whole milk and yogurt made from whole milk with respect to the listed nutritional constituents.

Because it may contain live cultures, yogurt is often associated with probiotics, which have been postulated as having positive effects on immune, cardiovascular or metabolic health.[35][36][37] However, to date high-quality clinical evidence has been insufficient to conclude that consuming yogurt lowers the risk of diseases or otherwise improves health.[38][needs update]

Health and safety

Yogurt made with raw milk can be contaminated with bacteria that can cause significant illness and death, including Listeria, Cryptosporidium, Campylobacter, Brucella, E.Coli and Salmonella.[39] Yogurts can also be contaminated with Aflatoxin producing Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus parasiticus and Aspergillus nomius.[40]

Contamination occurs in traditionally prepared yogurts more often than industrially processed ones, but may affect the latter as well if manufacturing and packaging practices are suboptimal.[40]

When mold forms on yogurt it can not be scraped away. The consistency of yogurt allows the mold to penetrate deeply under the surface where it spreads.[41]

Varieties and presentation

Tzatzikior cacıkis a mezemade with yogurt, cucumber, olive oil and fresh mint or dill

Dahi is a yogurt from the Indian subcontinent, known for its characteristic taste and consistency. The word dahi seems to be derived from the Sanskrit word dadhi ("sour milk"), one of the five elixirs, or panchamrita, often used in Hindu ritual. Sweetened dahi (mishti doi or meethi dahi) is common in eastern parts of India, made by fermenting sweetened milk. While cow's milk is currently the primary ingredient for yogurt, goat and buffalo milk were widely used in the past, and valued for the fat content (see buffalo curd).

Dadiah or dadih is a traditional West Sumatran yogurt made from water buffalo milk, fermented in bamboo tubes.[42] Yogurt is common in Nepal, where it is served as both an appetizer and dessert. Locally called dahi, it is a part of the Nepali culture, used in local festivals, marriage ceremonies, parties, religious occasions, family gatherings, and so on. One Nepalese yogurt is called juju dhau, originating from the city of Bhaktapur. In Tibet, yak milk (technically dri milk, as the word yak refers to the male animal) is made into yogurt (and butter and cheese) and consumed.

In Northern Iran, Mâst Chekide is a variety of kefir yogurt with a distinct sour taste. It is usually mixed with a pesto-like water and fresh herb purée called delal. Common appetizers are spinach or eggplantborani, Mâst-o-Khiâr with cucumber, spring onions and herbs, and Mâst-Musir with wild shallots. In the summertime, yogurt and ice cubes are mixed together with cucumbers, raisins, salt, pepper and onions and topped with some croutons made of Persian traditional bread and served as a cold soup. Ashe-Mâst is a warm yogurt soup with fresh herbs, spinach and lentils. Even the leftover water extracted when straining yogurt is cooked to make a sour cream sauce called kashk, which is usually used as a topping on soups and stews.

Matsoni is a Georgian yogurt in the Caucasus and Russia. Tarator and Cacık are cold soups made from yogurt during summertime in eastern Europe. They are made with ayran, cucumbers, dill, salt, olive oil, and optionally garlic and ground walnuts. Tzatziki in Greece and milk salad in Bulgaria are thick yogurt-based salads similar to tarator.

Khyar w Laban (cucumber and yogurt salad) is a dish in Lebanon and Syria. Also, a wide variety of local Lebanese and Syrian dishes are cooked with yogurt like "Kibbi bi Laban" Rahmjoghurt, a creamy yogurt with much higher fat content (10%) than many yogurts offered in English-speaking countries. Dovga, a yogurt soup cooked with a variety of herbs and rice, is served warm in winter or refreshingly cold in summer. Jameed, yogurt salted and dried to preserve it, is consumed in Jordan. Zabadi is the type of yogurt made in Egypt, usually from the milk of the Egyptian water buffalo. It is particularly associated with Ramadan fasting, as it is thought to prevent thirst during all-day fasting.[43]

Sweetened and flavored

To offset its natural sourness, yogurt is also sold sweetened, sweetened and flavored or in containers with fruit or fruit jam on the bottom.[44] The two styles of yogurt commonly found in the grocery store are set-style yogurt and Swiss-style yogurt. Set-style yogurt is poured into individual containers to set, while Swiss-style yogurt is stirred prior to packaging. Either may have fruit added to increase sweetness.[44]

Lassi is a common Indian beverage made from stirred liquified yogurt that is either salted or sweetened with sugar commonly, less commonly honey and combined with fruit pulp to create flavored lassi.[45] Consistency can vary widely, with urban and commercial lassis having uniform texture through being processed, whereas rural and rustic lassi has discernible curds or fruit pulp.[45]

Large amounts of sugar – or other sweeteners for low-energy yogurts – are often used in commercial yogurt.[44][46] Some yogurts contain added modified starch,[47]pectin (found naturally in fruit) or gelatin to create thickness and creaminess. This type of yogurt may be marketed under the name Swiss-style, although it is unrelated to conventional Swiss yogurt. Some yogurts, often called "cream line", are made with whole milk which has not been homogenized so the cream rises to the top. In many countries, sweetened, flavored yogurt is common, typically sold in single-servingplastic cups.[44] Common flavors may include vanilla, honey, and toffee, and various fruits.[44][46] In the early 21st century, yogurt flavors inspired by desserts, such as chocolate or cheesecake, became common.[46] There is concern about the health effects of sweetened yogurt due to its high sugar content,[44] although research indicates that use of sugar in yogurt manufacturing has decreased since 2016 in response to WHO and government initiatives to combat obesity.[44][48]

Straining

Main article: Strained yogurt

A coffee filter used to strain yogurt in a home refrigerator.

Strained yogurt has been strained through a filter, traditionally made of muslin and more recently of paper or non-muslin cloth. This removes the whey, giving a much thicker consistency. Strained yogurt is made at home, especially if using skimmed milk which results in a thinner consistency.[49] Yogurt that has been strained to filter or remove the whey is known as Labneh in Middle Eastern countries. It has a consistency between that of yogurt and cheese. It may be used for sandwiches in Middle Eastern countries. Olive oil, cucumber slices, olives, and various green herbs may be added. It can be thickened further and rolled into balls, preserved in olive oil, and fermented for a few more weeks. It is sometimes used with onions, meat, and nuts as a stuffing for a variety of pies or kibbeh balls.

Some types of strained yogurts are boiled in open vats first, so that the liquid content is reduced. The East Indian dessert, a variation of traditional dahi called mishti dahi, offers a thicker, more custard-like consistency, and is usually sweeter than western yogurts.[50] In western Indian (Marathi and Gujarati) cuisine, strained yogurt is macerated with sugar and spices such as saffron, cardamom and nutmeg to make the dessert "shrikhand". Strained yogurt is also enjoyed in Greece and is the main component of tzatziki (from Turkish "cacık"), a well-known accompaniment to gyros and souvlaki pita sandwiches: it is a yogurt sauce or dip made with the addition of grated cucumber, olive oil, salt and, optionally, mashed garlic. Srikhand, a dessert in India, is made from strained yogurt, saffron, cardamom, nutmeg and sugar and sometimes fruits such as mango or pineapple.

In North America, strained yogurt is commonly called "Greek yogurt". Powdered milk is sometimes added in lieu of straining to achieve thickness. In Britain as "Greek-style yogurt". In Britain the name "Greek" may only be applied to yogurt made in Greece.[51]

Beverages

Ayran, doogh ("dawghe" in Neo-Aramaic) or dhallë is a yogurt-based, salty drink. It is made by mixing yogurt with water and (sometimes) salt.

Borhani (or burhani) is a spicy yogurt drink from Bangladesh. It is usually served with kacchi biryani at weddings and special feasts. Key ingredients are yogurt blended with mint leaves (mentha), mustard seeds and black rock salt (Kala Namak). Ground roasted cumin, ground white pepper, green chili pepper paste and sugar are often added.

Lassi is a yogurt-based beverage that is usually slightly salty or sweet, and may be commercially flavored with rosewater, mango or other fruit juice. Salty lassi is usually flavored with ground, roasted cumin and red chilies, may be made with buttermilk.

An unsweetened and unsalted yogurt drink usually called simply jogurt is consumed with burek and other baked goods in the Balkans. Sweetened yogurt drinks are the usual form in Europe (including the UK) and the US, containing fruit and added sweeteners. These are typically called "drinkable yogurt". Also available are "yogurt smoothies", which contain a higher proportion of fruit and are more like smoothies.

Plant-based yogurt

A variety of plant milk yogurts appeared in the 2000s, using soy milk, rice milk, and nut milks such as almond milk and coconut milk fermented with cultures. These yogurts may be suitable for people with lactose intolerance or those who prefer plant-based foods such as vegetarians or vegans.[52]Plant-based milks have different structures and components than dairy milk. Though they can be used to make many products similar to those made from dairy, there are differences in taste and texture. For example, "soy, almond, [and] coconut yogurts do not have the same delicate and smooth structure that conventional yogurts have."[53] Since plant-based milks do not contain lactose (the food of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus), plant-based yogurts usually contain different bacterial strains than a dairy yogurt, such as Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and Bifidobacterium bifidum.[54] Plant-based yogurts also vary considerably in their nutrition and ingredients, and may contain gums, stabilizers, high-intensity sweeteners, and artificial colors.[54]

In Europe, companies may not market their plant-based products using the word "yogurt" since that term is reserved for products of animal origin only — per European Union regulation 1308/2013 and a 2017 ruling in the Court of Justice of the European Union.[55][56]

Production

Commercially available home yogurt maker

Yogurt is made by heating milk to a temperature that denaturates its proteins (scalding), essential for making yogurt,[57] cooling it to a temperature that will not kill the live microorganisms that turn the milk into yogurt, inoculating certain bacteria (starter culture), usually Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus, into the milk, and finally keeping it warm for several hours. The milk may be held at 85 °C (185 °F) for a few minutes, or boiled (giving a somewhat different result). It must be cooled to 50 °C (122 °F) or somewhat less, typically 40–46 °C (104–115 °F). Starter culture must then be mixed in well, and the mixture must be kept undisturbed and warm for some time, anywhere between 5 and 12 hours. Longer fermentation times produces a more acidic yogurt. The starter culture may be a small amount of live (not sterilized) existing yogurt or commercially available dried starter culture.

Milk with a higher concentration of solids than normal milk may be used; the higher solids content produces a firmer yogurt. Solids can be increased by adding dried milk.[58] The yogurt-making process provides two significant barriers to pathogen growth, heat and acidity (low pH). Both are necessary to ensure a safe product. Acidity alone has been questioned by recent outbreaks of food poisoning by E. coli O157:H7 that is acid-tolerant. E. coli O157:H7 is easily destroyed by pasteurization (heating); the initial heating of the milk kills pathogens as well as denaturing proteins.[59] The microorganisms that turn milk into yogurt can tolerate higher temperatures than most pathogens, so that a suitable temperature not only encourages the formation of yogurt, but inhibits pathogenic microorganisms. Once the yogurt has formed it can, if desired, be strained to reduce the whey content and thicken it.

Commercial yogurt

Two types of yogurt are supported by the Codex Alimentarius for import and export.[60]

  • Pasteurized yogurt ("heat treated fermented milk")[60] is yogurt pasteurized to kill bacteria.[61]
  • Probiotic yogurt (labeled as "live yogurt" or "active yogurt") is yogurt pasteurized to kill bacteria, with Lactobacillus added in measured units before packaging.[dubious – discuss]
  • Yogurt probiotic drink is a drinkable yogurt pasteurized to kill bacteria, with Lactobacillus added before packaging.

Under US Food and Drug Administration regulations, milk must be pasteurized before it is cultured, and may optionally be heat treated after culturing to increase shelf life.[62] Most commercial yogurts in the United States are not heat treated after culturing, and contain live cultures.

Yogurt with live cultures[63][64][65] is more beneficial than pasteurized yogurt for people with lactose malabsorption.[66]

Lactose intolerance

Lactose intolerance is a condition in which people have symptoms due to the decreased ability to digest lactose, a sugar found in dairy products. In 2010, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) determined that lactose intolerance can be alleviated by ingesting live yogurt cultures (lactobacilli) that are able to digest the lactose in other dairy products.[66] The scientific review by EFSA enabled yogurt manufacturers to use a health claim on product labels, provided that the "yogurt should contain at least 108 CFU live starter microorganisms (Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus) per gram. The target population is individuals with lactose maldigestion."[66]

Gallery

  • Doogh is a savory yogurt-based beverage, traditionally served cold and is sometimes carbonated and seasoned with mint and salt.

  • Skyr is an Icelandic cultured dairy product, similar to strained yogurt traditionally served cold with milk and a topping of sugar

See also

References

  1. ^"YOGURT

    How to Buy the Healthiest Yogurt

    Nov. 18, 2013— -- intro:Yogurt has earned itself a reputation as a true health-food superstar. But know this: "Yogurt can turn into junk food really quickly," says Caroline Kaufman, RDN, a nutrition expert in San Francisco and an expert panelist for the Health Must-Eat List. Even if you skip the obvious offenders, like yogurts with crushed cookies or candy toppings, some pile on the sugar and excess calories. With so many choices out there—since 2010 alone, 671 new yogurt products have hit store shelves—how can you be sure you're choosing wisely? These guidelines will lead you to the standouts.

    quicklist: 1 category:How to Buy the Healthiest Yogurttitle:Keep it simpleurl:text:To make yogurt, all that's needed is milk and two live bacterial cultures, Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus, which turn the milk into yogurt via fermentation. "Beyond that, a few added extras for flavor, like a little sugar or some fruit, are fine," Kaufman says. Steer clear of products that have long lists of ingredients with things you can't pronounce or wouldn't expect to see in yogurt, like hydrogenated oils and artificial sweeteners.

    Best Superfoods for Weight Loss

    quicklist: 2 category:How to Buy the Healthiest Yogurttitle:Look for good bugsurl:text:Probiotics—good bacteria similar to the ones living in your digestive tract—are yogurt's key ingredient. These beneficial bugs have been shown to help with digestion and gut health. But surprisingly, not all yogurt sold in stores actually contains "live and active cultures," as the bacteria in yogurt are known. Some companies heat-treat yogurt after culturing, which kills off bacteria, both good and bad, to make it more shelf-stable and reduce tartness.

    quicklist: 3 category:How to Buy the Healthiest Yogurttitle:Make calcium counturl:text:Yogurt is a stellar source of bone-building calcium, but the amount can vary from brand to brand. Aim for one that has at least 15 percent of the daily value for calcium; the yogurts on our list contain anywhere from 15 to 35 percent.

    11 Foods for Healthy Bones

    quicklist: 4category:How to Buy the Healthiest Yogurttitle:Do a sugar checkurl:text:Trying to cut back on added sugar? Don't rely only on the number of grams listed on the label. Yogurt has a fair amount of naturally occurring milk sugar, aka lactose (about 9 grams in a 6-ounce container of plain regular yogurt, and about 7 grams in Greek yogurt), and the sugar figure includes both natural and added sugars. Our shortcut: Avoid any product that lists sugar as the first or second ingredient.

    quicklist: 5category:How to Buy the Healthiest Yogurttitle:Beware of fake fruiturl:text:Adding your own fresh fruit to plain yogurt is always a healthy choice. But sometimes you want the convenience of yogurt with fruit already added. Make sure you see actual fruit on the list of ingredients, ideally before any added sugars, Kaufman advises. "Otherwise it probably just contains a mix of sugar and food coloring or vegetable juice," she says.

    16 Ways to Lose Weight Fast

    quicklist: 6category:How to Buy the Healthiest Yogurttitle:Don't fear the faturl:text:Opting for nonfat yogurt can help you keep calories and saturated fat in check. But, Kaufman warns, "nonfat doesn't always mean low in calories. Many nonfat yogurts have a lot of added sugar." Go for a version that gets most of its sweetness from real fruit, or try adding a teaspoon of honey to plain nonfat yogurt.

    If you prefer the taste of a higher-fat yogurt, it's OK to move up to 1 or 2 percent. "Some new research indicates that saturated fat in dairy might not be the bad guy we once thought," Kaufman notes. For example, a 2011 study from Brown University found that eating dairy products wasn't linked to heart attack risk, "possibly because there are other protective nutrients in dairy that balance out the effects of saturated fat," she says. You can even go for full-fat if you have the cals to spare; just make it your saturated-fat splurge of the day.

    quicklist: 7category:How to Buy the Healthiest Yogurttitle:Read labels carefullyurl:text:Luckily, it's easy to tell if your yogurt includes probiotics. The National Yogurt Association has created a Live & Active Cultures seal for products that contain significant amounts of L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus. (These two bacteria, in particular, must be used in order for a product to be called "yogurt," per federal regulations. You might see additional cultures listed, but the research on their health benefits is still emerging; a yogurt that contains more cultures isn't necessarily better for you.) Not every company chooses to carry the seal, so you can also look for "Live and Active Cultures" on the label or L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus in the ingredient list. If a product has been heat-treated after culturing, the company is required to say so on the label.

    This article originally appeared on Health.com.

    Источник: https://abcnews.go.com/Health/buy-healthiest-yogurt/story?id=20905195

    There’s no denying that probiotics are ~buzzy~ in the food world right now. And for good reason: They support digestion, keep you regular, boost your immune system, and promote overall health.

    And while there are so many probiotics to choose from these days (kimchi! kombucha! sauerkraut! tempeh! miso!), don't forget about good ol' yogurt. "I’m all about the kombucha-on-tap life, but yogurt still holds a special place in my heart," says nutritionist Kelli McGrane, RD.

    To reap the most gut-healing benefits from your yogurt, be sure to check the label for the term “live active cultures,” and, particularly, a type of probiotic called lactobacillus acidophilus, says Juliana Dewsnap, RD, nutritionist for Baze. (Most product labels will call it out.)

    This especially trendy probiotic is known for supporting overall digestion, promoting healthy blood sugar, and even helping your body avoid yeast infections, says Dewsnap. Bonus: Since L. acidophilus also produces the enzyme lactase, yogurts containing it may be easier for people with dairy issues to digest (think of it as nature’s Lactaid pill!). What’s more is that studies suggest it may also reduce symptoms associated with irritable bowel syndrome, like pain and bloating, and reduce the itchiness and pain associated with eczema. Color me impressed.

    This content is imported from {embed-name}. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

    And, no, you don’t need to scarf down your yogurt plain to reap these benefits, either. With a little creativity, you can turn yogurt into a full-blown meal. (Trust me, you need yogurt topped with spicy chickpeas and lime in your life, stat).

    Ready to treat your tummy and taste buds? Here are the best probiotic yogurts on the market, according to nutritionists


    Vanilla Whole-Milk Yogurt

    Siggi'starget.com

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    1. Siggi’s Icelandic Skyr

    "Siggi's, an Icelandic style of yogurt called skyr, is creamier and thicker than Greek yogurt," says dietitian Leigh Tracy, RD. "It's also low in added sugar and contains live active bacteria to help promote gut health."

    Per serving: 130 calories, 4.5 g fat (3 g sat), 11 g carbs, 60 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 8 g sugar, 12 g protein


    Strawberry Yogurt

    Yoplaittarget.com

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    2. Yoplait Light

    Dewsnap loves Yoplait Light's tasty flavors, especially the strawberry. Since they're plenty sweet, just go easy on sweet toppings like fruit.

    Per serving: 90 calories, 0 g fat (0 g sat), 16 g carbs, 105 mg sodium, 10 g sugar, 5 g protein


    2% Milkfat Plain Greek Yogurt

    Fagetarget.com

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    3. Fage Total

    "Greek yogurt contains more protein than regular yogurt and has a thicker texture," says McGrane. Fage Total Greek Yogurt is a great swap-in for sour cream and works wonders in smoothies.

    Per serving: 150 calories, 4 g fat (3 g sat), 8 g carbs, 65 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 8 g sugar, 20 g protein


    Plain Whole Milk Yogurt

    Stonyfieldtarget.com

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    4. Stonyfield Farm Organic

    "Both [Stonyfield's] regular and Greek yogurts are non-GMO, free of growth hormones, and contain excellent sources of live active cultures," says McGrane. They also offer soy yogurt, which is a good source of probiotics for dairy-free eaters.

    Per serving: 170 calories, 9 g fat (5 g sat), 13 g carbs, 125 mg sodium, 0g fiber, 12 g sugar, 9 g protein


    Plain Cream Top Whole Milk Yogurt

    Brown Cowsafeway.com

    $4.99

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    5. Brown Cow

    "Traditional, unstrained yogurt tends to get overshadowed by Greek yogurt, but it can be just as healthy," says McGrane. Brown Cow's yogurt may have less protein, but it still provides those essential probiotics, including L. acidophilus.

    Per serving: 130 calories, 7 g fat (4.5 g sat), 9 g carbs, 95 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 9 g sugar, 6 g protein


    Non-Fat Plain Greek Yogurt

    target.com

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    6. Chobani

    This simple yogurt is low in sugar, so you can add plenty of your own toppings, like fruit, nuts, and seeds, says Dewsnap. Plus, its 14 grams of protein help keep you satiated for way longer.

    Per serving: 80 calories, 0 g fat (o g sat), 6 g carbs, 55 mg sodium, 4 g sugar, 14 g protein


    Probiotic Plain Lowfat Yogurt

    Nancy'sinstacart.com

    $32.00

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    7. Nancy's Organic

    Dewsnap loves Nancy's Organic yogurts because they're rich in probiotics and delicious flavor. You can get them in bigger bulk servings to keep on hand throughout the week, too. Since their plain version is a little higher in sugar, top it with some fats and proteins for balance.

    Per serving: 140 calories, 3 g fat (2 g sat), 160 mg sodium, 16 g carbs, 16 g sugar, 11 g protein


    Plain 100% Grass-Fed Whole Milk Cream On Top Yogurt

    Maple Hill Creamerywegmans.com

    $5.49

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    8. Maple Hill Creamery

    Made with whole milk, this pick is creamy, rich, and super satiating, says Dewsnap. Since it's higher in sugar than protein, be sure to top it with additional protein, like hemp hearts.

    Per serving: 170 calories, 10 g fat (7 g sat), 110 mg sodium, 11 g carbs, 0 g fiber, 11 g sugar, 8 g protein


    Plain Aussie Greek Style Whole Milk Yogurt

    Wallaby Organic instacart.com

    $7.99

    SHOP NOW

    9. Wallaby Organic

    "Australian yogurt is perfect for those who want a texture somewhere between traditional and Greek yogurt," says McGrane, who recommends Wallaby for its taste and probiotic content.

    Per serving: 220 calories, 11 g fat (7 g sat), 90 mg sodium, 10 g carbs, 0 g fiber, 7 g sugar, 21 g protein


    Lemon Australian-Style Yoghurt

    target.com

    SHOP NOW

    10. Noosa

    Another Australian yogurt pick from McGrane, Noosa has a nice texture and a solid dose of fats and gut-regulating bacteria. Since the flavored varieties are high in sugar, enjoy them as an occasional treat. Otherwise, stick with plain.

    Per serving: 320 calories, 13 g fat (8 g sat), 110mg sodium, 39 g carbs, 0g fiber, 35 g sugar, 12 g protein

    Isadora BaumIsadora Baum is a freelance writer, certified health coach, and author of 5-Minute Energy.

    Marissa MillerMarissa Miller has spent a decade editing and reporting on women’s health issues from an intersectional lens with a focus on peer-reviewed nutrition, fitness trends, mental health, skincare, reproductive rights and beyond, and currently holds a certificate in plant-based nutrition from Cornell.

    This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

    Источник: https://www.womenshealthmag.com/food/a19891629/best-probiotic-yogurts/

    Yogurt vs. Probiotic Supplements: Which is More Effective?

    Your digestive tract is home to a population of microorganisms numbering in the trillions. The good bacterial strains that live in your gut—also known as your gut microbiome—play a key role in the proper functioning of everything from your immune system to your metabolism. Supporting your gut microbiome by introducing good bacteria into your digestive system is one of the best ways to support your body's overall health.

    Probiotics are beneficial bacterial strains which can be found in a number of sources -  but two, in particular, stand out thanks to their popularity: yogurt and probiotic supplements. Both help to augment your body's existing healthy bacteria population, and adding either to your daily routine is better than nothing. Head-to-head, however, which is more effective when it comes to introducing a broad range of probiotics to your body?

    In short: probiotic supplements are more effective than yogurt at providing the optimal numbers and variety of probiotics—and here's why:

    Why Yogurt Falls Short

    While yogurt may help provide some level of digestive support and can be a delicious addition to any diet, it simply can't compete with the best probiotic supplements for women, men, and children. There are a number of factors that cause this dairy product to come up short in delivering both high numbers of probiotics and the right probiotic strains to benefit your digestive tract.

    For starters, only a few types of probiotics naturally occur in yogurt. These strains—Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, and Streptococcus Thermophilus—do provide certain health benefits, of course. However, with more than 500 different strains of probiotics in existence, your daily probiotic yogurt will fall far short of providing you with the best overall diversity of potentially-beneficial bugs.

    Even though the strains of naturally-occurring probiotics in yogurt are beneficial, your yogurt may simply not have enough of it to be helpful. In order to receive the full benefit of probiotic potency, you’d need to eat more than a dozen yogurts to match the potency of an adult dose of LoveBug probiotics. In reviewing the current body of scientific research on the subject, one group of researchers at the University of Toronto found that many of the studies that touted yogurt's benefits were funded by the food industry itself and utilized probiotic doses that were as much as 25 times the amount actually in yogurt.

    That's another key drawback of relying on yogurt as a probiotic source: the massive amounts of added sugar. Many studies have been conducted to investigate the effects of yogurt consumption directly on conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). What isn't necessarily apparent from the often-positive results of these studies, however, is that participants needed to eat yogurt two or three times every day in order to see any positive probiotic benefits, but the sugar consumption of that yogurt bender would only feed the bad bacteria in your gut - and who really wants to consume that much yogurt, anyway?

    Probiotics and Yogurt

    Finally, while some yogurts are probiotic-rich, many yogurts on the market have no active probiotic strains at all. Many of the pasteurization and sterilization processes that commercially-available yogurt is subjected to kills all the live microorganisms that otherwise naturally occur in yogurt. Even when yogurt does have live probiotics, the particular type of starter culture used to produce the yogurt can have a huge effect on how many active probiotic strains survive until you take that first bite. A study conducted by researchers at California Polytechnic State University found that the number of viable probiotic strains in different yogurts can be reduced exponentially if certain starter cultures are used.

    In other words, you shouldn't assume that the yogurt you're eating has probiotics. Some yogurt brands (voluntarily) label their yogurts with the National Yogurt Association's "Live and Active Cultures" seal, which indicates that the yogurt has a minimum level of live lactic acid bacteria—but this seal isn't required to be used, and even when it is, the numbers and variety of probiotics in the yogurt can still be insufficient to confer all the potential health benefits.

    And as we’ve already mentioned, many yogurts have high amounts of high fructose corn syrup, processed sugar, and other less-than-healthy ingredients that can mess with your gut. So it becomes clear: eat yogurt as a treat but take a probiotic supplement for your populating the beneficial bacteria in your gut.

    More Potent Probiotic Foods

    Kefir, another fermented milk product, has many important nutrients and far more probiotic cultures compared to yogurt to help aid and balance your gut bacteria. Kefir has 30 types of probiotic yeasts and beneficial bacteria—that's approximately three times the number of probiotic cultures compared to yogurt! It also a great source of protein, calcium, and potassium and is effective in reducing a whole host of digestive issues, lowering blood pressure and cholesterol, and even seen to be helpful in treating UTIs and vaginal infections.

    Another probiotic food you may want to give a try is buttermilk. Aside from being a great source of probiotics, buttermilk also has essential nutrients such as vitamins, enzymes, carbohydrates, and proteins. Because it is so high in water content, it also helps keep you stay hydrated and improve digestion. Check out our post, What Do Probiotics and Water Have in Common, if you are interested in more about that.

    What to Look For in Your Probiotic Supplement

    While taking a probiotic supplement can be more effective than yogurt at introducing all that beneficial bacteria into your digestive system, keep in mind that not all supplements are created equal. Your probiotic supplement can beat yogurt's probiotic benefits if you pick one that displays certain key characteristics.

    The number of live bacterial strains in the supplement is obviously a key factor in its efficacy. The bare minimum amount of bacteria needed to be considered effective is 1 billion colony forming units (also known as CFUs) per day. If the supplement you're considering doesn't list the number of CFUs it has, there's reason for concern: testing company ConsumerLab.com found that many of the probiotic supplements they tested that did not specify their CFUs with live bacteria numbering in just the thousands, which is far too little be effective.

    The specific types of bacteria in the supplement is also important, as different strains can help with different health concerns. For example, Lactobacillus acidophilus has been shown to reduce cholesterol, while Lactobacillus plantarum has proven effective in reducing the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. Other strains have been shown to improve immune function, reduce inflammation, combat the effects of diarrhea, and more. Finding a supplement that has the right diversity of strains to address your particular health issues is key to getting the biggest benefit from your probiotic.

    The delivery system that a probiotic supplement uses is equally important as the number and variety of live cultures the supplement has. Why? It's simple: while many supplements cite the number of organisms they have at the point when they were manufactured, this number is meaningless if the supplement's delivery system doesn't protect the strains from the harsh and acidic environment of your stomach. Without a proper delivery system, many types of probiotic bacteria are killed off by the stomach acids before they can reach your intestinal tract and start to colonize your gut. This is why the number of viable microorganisms that your supplement can introduce to your gut microbiome is the key number to consider.

    LoveBug Probiotics have 15 times more survivability than standard capsules thanks to our patented, scientifically proven delivery technology, BIO-tract®. That means our probiotic supplements are uniquely equipped to support gut health to the fullest extent and provide numerous other health benefits.

    What Makes Our Probiotic Supplements Different?

    For many people, other factors can be a consideration when choosing a probiotic that may not directly influence the supplement's effectiveness but can increase the likelihood that they'll be able to maintain it as part of their daily routine.

    The presence of unnecessary additives is increasingly concerning to many American consumers. We’re picky here at LoveBug - because we’re passionate moms. Similarly, we invite you to take a look to see if the probiotic supplement you're considering has ingredients such as gluten, soy, sugar, nuts, dairy or GMO’s. LoveBug probiotics are free of all these additives, allergens, and unwanted ingredients.

    Lastly, some probiotic supplements must be refrigerated to keep their strains alive, but ours are shelf-stable at room temperature. If you can't reliably keep your probiotic refrigerated until you take it, question the efficacy. LoveBug probiotics do not need to be refrigerated due to our BIO-tract® technology.

    Remember: your probiotic supplement is more effective than a cup of yogurt, but only if you take it on a daily basis.

    The benefits of probiotics are both cumulative and vast. At LoveBug, we've created specific probiotics for the whole family. We’ve created probiotics for all ages and stages - because we want you to feel good from the inside out!

    [callout]

    Feel the LoveBug Difference

    Protect and nurture the health of your whole family with LoveBug Probiotics.

    Feel good from the inside out!

    [/callout]

    References

    Chiang BL, Sheih YH, Wang LH, Liao CK, Gill HS (2000). Enhancing immunity by dietary consumption of a probiotic lactic acid bacterium (Bifidobacterium lactis HN019): optimization and definition of cellular immune responses. Eur J Clin Nutr 54, 849–855.

    Hungin APS, Chang L, Locke GR et al. Irritable bowel Syndrome in the United States: Prevalence, symptoms patterns and impact. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2005;21:1365–1375.

    Scourboutakos, M.J.; Franco-Arellano, B.; Murphy, S.A.; Norsen, S.; Comelli, E.M.; L’Abbé, M.R. Mismatch between Probiotic Benefits in Trials versus Food Products. Nutrients 2017, 9, 400.

    Источник: https://lovebugprobiotics.com/blogs/news/yogurt-vs-probiotic-supplements-which-is-more-effective

    6 Side Effects of Eating Yogurt Every Day

    Greek. Icelandic. Probiotic. Soy. Whichever your go-to yogurt type is, you're likely well aware by now that this food comes with more than a few health benefits. Yogurt has long been associated with bone strength, gut health, and weight management. But do you know the other side effects of eating yogurt every day? Because that's only the beginning.

    "Current available scientific evidence shows that intake of yogurt, milk, and other dairy products have very few adverse effects and may protect against many of the most prevalent chronic diseases," says Brooke Glazer, RDN, nutrition consultant for RSP Nutrition. "Frequent consumption of yogurt has been shown to improve risk factors for cardiovascular disease, to lower diabetes risk, and to enhance immune function."

    According to a 2018 report, the average American consumes about 13.4 pounds of yogurt per year. And is that any surprise? This dairy product is not only super good for you, but it's also remarkably versatile—you can use it as a base for your morning bowl of granola, as a convenient portable snack for work, or even as a healthy dessert. Nowadays, there are more options than ever to choose from, too, including protein-rich yogurt-based drinks and even frozen treats.

    If you're someone who consistently stocks your fridge with yogurt, it's important to know the side effects that eating yogurt every day can cause. Here are some health perks—and potential pitfalls—that nutritionists and dietitians want you to know about.

    peach yogurt

    While the word "bacteria" may automatically trigger negative associations, there are also "good" bacteria that are essential to making sure your digestive tract functions properly. According to Glazer, probiotics are live microorganisms found in certain foods that can promote the development of more of that good bacteria.

    "I always suggest getting your needs met from whole foods rather than from supplements so yogurt is a great option to increase probiotic intake," she says.

    As certified nutritionist Paul Claybrook, MS, MBA, CN, points out, probiotics can also kill off harmful bacteria in your digestive tract.

    "There is only so much room in your intestines and so bacteria are constantly battling for control," he says. "When you consume probiotics regularly, you are ensuring that the 'good' bacteria are in charge."

    According to Lindsey Kane, RD and Director of Nutrition at Sun Basket, maintaining a healthy microbiome promotes bowel regularity, reduces bloating and general GI discomfort, and mitigates symptoms associated with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and IBS.

    Unfortunately, not all yogurts are created equal in regards to probiotics.

    "Most yogurts undergo pasteurization after fermentation, and this pasteurization process destroys the fragile probiotics cultivated during fermentation, causing you to lose out on any of the benefits they once had to offer," says Kane.

    Hence, Kane and Claybrook both recommend choosing yogurt with a label that indicates it contains live and active cultures.

    Persimmon pomegranate yogurt bowl

    Provided you're opting for a product that's high in protein (such as Greek-style yogurt), there's a good chance that you'll feel satisfied after eating it. This is especially true if the yogurt isn't nonfat.

    "Yogurt is a nutritional powerhouse—it is full of protein, fat, and carbohydrates, the triple threat for long-lasting satiety and energy," says Kane.

    This is why yogurt is such an ideal snack option for keeping those hunger pangs at bay.

    Man scooping into yogurt fruit granola breakfast bowl

    Speaking of probiotics, Glazer notes that having a healthy gut plays a key role in making sure you can fend off illness by regulating what gets to pass through the lining and enter your bloodstream.

    "Kind of like a bouncer that decides who gets to come into a nightclub, our microbiome prevents dangerous bacteria from getting inside our body, thereby aiding immune function," says Glazer. "Since yogurt contains probiotics that create a healthier gut and the gut regulates immune function, eating yogurt can improve immunity."

    Kane also points out that probiotics have been shown to prompt the synthesis of natural antibodies and immune cells like lymphocytes and Natural Killer T cells, which can attack invading viruses and toxins.

    Greek yogurt on checkered place setting

    Some brands add a hefty amount of sugar to their flavored yogurt products. While that may make it taste good, it can also cause your blood sugar to surge. That's why Glazer highly recommends taking a look at the nutrition facts on your yogurt before digging in.

    "Some flavored yogurts have 14 grams of sugar per serving so you're getting 3.5 sugar packets in your otherwise healthy yogurt," she says.

    Considering that the American Heart Association recommends consuming a maximum of 25 grams of added sugar per day for women and 37g for men, that's definitely something to keep an eye on.

    "While no one food will make or break your health, too much added sugar not only dilutes the nutritional density of yogurt, but it can also cause a spike in your blood sugar, leaving you hungry and hangry rather than satiated, satisfied and energized," says Kane.

    If you're trying to limit your consumption of the sweet stuff, try plain Greek yogurt—and you can even add a serving fruit on top if it's too tangy for your liking.

    "Naturally occurring sugars, such as from the blueberries, are just fine—they are not exactly the same thing as added sugars," says Claybrook. "Added sugars should always be avoided."

    Kane suggests drizzling on a spoonful of honey or maple syrup to balance out the acidity of plain yogurt if you're not a fan of the flavor.

    "A dash of vanilla or a pinch of cinnamon also works wonders in creating a sense of sweetness without actually adding any sugar at all," she says.

    Greek yogurt with frozen blueberry sauce granola

    Remember those friendly flora mentioned earlier? According to Kane, probiotics don't just positively impact your physical health, but your mental health as well.

    An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that the gut-brain connection definitely exists—and Kane notes that some research has found probiotics to improve anxiety, depression, stress, mood, and memory. While you likely won't notice these effects after just one serving of yogurt, if you're eating it on a regular basis, it could definitely make a difference over time.

    Yogurt granola berries

    In addition to probiotics, yogurt is packed with so many other nutrients that your body can benefit from. For example, Kane says you'll get a decent dose of calcium (for healthy teeth and bones), phosphorus (more bone health), magnesium (which supports energy metabolism, sleep, and mood), and potassium (which regulates blood pressure and muscle mobility and recovery). And that's not all, either.

    "Probiotics actually produce vitamin K as well, which is used for healthy blood coagulation (clotting) to support healing," says Kane.

    The best way to ensure that you're reaping the full health benefits of yogurt is to take a close and careful look at the nutrition label before adding it to your shopping cart. Ideally, Kane advises selecting one that contains multiple strains of bacteria.

    "Think of this as diversifying your roster for a sports team," she explains. "You need all sorts of players to build a versatile unit, each contributing different skills and talents to create a strong and resilient squad capable of handling any opponent that comes their way."

    Other than that, as long as you go for a product that doesn't contain heaps of added sugar, yogurt can definitely be a super healthy component of your daily diet.

    Get creative with these 26 Things You Can Make with Yogurt.

    Rebecca Strong

    Rebecca Strong is a Boston-based freelance health, wellness, and lifestyle writer who has contributed to INSIDER, HuffPost, Bustle, Elite Daily, POPSUGAR, StyleCaster, and AskMen. Read more

    Источник: https://www.eatthis.com/side-effects-eating-yogurt-every-day/

    6 Side Effects of Eating Yogurt Every Day

    Greek. Icelandic. Probiotic. Soy. Whichever your go-to yogurt type is, you're likely well aware by now that this food comes with more than a few health benefits. Yogurt has long been associated with bone strength, gut health, and weight management. But do you know the other side effects of eating yogurt every day? Because that's only the beginning.

    "Current available scientific evidence shows that intake of yogurt, milk, and other dairy products have very few adverse effects and may protect against many of the most prevalent chronic diseases," says Brooke Glazer, RDN, nutrition consultant for RSP Nutrition. "Frequent consumption of yogurt has been shown to improve risk factors for cardiovascular disease, to lower diabetes risk, and to enhance immune function."

    According to a 2018 report, the average American consumes about 13.4 pounds of yogurt per year. And is that any surprise? This dairy product is not only super good for you, but it's also remarkably versatile—you can use it as a base for your morning bowl of granola, as a convenient portable snack for work, or even as a healthy dessert. Nowadays, there are more options than ever to choose from, too, including protein-rich yogurt-based drinks and even frozen treats.

    If you're someone who consistently stocks your fridge with yogurt, it's important to know the side effects that eating yogurt every day can cause. Here are some health perks—and potential pitfalls—that nutritionists and dietitians want you to know about.

    peach yogurt

    While the word "bacteria" may automatically trigger negative associations, there are also "good" bacteria that are essential to making sure your digestive tract functions properly. According to Glazer, probiotics are live microorganisms found in certain foods that can promote the development of more of that good bacteria.

    "I always suggest getting your needs met from whole foods rather than from supplements so yogurt is a great access bank transfer code to increase probiotic intake," she says.

    As certified nutritionist Paul Claybrook, MS, MBA, CN, points out, probiotics can also kill off harmful bacteria in your digestive tract.

    "There is only so much room in your intestines and so bacteria are constantly battling for control," he says. "When you consume probiotics regularly, you are ensuring that the 'good' bacteria are in charge."

    According to Lindsey Kane, RD and Director of Nutrition at Sun Basket, maintaining a healthy microbiome promotes bowel regularity, reduces bloating and general GI discomfort, and mitigates symptoms associated with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and IBS.

    Unfortunately, not all yogurts are created equal in regards to probiotics.

    "Most yogurts undergo pasteurization after fermentation, and this pasteurization process destroys the fragile probiotics cultivated during fermentation, causing you to lose out on any of the benefits they once had to offer," says Kane.

    Hence, Kane and Claybrook both recommend choosing yogurt with a label that indicates it contains live and active cultures.

    Persimmon pomegranate yogurt bowl

    Provided you're opting for a product that's high in protein (such as Greek-style yogurt), there's a good chance that you'll feel satisfied after eating it. This is especially true if the yogurt isn't nonfat.

    "Yogurt is a nutritional powerhouse—it is full of protein, fat, and carbohydrates, the triple threat for long-lasting satiety and energy," says Kane.

    This is why yogurt is such an ideal snack option for keeping those hunger pangs at bay.

    Man scooping into yogurt fruit granola breakfast bowl

    Speaking of probiotics, Glazer notes that having a healthy gut plays a key role in making sure you can fend off illness by regulating what gets to pass through the lining and enter your bloodstream.

    "Kind of like a bouncer that decides who gets to come into a nightclub, our microbiome prevents dangerous bacteria from getting inside our body, thereby aiding immune function," says Glazer. "Since yogurt contains probiotics that create a healthier gut and the gut regulates immune function, eating yogurt can improve immunity."

    Kane also points out that probiotics have been shown to prompt the synthesis of natural antibodies and immune cells like lymphocytes and Natural Killer T cells, which can attack invading viruses and toxins.

    Greek yogurt on checkered place setting

    Some brands add a hefty amount of sugar to their flavored yogurt products. While that may make it taste good, it can also cause your blood sugar to surge. That's why Glazer highly recommends taking a look at the nutrition facts on your yogurt before digging in.

    "Some flavored yogurts have 14 grams of sugar per serving so you're getting 3.5 sugar packets in your otherwise healthy yogurt," she says.

    Considering that the American Heart Association recommends consuming a maximum of 25 grams of added sugar per day for women and 37g for men, that's definitely something to keep an eye on.

    "While no one food will make or break your health, too much added sugar not only dilutes the nutritional density of yogurt, but it can also cause a spike in your blood sugar, leaving you hungry and hangry rather than satiated, satisfied and energized," says Kane.

    If you're trying to limit your consumption of the sweet stuff, try plain Greek yogurt—and you can even add a serving fruit on top if it's too tangy for your liking.

    "Naturally occurring sugars, such as from the blueberries, are just fine—they are not exactly the same thing as added sugars," says Claybrook. "Added sugars online banking bancorp always be avoided."

    Kane suggests drizzling on a spoonful of honey or maple syrup to balance out the acidity of plain yogurt if you're not a fan of the flavor.

    "A dash of vanilla or a pinch of cinnamon also works wonders in creating a sense of sweetness without actually adding any sugar at all," she says.

    Greek yogurt with frozen blueberry sauce granola

    Remember those friendly flora mentioned earlier? According to Kane, probiotics don't just positively impact your physical health, but your mental health as well.

    An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that the gut-brain connection definitely exists—and Kane notes that some research has found probiotics to improve anxiety, depression, stress, mood, and memory. While you likely won't notice these effects after just one serving of yogurt, if you're eating it on a regular basis, it could definitely make a difference over time.

    Yogurt granola berries

    In addition to probiotics, yogurt is packed with so many other nutrients that your body can benefit from. For example, Kane says you'll get a decent dose of calcium (for healthy teeth and bones), phosphorus (more bone health), magnesium (which supports energy metabolism, sleep, and mood), and potassium (which regulates blood pressure and muscle mobility and recovery). And that's not all, either.

    "Probiotics actually produce vitamin K as well, which is used for healthy blood coagulation (clotting) to support healing," says Kane.

    The best way to ensure that you're reaping the full health benefits of yogurt is to take a close and careful look at the nutrition label before adding it to your shopping cart. Ideally, Kane advises selecting one that contains multiple strains of bacteria.

    "Think of this as diversifying your roster for a sports team," she explains. "You need all sorts of players to build a versatile unit, each contributing different skills and talents to create a strong and resilient squad capable of handling any opponent that comes their way."

    Other than that, as long as you go for a product that doesn't contain heaps of added sugar, yogurt can definitely be a super healthy component of your daily diet.

    Get creative with these 26 Things You Can Make with Yogurt.

    Rebecca Strong

    Rebecca Strong is a Boston-based freelance health, wellness, and lifestyle writer who has contributed to INSIDER, HuffPost, Bustle, Elite Daily, POPSUGAR, StyleCaster, and AskMen. Read more

    Источник: https://www.eatthis.com/side-effects-eating-yogurt-every-day/

    Yogurt

    Food produced by bacterial fermentation of milk

    For other uses, see Yogurt (disambiguation).

    Yogurt (; ,[1] from Turkish: yoğurt) also spelled yoghurt, yogourt or yoghourt, is a food produced by bacterialfermentation of milk.[2] The bacteria used to make yogurt are known as yogurt cultures. Fermentation of sugars in the milk by these bacteria produces lactic acid, which acts on milk protein to give yogurt its texture and characteristic tart flavor.[2]Cow's milk is the milk most commonly used to make yogurt. Milk from water buffalo, goats, ewes, mares, camels, yaks and plant milks are also used to produce yogurt. The milk used may be homogenized or not. It may be pasteurized or raw. Each type of milk produces substantially different results.

    Yogurt is produced using a culture of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus bacteria. In addition, other lactobacilli and bifidobacteria are sometimes added during or after culturing yogurt. Some countries require yogurt to contain a specific amount of colony-forming units (CFU) of bacteria; in China, for example, the requirement for the number of lactobacillus bacteria is at least 1 million CFU per milliliter.[3]

    To produce yogurt, milk is first heated, usually to about 85 °C (185 °F), to denature the milk proteins so that they do not form curds. After heating, the milk is allowed to cool to about 45 °C (113 °F).[4] The bacterial culture is mixed in, and a warm temperature of 30-45 °C (86-113 °F) is maintained for 4 to 12 hours to allow fermentation to occur, with the higher temperatures working faster but risking a lumpy texture or whey separation.[5][6]

    Etymology and spelling

    The word is derived from Turkish: yoğurt,[7] and is usually related to the verb yoğurmak, "to knead", or "to be curdled or coagulated; to thicken".[7] It may be related to yoğun, meaning thick or dense. The sound ğ was traditionally rendered as "gh" in transliterations of Turkish from around 1615–1625.[7] In modern Turkish the letter ğ marks a diaeresis between two vowels, without being pronounced itself, which is reflected in some languages' versions of the word (e.g. Greek γιαούρτι giaoúrti, French yaourt, Romanian iaurt).

    In English, the several variations of the spelling of the word include yogurt, yoghurt, and to a lesser extent yoghourt or yogourt.[7]

    History

    Analysis of the L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus genome indicates that the bacterium may have originated on the surface of a plant.[8] Milk may have become spontaneously and unintentionally exposed to it through contact with plants, or bacteria may have been transferred from the udder of domestic milk-producing animals.[9] The origins of yogurt are unknown, but it is thought to have been invented in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC.[10] In ancient Indian records, the combination of yogurt and honey is called "the food of the gods".[11] Persian traditions hold that "Abraham owed his fecundity and longevity to the regular ingestion of yogurt".[12]

    The cuisine of ancient Greece included a dairy product known as oxygala (οξύγαλα) which was similar to yogurt.[13][14][15][16]Galen (AD 129 – c. 200/c. 216) mentioned that oxygala was consumed with honey, similar to the way thickened Greek yogurt is eaten today.[16][15] The oldest writings mentioning yogurt are attributed to Pliny the Elder, who remarked that certain "barbarous nations" knew how "to thicken the milk into a substance with an agreeable acidity".[17] The use of yogurt by medieval Turks is recorded in the books Dīwān Lughāt al-Turk by Mahmud Kashgari and Kutadgu Bilig by Yusuf Has Hajib written in the 11th century.[18][19] Both texts mention the word "yogurt" in different sections and describe its use by nomadic Turks.[18][19] The earliest yogurts were probably spontaneously fermented by wild bacteria in goat skin bags.[20]

    Some accounts suggest that Mughal Indian emperor Akbar's cooks would flavor yogurt with mustard seeds and cinnamon.[21] Another early account of a European encounter with yogurt occurs in French clinical history: Francis I suffered from a severe diarrhea which no French doctor could cure. His ally Suleiman the Magnificent sent a doctor, who allegedly cured the patient with yogurt.[21][22] Being grateful, the French king spread around the information about the food that had cured him.

    Until the 1900s, yogurt was a staple in diets of people in the Russian Empire (and especially Central Asia and the Caucasus), Western Asia, South Eastern Europe/Balkans, Central Europe, and the Indian subcontinent. Stamen Grigorov (1878–1945), a Bulgarian student of medicine in Geneva, first examined the microflora of the Bulgarian yogurt. In 1905, he described it as consisting of a spherical and a rod-like lactic acid-producing bacteria. In 1907, the rod-like bacterium was called Bacillus bulgaricus (now Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus). The Russian biologist and Nobel laureateIlya Mechnikov, from the Institut Pasteur in Paris, was influenced by Grigorov's work and hypothesized that regular consumption of yogurt was responsible for the unusually bank holiday monday august 2019 lifespans of Bulgarian peasants.[23] Believing Lactobacillus to be essential for good health, Mechnikov worked to popularize yogurt as a foodstuff throughout Europe.

    Isaac Carasso industrialized the production of yogurt. In 1919, Carasso, who was from OttomanSalonika, started a small yogurt business in Barcelona, Spain, and named the business Danone ("little Daniel") after his son. The brand later expanded to the United States under an Americanized version of the name: Dannon. Yogurt with added fruit jam was patented in 1933 by the Radlická Mlékárna dairy in Prague.[24]

    Yogurt was introduced to the United States in the first decade of the twentieth century, influenced by Élie Metchnikoff's The Prolongation of Life; Optimistic Studies (1908); it was available in tablet form for those with digestive intolerance and for home culturing.[25] It was popularized by John Harvey Kellogg at the Battle Creek Sanitarium, where it was used both orally and in enemas,[26] and later by Armenian immigrants Sarkis and Rose Colombosian, who started "Colombo and Sons Creamery" in Andover, Massachusetts in 1929.[27][28]

    Colombo Yogurt was originally delivered around New England in a horse-drawn wagon inscribed with the Armenian word "madzoon" which was later changed to "yogurt", the Turkish language name of the product, as Turkish was the lingua franca between immigrants of the various Near Eastern ethnicities who were the main consumers at that time. Yogurt's popularity in the United States was enhanced in the 1950s and 1960s, when it was presented as a health food by scientists like Hungarian-born bacteriologist Stephen A. Gaymont.[29] Plain yogurt still proved too sour for the American palate and in 1966 Colombo Yogurt sweetened the yogurt and added fruit preserves, creating "fruit on the bottom" style yogurt. This was successful and company sales soon exceeded $1 million per year.[30] By the late 20th century, yogurt had become a common American food item and Colombo Yogurt was sold in 1993 to General Mills, which discontinued the brand in 2010.[31]

    Market and consumption

    Yogurt in a refrigerator in a supermarket

    In 2017, the average American ate 13.7 pounds of yogurt. The average consumption of yogurt has been declining since 2014.

    Sale of yogurt was down 3.4 percent over the 12 months ending in February 2019. The decline of Greek-style yogurt has allowed Icelandic style yogurt to gain a foothold in the United States with sales of the Icelandic style yogurt increasing 24 percent in 2018 to $173 million.[32]

    Nutrition

    Yogurt (plain yogurt from whole milk) is 81% water, 9% protein, 5% fat, and 4% carbohydrates, including 4% sugars (table). A 100-gram amount provides 406 kilojoules (97 kcal) of dietary energy. As a proportion of the Daily Value (DV), a serving of yogurt is a rich source of vitamin B12 (31% DV) and riboflavin (23% DV), with moderate content of protein, phosphorus, and selenium (14 to 19% DV; table).

    Tilde (~) represents missing or incomplete data. The above shows little difference exists between whole milk and yogurt made from whole milk with respect to the listed nutritional constituents.

    Because it may contain live cultures, yogurt is often associated with probiotics, which have been postulated as having positive effects on immune, cardiovascular or metabolic health.[35][36][37] However, to date high-quality clinical evidence has been insufficient to conclude that consuming yogurt lowers the risk of diseases or otherwise improves health.[38][needs update]

    Health and safety

    Yogurt made with raw milk can be contaminated with bacteria that can cause significant illness and death, including Listeria, Cryptosporidium, Campylobacter, Brucella, E.Coli and Salmonella.[39] Yogurts can also be contaminated with Aflatoxin producing Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus parasiticus and Aspergillus nomius.[40]

    Contamination occurs in traditionally prepared yogurts more often than industrially processed ones, but may affect the latter as well if manufacturing and packaging practices are suboptimal.[40]

    When mold forms on yogurt it can not be scraped away. The consistency of yogurt allows the mold to penetrate deeply under the surface where it spreads.[41]

    Varieties and presentation

    Tzatzikior cacıkis a mezemade with yogurt, cucumber, olive oil and fresh mint or dill

    Dahi is a yogurt from the Indian subcontinent, known for its characteristic taste and consistency. The word dahi seems to be derived from the Sanskrit word dadhi ("sour milk"), one of the five elixirs, or panchamrita, often used in Hindu ritual. Sweetened dahi (mishti doi or meethi dahi) is common in eastern parts of India, made by fermenting sweetened milk. While cow's milk is currently the primary ingredient for yogurt, goat and buffalo milk were widely used in the past, and valued for the fat content (see buffalo curd).

    Dadiah or dadih is a traditional West Sumatran yogurt made from water buffalo milk, fermented in bamboo tubes.[42] Yogurt is common in Nepal, where it is served as both an appetizer and dessert. Locally called dahi, it is a part of the Nepali culture, used in local festivals, marriage ceremonies, parties, religious occasions, family gatherings, and so on. One Nepalese yogurt is called juju dhau, originating from the city of Bhaktapur. In Tibet, yak milk (technically dri milk, as the word yak refers to the male animal) is made into yogurt (and butter and cheese) and consumed.

    In Northern Iran, Mâst Chekide is a variety of kefir yogurt with a distinct sour taste. It is usually mixed with a pesto-like water and fresh herb purée called delal. Common appetizers are spinach or eggplantborani, Mâst-o-Khiâr with cucumber, spring onions and herbs, and Mâst-Musir with wild shallots. In the summertime, yogurt and ice cubes are mixed together with cucumbers, raisins, salt, pepper and onions and topped with some croutons made of Persian traditional bread and served as a cold soup. Ashe-Mâst is a warm yogurt soup with fresh herbs, spinach and lentils. Even the leftover water extracted when straining yogurt is cooked to make a sour cream sauce called kashk, which is usually used as a topping on soups and stews.

    Matsoni is a Georgian yogurt in the Caucasus and Russia. Tarator and Cacık are cold soups made from yogurt during summertime in eastern Europe. They are made with ayran, cucumbers, dill, salt, olive oil, and optionally garlic and ground walnuts. Tzatziki in Greece and milk salad in Bulgaria are thick yogurt-based salads similar to tarator.

    Khyar w Laban (cucumber and yogurt salad) is a dish in Lebanon and Syria. Also, a wide variety of local Lebanese and Syrian dishes are cooked with yogurt like "Kibbi bi Laban" Rahmjoghurt, a creamy yogurt with much higher fat content (10%) than many yogurts offered in English-speaking countries. Dovga, a yogurt soup cooked with a variety of herbs and rice, is served warm in winter or refreshingly cold in summer. Jameed, yogurt salted and dried to preserve it, is consumed in Jordan. Zabadi is the type of yogurt made in Egypt, usually from the milk of the Egyptian water buffalo. It is particularly associated with Ramadan fasting, as it is thought to prevent thirst during all-day fasting.[43]

    Sweetened and flavored

    To offset its natural sourness, yogurt is also sold sweetened, sweetened and flavored or in containers with fruit or fruit jam on the bottom.[44] The two styles of yogurt commonly found in the grocery store are set-style yogurt and Swiss-style yogurt. Set-style yogurt is poured into individual containers to set, while Swiss-style yogurt is stirred prior to packaging. Either may have fruit added to increase sweetness.[44]

    Lassi is a common Indian beverage made from stirred liquified yogurt that is either salted or sweetened with sugar commonly, less commonly honey and combined with fruit pulp to create flavored lassi.[45] Consistency can vary widely, with urban and commercial lassis having uniform texture through being processed, whereas rural and rustic lassi has discernible curds or fruit pulp.[45]

    Large amounts of sugar – or other sweeteners for low-energy yogurts – are often used in commercial yogurt.[44][46] Some yogurts contain added modified starch,[47]pectin (found naturally in fruit) or gelatin to create thickness and creaminess. This type of yogurt may be marketed under the name Swiss-style, although it is unrelated to conventional Swiss yogurt. Some yogurts, often called "cream line", are made with whole milk which has not been homogenized so the cream rises to the top. In many countries, sweetened, flavored yogurt is common, typically sold in single-servingplastic cups.[44] Common flavors may include vanilla, honey, and toffee, and various fruits.[44][46] In the early 21st century, yogurt flavors inspired by desserts, such as chocolate or cheesecake, became common.[46] There is concern about the health effects of sweetened yogurt due to its high sugar content,[44] although research indicates that use of sugar in yogurt manufacturing has decreased since 2016 in response to WHO and government initiatives to combat obesity.[44][48]

    Straining

    Main article: Strained yogurt

    A coffee filter used to strain yogurt in a home refrigerator.

    Strained yogurt has been strained through a filter, traditionally made of muslin and more recently of paper or non-muslin cloth. This removes the whey, giving a much thicker consistency. Strained yogurt is made at home, especially if using skimmed milk which results in a thinner consistency.[49] Yogurt that has been strained to filter or remove the whey is known as Labneh in Middle Eastern countries. It has a consistency between that of yogurt and cheese. It may be used for sandwiches in Middle Eastern countries. Olive oil, cucumber slices, olives, and various green herbs may be added. It can be thickened further and rolled into balls, preserved in olive oil, and fermented for a few more weeks. It is sometimes used with onions, meat, and nuts as a stuffing for a variety of pies or kibbeh balls.

    Some types of strained yogurts are boiled in open vats first, so that the liquid content is reduced. The East Indian dessert, a variation of traditional dahi called mishti dahi, offers a thicker, more custard-like consistency, and is usually sweeter than western yogurts.[50] In western Indian (Marathi and Gujarati) cuisine, strained yogurt is macerated with sugar and spices such as saffron, cardamom and nutmeg to make the dessert "shrikhand". Strained yogurt is also enjoyed in Greece and is the main component of tzatziki (from Turkish "cacık"), a well-known accompaniment to gyros and souvlaki pita sandwiches: it is a yogurt sauce or dip made with the addition of grated cucumber, olive oil, salt and, optionally, mashed garlic. Srikhand, a dessert in India, wells fargo bank west 103rd street leawood ks made from strained yogurt, saffron, is live culture yogurt good for you, nutmeg and sugar and sometimes fruits such as mango or pineapple.

    In North America, strained yogurt is commonly called "Greek yogurt". Powdered milk is sometimes added in lieu of straining to achieve thickness. In Britain as "Greek-style yogurt". In Britain the name "Greek" may only be applied to yogurt made in Greece.[51]

    Beverages

    Ayran, doogh ("dawghe" in Neo-Aramaic) or dhallë is a yogurt-based, salty drink. It is made by mixing yogurt with water and (sometimes) salt.

    Borhani (or burhani) is a spicy yogurt drink from Bangladesh. It is usually served with kacchi biryani at weddings and special feasts. Key ingredients are yogurt blended with mint leaves (mentha), is live culture yogurt good for you seeds and black rock salt (Kala Namak). Ground roasted cumin, ground white pepper, green chili pepper paste and sugar are often added.

    Lassi is a yogurt-based beverage that is usually slightly salty or sweet, and may be commercially flavored with rosewater, mango or other fruit juice. Salty lassi is usually flavored with ground, roasted cumin and red chilies, may be made with buttermilk.

    An unsweetened and unsalted yogurt drink usually called simply jogurt is consumed with burek and other baked goods in the Balkans. Sweetened chase meridian bank drinks are the usual form in Europe (including the UK) and the US, containing fruit and added sweeteners. These are typically called "drinkable yogurt". Also available are "yogurt smoothies", which contain a higher proportion of fruit and are more like smoothies.

    Plant-based yogurt

    A variety of plant milk yogurts appeared in the 2000s, using soy milk, rice milk, and nut milks such as almond milk and coconut milk fermented with cultures. These yogurts may be suitable for people with lactose intolerance or those who prefer plant-based foods such as vegetarians or vegans.[52]Plant-based milks have different structures and components than dairy milk. Though they can be used to make many products similar to those made from dairy, there are differences in taste and texture. For example, "soy, almond, [and] coconut yogurts do not have the same delicate and smooth structure that conventional yogurts have."[53] Since plant-based milks do not contain lactose (the food of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus), plant-based yogurts usually contain different bacterial strains than a dairy yogurt, such as Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and Bifidobacterium bifidum.[54] Plant-based yogurts also vary considerably in their nutrition and ingredients, and may contain gums, stabilizers, high-intensity sweeteners, and artificial colors.[54]

    In Europe, companies may central trust bank near me market their plant-based products using the word "yogurt" since that term is reserved for products of animal origin only — per European Union regulation 1308/2013 and a 2017 ruling in the Court of Justice of the European Union.[55][56]

    Production

    Commercially available home yogurt maker

    Yogurt is made by heating milk to a temperature that denaturates its proteins (scalding), essential for making yogurt,[57] cooling it to a temperature that will not kill the live microorganisms that turn the milk into yogurt, inoculating certain bacteria (starter culture), usually Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus, into the milk, and finally keeping it warm for several hours. The milk may be held at 85 °C (185 °F) for a few minutes, or boiled (giving a somewhat different result). It must be cooled to 50 °C (122 °F) or somewhat less, typically 40–46 °C (104–115 °F). Starter culture must then be mixed in well, and the mixture must be kept undisturbed and warm for some time, anywhere between 5 and 12 hours. Longer fermentation times produces a more acidic yogurt. The starter culture may be a small amount of live (not sterilized) existing yogurt or commercially available dried starter culture.

    Milk with a higher concentration of solids than normal milk may be used; the higher solids content produces a firmer yogurt. Solids can be increased by adding dried milk.[58] The yogurt-making process provides two significant barriers to pathogen growth, heat and acidity (low pH). Both are necessary to ensure a safe product. Acidity alone has been questioned by recent outbreaks of food poisoning by E. coli O157:H7 that is acid-tolerant. E. coli O157:H7 is easily destroyed by pasteurization (heating); the initial heating of the milk kills pathogens as well as denaturing proteins.[59] The microorganisms that turn milk into yogurt can tolerate higher temperatures than most pathogens, so that a suitable temperature not only encourages the formation of yogurt, but inhibits pathogenic microorganisms. Once the yogurt has formed it can, if desired, be strained to reduce the whey content and thicken it.

    Commercial yogurt

    Two types of yogurt are supported by the Codex Alimentarius for import and export.[60]

    • Pasteurized yogurt ("heat commercial drive real estate listings fermented milk")[60] is yogurt pasteurized to kill bacteria.[61]
    • Probiotic yogurt (labeled as "live yogurt" or "active yogurt") is yogurt pasteurized to kill bacteria, with Lactobacillus added in measured units before packaging.[dubious – discuss]
    • Yogurt probiotic drink is a drinkable yogurt pasteurized to kill bacteria, with Lactobacillus added is live culture yogurt good for you packaging.

    Under US Food and Drug Administration regulations, milk must be pasteurized before it is cultured, and may optionally be heat treated after culturing to increase shelf life.[62] Most commercial yogurts in the United States are not heat treated after culturing, and contain live cultures.

    Yogurt with live cultures[63][64][65] is more beneficial than pasteurized yogurt for people with lactose malabsorption.[66]

    Lactose intolerance

    Lactose intolerance is a condition in which people have symptoms due to the decreased ability to digest lactose, a sugar found in dairy products. In 2010, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) determined that lactose intolerance can be alleviated by ingesting live yogurt cultures (lactobacilli) that are able to digest the lactose in other dairy products.[66] The scientific review by EFSA enabled yogurt manufacturers to use a health claim on product labels, provided that the "yogurt should contain at least 108 CFU live starter microorganisms (Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus) per gram. The target population is individuals with lactose maldigestion."[66]

    Gallery

    • Doogh is a savory yogurt-based beverage, traditionally served cold and is sometimes carbonated and seasoned with mint and salt.

    • Skyr is an Icelandic cultured dairy product, similar to strained yogurt traditionally served cold with milk and a topping of sugar

    See also

    References

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    3. ^Lee YK, et al. (2012). "Probiotic Regulation in Asian Countries". In Lahtinen S, et al. (eds.). Lactic Acid Bacteria: Microbiological and Functional Aspects (Fourth ed.). Boca Raton: CRC Press. p. 712. ISBN .
    4. ^Chandan RC, Kilara A (22 December 2010). Dairy Ingredients for Food Processing. John Wiley & Sons. pp. 1–. ISBN .
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    External links

    • The dictionary definition of yogurt at Wiktionary
    Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yogurt

    7 Impressive Health Benefits of Yogurt

    Yogurt has been consumed by humans for hundreds of years.

    It’s very nutritious, and eating it regularly may boost several aspects is live culture yogurt good for you your health.

    For example, yogurt has been found to reduce the risk of heart disease and osteoporosis, as well as aid in weight management.

    This article explores 7 science-supported health benefits of yogurt.

    What Is Yogurt best mortgage refinance rates in texas How Is It Made?

    Yogurt is a popular dairy product that’s made by the bacterial fermentation of milk.

    The bacteria used to make yogurt are called “yogurt cultures,” which ferment lactose, the natural sugar found in milk.

    This process produces lactic acid, a substance that causes milk proteins to curdle, giving yogurt its unique flavor and texture.

    Yogurt can be made from all types of milk. Varieties made from skim milk are considered fat-free, whereas those made from whole milk are considered full-fat.

    Plain yogurt without added colorants is a white, thick liquid with a tangy flavor.

    Unfortunately, most commercial brands contain added ingredients, such as sugar and artificial flavors. These yogurts are not good for your health.

    On the other hand, plain, unsweetened yogurt offers many health benefits.

    So without further ado, here are 7 science-based health benefits of natural yogurt.

    1. It’s Rich in Important Nutrients

    Yogurt contains some of nearly every nutrient that your body needs.

    It’s known for containing a lot of calcium, a mineral necessary for healthy teeth and bones. Just one cup provides 49% of your daily calcium needs (, 2).

    It is also high in B vitamins, particularly vitamin B12 and riboflavin, both of which may protect against heart disease and certain neural tube birth defects (2,).

    One cup also provides 38% of your daily need for phosphorus, 12% for magnesium and 18% for potassium. These minerals are essential for several biological processes, such as regulating blood pressure, metabolism and bone health (2, ).

    One nutrient that yogurt does not contain naturally is vitamin D, but it is commonly fortified with it. Vitamin D promotes bone and immune system health and may reduce the risk of some diseases, including heart disease and depression (,).

    Summary:

    Yogurt provides almost every nutrient that your body needs. It is especially high in calcium, B vitamins and trace minerals.

    2. It’s High in Protein

    Yogurt provides an impressive amount of protein, with about 12 grams per 7 ounces (200 grams) (2).

    Protein has been shown to support metabolism by increasing your energy expenditure, or the number of calories that you burn throughout the day ().

    Saturated fat was previously believed to cause heart disease, but current research shows that this isn’t the case. Nevertheless, fat-free and low-fat varieties of yogurt are still popular in the US (,).

    Protein has been shown to support metabolism by increasing your energy expenditure, or the number of calories that you burn throughout the day ().

    Getting enough protein is also important for appetite regulation, as it increases the production of hormones that signal fullness. It may automatically reduce the number of calories you consume overall, which is beneficial for weight control (,).

    In solana town center study, subjects who snacked on yogurt were less hungry and consumed 100 fewer calories at dinner, compared to those who ate lower-protein snacks with the same amount of calories ().

    Yogurt’s fullness-promoting effects are even more prominent if you eat Greek yogurt, which is a very thick variety that has been strained. It is higher in protein than regular yogurt, providing 22 grams per 7 ounces (200 grams) (15).

    Greek yogurt has been shown to influence appetite control and delay feelings of hunger more than regular yogurt with less protein ().

    Summary:

    Yogurt, especially the Greek variety, is very high in protein. Protein is helpful for appetite and weight control.

    3. Some Varieties May Benefit Digestive Health

    Some types of yogurt contain live bacteria, or probiotics, that were either a part of the starter culture or added after pasteurization.

    These may benefit digestive health when consumed ().

    Unfortunately, many yogurts have been pasteurized, which is a heat treatment that kills the beneficial bacteria they contain.

    To ensure your yogurt contains effective probiotics, look for one that contains live, active cultures, which should be listed on the label.

    Some types of probiotics found in yogurt, such as Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus, have been shown to lessen the uncomfortable symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which is a common chase bank on lawrence in chicago that affects the colon (, ).

    One study had IBS patients regularly consume fermented milk or yogurt that contained Bifidobacteria. After only three weeks, they reported improvements in bloating and stool frequency — effects seen after six weeks, as well ().

    Another study found that yogurt with Bifidobacteria improved digestive symptoms and health-related quality of life among women who did not have a diagnosed digestive condition ().

    Furthermore, several studies have found that probiotics may protect against antibiotic-associated diarrhea, as well as constipation (,, ).

    Summary:

    Some types of yogurt contain probiotics, which may boost digestive health by reducing the symptoms of common gastrointestinal disorders, such as bloating, diarrhea and constipation.

    4. It May Strengthen Your Immune System

    Consuming yogurt — especially if it contains probiotics — on a regular basis may strengthen your immune system and reduce your likelihood of contracting an illness.

    Probiotics have been shown to reduce inflammation, which is linked to several health conditions ranging from viral infections to gut disorders (, ).

    Research shows that in some instances, probiotics may also help reduce the incidence, duration and severity of the common cold (,).

    Moreover, the immune-enhancing properties of yogurt are partly due to its magnesium, selenium and zinc, which are trace minerals known for the role they play in immune system health (,).

    Vitamin D-fortified yogurts may boost immune health even further. Vitamin D has been studied for its potential to prevent illnesses such as the common cold and flu (, ).

    Summary:

    Yogurt provides probiotics, vitamins and minerals, all of which may boost immune health and prevent certain illnesses.

    5. It May Protect Against Osteoporosis

    Yogurt contains some key nutrients for maintaining bone health, including calcium, protein, potassium, phosphorus and, sometimes, vitamin D.

    All of these vitamins and minerals are especially helpful for preventing osteoporosis, a condition characterized by weakening of the bones. It is common in the elderly (,).

    Individuals with osteoporosis have low bone density and are at a higher risk of bone fractures (, ).

    However, research shows that consuming at least three servings of dairy foods, such as yogurt, on a daily basis may help preserve bone mass and strength (, ).

    Summary:

    Yogurt is rich in vitamins and minerals that play a key role in bone health. Consuming it regularly may reduce the risk of osteoporosis.

    6. It May Benefit Heart Health

    Yogurt’s fat content is one of the reasons why its healthiness is often controversial. It contains mostly saturated fat, with a small amount of monounsaturated fatty acids.

    Saturated fatwas previously believed to cause heart disease, but current research shows that this isn’t the case. Nevertheless, fat-free and low-fat varieties of yogurt are still popular in the US (,).

    There is no clear evidence that the fat in yogurt is harmful to your health. In fact, it may benefit heart health (, ).

    Some research shows that the intake of saturated fat from whole-milk products increases “good” HDL cholesterol, which may protect heart health. Other studies have found yogurt intake to reduce the overall incidence of heart disease (,).

    Furthermore, dairy products like yogurt have been shown to help reduce high blood pressure, which is a major risk factor for heart disease. The effects seem to be most prominent in those already diagnosed with high blood pressure (,).

    Summary:

    Regardless of its fat content, yogurt appears to benefit heart health by increasing “good” HDL cholesterol and reducing blood pressure.

    7. It May Promote Weight Management

    Yogurt has several properties that may help with weight management.

    For starters, it is high in protein, which works along with calcium to increase levels of appetite-reducing hormones like peptide YY and GLP-1 ().

    Furthermore, several studies have found that yogurt consumption is associated with lower body weight, body fat percentage and waist circumference ().

    One review found that the intake of full-fat dairy products, including yogurt, may reduce the incidence of obesity. This is contrary to what was previously believed about fat intake and weight gain (63).

    Other studies have found that those who eat yogurt tend to eat better overall, compared to those who do not eat it. This is partly due to its higher nutrient content, compared to its fairly low calorie content (, ).

    Summary:

    Yogurt is high in protein, which is very filling, and may improve your diet overall. Both of these aspects help with weight management.

    Yogurt May Not Be for Everyone

    Some people need to be cautious with their yogurt intake, as it may cause adverse effects, especially in those with lactose intolerance or a milk allergy.

    Lactose Intolerance

    Lactose intolerance occurs when the body lacks lactase, the enzyme needed to break down lactose, which is the sugar found in milk. It leads to various digestive symptoms, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, after consuming milk products.

    Therefore, those with lactose intolerance may need to avoid yogurt.

    However, some people who are lactose intolerant may be able to tolerate it. This is because some of the lactose is broken down during production, and probiotics may assist with its digestion ().

    If you are lactose intolerant, it may be a matter of trial and error to determine if eating yogurt works for you.

    Milk Allergy

    Milk products contain casein and whey, which are proteins that some people are allergic to. In these cases, milk triggers a reaction that can range from hives and swelling to life-threatening anaphylaxis.

    For this reason, it’s best to avoid yogurt if you have a milk allergy.

    Added Sugar

    Many types of yogurt contain high amounts added sugar, especially those labeled as low in fat. Excess sugar intake is associated with several health problems, including diabetes and obesity (,).

    Therefore, it’s important to read food labels and avoid brands that list sugar in the ingredients.

    Summary:

    Yogurt may have adverse effects for those with lactose intolerance or milk allergies. Many types also contain high amounts of added sugar, which may contribute to certain health conditions.

    How to Choose the Best Yogurt for Your Health

    Less is more when it comes to choosing a healthy yogurt.

    Plain, unsweetened varieties are best, since they contain minimal ingredients without any added sugar.

    Whether you choose low- or full-fat yogurt is a personal choice.

    Full-fat varieties contain more calories, but that doesn’t mean that they’re unhealthy. Just make sure to stick with the recommended portion size.

    You should also look for yogurts that midland states bank routing number rockford il live and active cultures to ensure you get your fix of health-promoting probiotics.

    Summary:

    The best yogurts for your health contain few ingredients and no added sugar. Aim for a brand that contains probiotics.

    The Bottom Line

    Yogurt is rich in nutrients and may boost your health when consumed regularly.

    It may help reduce the risk of some diseases, while also benefiting digestive health and weight control.

    However, make sure to choose your yogurt wisely. For maximal health benefits, choose plain, unsweetened varieties that contain probiotics.

    Источник: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/7-benefits-of-yogurt

    Yogurt vs. Probiotic Supplements: Which is More Effective?

    Your digestive tract is home to a population of microorganisms numbering in the trillions. The good bacterial strains that live in your gut—also known as your gut microbiome—play a key role in the proper functioning of everything from your immune system to your metabolism. Supporting your gut microbiome by introducing good bacteria into your digestive system is one of the best ways to support your body's overall health.

    Probiotics are beneficial bacterial strains which can be found in a number of sources -  but two, in particular, stand out thanks to their popularity: yogurt and probiotic supplements. Both help to augment your body's existing healthy bacteria population, and adding either to your daily routine is better than nothing. Head-to-head, however, which is more effective when it comes to introducing a broad range of probiotics to your body?

    In short: probiotic supplements are more effective than yogurt at providing the optimal numbers and variety of probiotics—and here's why:

    Why Yogurt Falls Short

    While yogurt may help provide some level of digestive support and can be a delicious addition to any diet, it simply can't compete with the best probiotic supplements for women, men, and children. There are a number of factors that cause this dairy product to come up short in delivering both high numbers of probiotics and the right probiotic strains to benefit your digestive tract.

    For starters, only a few types of probiotics naturally occur in yogurt. These strains—Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, and Streptococcus Thermophilus—do provide certain health benefits, of course. However, with more than 500 different strains of probiotics in existence, your daily probiotic yogurt will fall far short of providing you with the best overall diversity of potentially-beneficial bugs.

    Even though the strains of naturally-occurring probiotics in yogurt are beneficial, your yogurt may simply not have enough of it to be helpful. In order to receive the full benefit of probiotic potency, you’d need to eat more than a dozen yogurts to match the potency of an adult dose of LoveBug probiotics. In reviewing the current body of scientific research on the subject, one group of researchers at the University of Toronto found that many of the studies that touted yogurt's benefits were funded by the food industry itself and utilized probiotic doses that were as much as 25 times the amount actually in yogurt.

    That's another key drawback of relying on yogurt as a probiotic source: the massive amounts of added sugar. Many studies have been conducted to investigate the effects of yogurt consumption directly on conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). What isn't necessarily apparent from the often-positive results of these studies, however, is that participants needed to eat yogurt two or three times every day in order to see any positive probiotic benefits, but the sugar consumption of that yogurt bender would only feed the bad bacteria in your gut - and who really wants to consume that much yogurt, anyway?

    Probiotics and Yogurt

    Finally, while some yogurts are probiotic-rich, many yogurts on the market have no active probiotic strains at all. Many of the pasteurization and sterilization processes that commercially-available yogurt is subjected to kills all the live microorganisms that otherwise naturally occur in yogurt. Even when yogurt does have live probiotics, the particular type of starter culture used to produce the yogurt can have a huge effect on how many active probiotic strains survive until you take that first bite. A study conducted by researchers at California Polytechnic State University found that the number of viable probiotic strains in different yogurts can be reduced exponentially if certain starter cultures are used.

    In other words, you shouldn't assume that the yogurt you're eating has probiotics. Some yogurt brands (voluntarily) label their yogurts with the National Yogurt Association's "Live and Active Cultures" seal, which indicates that the yogurt has a minimum level of live lactic acid bacteria—but this seal isn't required to be used, and even when it is, the numbers and variety of probiotics in the yogurt can still be insufficient to confer all the potential health benefits.

    And as we’ve already mentioned, many yogurts have high amounts of high fructose corn syrup, processed sugar, and other less-than-healthy ingredients that can mess with your gut. So it becomes clear: eat yogurt as a treat but take a probiotic supplement for your populating the beneficial bacteria in your gut.

    More Potent Probiotic Foods

    Kefir, another fermented milk product, has many important nutrients and far more probiotic cultures compared to yogurt to help aid and balance your gut bacteria. Kefir has 30 types of probiotic yeasts and beneficial bacteria—that's approximately three times the number of probiotic cultures compared to yogurt! It also a great source of protein, great western popcorn supplies, and potassium and is effective in reducing a whole host of digestive issues, lowering blood pressure and cholesterol, and even seen to be helpful in treating UTIs and vaginal infections.

    Another probiotic food you may want to give a try is buttermilk. Aside from being a great source of probiotics, buttermilk also has essential nutrients such as vitamins, enzymes, carbohydrates, and proteins. Because it is so high in water content, it also helps keep you stay hydrated and improve digestion. Check out our post, What Do Probiotics and Water Have in Common, if you are interested in more about that.

    What to Look For in Your Probiotic Supplement

    While taking a probiotic supplement can be more effective than yogurt at introducing all that beneficial bacteria into your digestive system, keep in mind that not all supplements are created equal. Your probiotic supplement can beat yogurt's probiotic benefits if you pick one that displays certain key characteristics.

    The number of live bacterial strains in the supplement is obviously a key factor in its efficacy. Is live culture yogurt good for you bare minimum amount of bacteria needed to be considered effective is 1 billion colony forming units (also known as CFUs) per day. If the supplement you're considering doesn't list the number of CFUs it has, there's reason for concern: testing company ConsumerLab.com found that many of the probiotic supplements they tested that did not specify their CFUs with live bacteria numbering in just the thousands, which is far too little be effective.

    The specific types of bacteria in the supplement is also important, as different strains can help with different health concerns. For example, Lactobacillus acidophilus has been shown to reduce cholesterol, while Lactobacillus plantarum has proven effective in reducing the symptoms of kee mao noodles bowel syndrome. Other strains have been shown to improve immune function, reduce inflammation, combat the effects of diarrhea, and more. Finding a supplement that has the right diversity of strains to address your particular health issues is key to getting the biggest benefit from your probiotic.

    The delivery system that a probiotic supplement uses is equally important as the number and variety of live cultures the supplement has. Why? It's simple: while many supplements cite the number of organisms they have at the point when they were manufactured, this number is meaningless if the supplement's delivery system doesn't protect the strains from the harsh and acidic environment of your stomach. Without a proper delivery system, many types of probiotic bacteria are killed off by the stomach acids before they can reach your intestinal tract and start to colonize your gut. This is why the number of viable microorganisms that your supplement can introduce to your gut microbiome is the key number to consider.

    LoveBug Probiotics have 15 times more survivability than standard capsules thanks to our apple store gift card retailers, scientifically proven delivery technology, BIO-tract®. That means our probiotic supplements are uniquely equipped to support gut health to the fullest extent and provide numerous other health benefits.

    What Makes Our Probiotic Supplements Different?

    For many people, other factors can be a consideration when choosing a probiotic that may not directly influence the supplement's effectiveness but can increase the likelihood that they'll be able to maintain it as part of their daily routine.

    The presence of unnecessary additives is increasingly concerning to many American consumers. We’re picky here at LoveBug - because we’re passionate moms. Similarly, we invite you to take a look to see if the probiotic supplement you're considering has ingredients such as gluten, soy, sugar, nuts, dairy or GMO’s. LoveBug probiotics are free of all these additives, allergens, and unwanted ingredients.

    Lastly, some probiotic supplements must be refrigerated to keep their strains alive, but ours are shelf-stable at room temperature. If you can't reliably keep charter communications bill pay address probiotic refrigerated until you is live culture yogurt good for you it, question the efficacy. LoveBug probiotics do not need to be refrigerated due to our BIO-tract® technology.

    Remember: your probiotic supplement is more effective than a cup of yogurt, but only if you take it on a daily basis.

    The benefits of probiotics are both cumulative and vast. At LoveBug, we've created specific probiotics for the whole family. We’ve created probiotics for all ages and stages - because we want you to feel good from the inside out!

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    Feel the LoveBug Difference

    Protect and nurture the health of your whole family with LoveBug Probiotics.

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    References

    Chiang BL, Sheih YH, Wang LH, Liao CK, Gill HS (2000). Enhancing immunity by dietary consumption of a probiotic lactic acid bacterium (Bifidobacterium lactis HN019): optimization and definition of cellular immune responses. Eur J Clin Nutr 54, 849–855.

    Hungin APS, Chang L, Locke GR et al. Irritable bowel Syndrome in the United States: Prevalence, symptoms patterns and impact. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2005;21:1365–1375.

    Scourboutakos, M.J.; Franco-Arellano, B.; Murphy, S.A.; Norsen, S.; Comelli, E.M.; L’Abbé, M.R. Mismatch between Probiotic Benefits in Trials versus Food Products. Nutrients 2017, 9, 400.

    Источник: https://lovebugprobiotics.com/blogs/news/yogurt-vs-probiotic-supplements-which-is-more-effective

    There’s no denying that probiotics are ~buzzy~ in the food world right now. And for good reason: They support digestion, keep you regular, boost your immune system, and promote overall health.

    And while there are so many probiotics to choose from these days (kimchi! kombucha! sauerkraut! tempeh! miso!), don't forget about good ol' yogurt. "I’m all about the kombucha-on-tap life, but yogurt still holds a special place in my heart," says nutritionist Kelli McGrane, RD.

    To reap the most gut-healing benefits from your yogurt, be sure to check the label for the term “live active cultures,” and, particularly, a type of probiotic called lactobacillus is live culture yogurt good for you, says Juliana Dewsnap, RD, nutritionist for Baze. (Most product labels will call it out.)

    This especially trendy probiotic is known for supporting overall digestion, promoting healthy blood sugar, and even northern bank and trust melrose your body avoid yeast infections, says Dewsnap. Bonus: Since L. acidophilus also produces the enzyme lactase, yogurts containing it may be easier for people with dairy issues to digest (think of it as nature’s Lactaid pill!). What’s more is that studies suggest it may also reduce symptoms associated with irritable bowel syndrome, like pain aye myat thu new photo 2016 bloating, and reduce the itchiness and pain associated with eczema. Color me impressed.

    This content is imported from {embed-name}. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

    And, no, you don’t need to scarf down your yogurt plain to reap these benefits, either. With a little creativity, you can turn yogurt into a full-blown meal. (Trust me, you need yogurt topped with spicy chickpeas and lime in your life, stat).

    Ready to treat your tummy and taste buds? Here are the best probiotic yogurts on the market, according to nutritionists


    Vanilla Whole-Milk Yogurt

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    1. Siggi’s Icelandic Skyr

    "Siggi's, an Icelandic style of yogurt called skyr, is creamier and thicker than Greek yogurt," says dietitian Leigh Tracy, RD. "It's also low in added sugar and contains live active bacteria to help promote gut health."

    Per serving: 130 calories, 4.5 g fat (3 g sat), 11 g carbs, 60 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 8 g sugar, 12 g protein


    Strawberry Yogurt

    Yoplaittarget.com

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    2. Yoplait Light

    Dewsnap loves Yoplait Light's tasty flavors, especially the strawberry. Since they're plenty sweet, just go easy on sweet toppings like fruit.

    Per serving: 90 calories, 0 g fat (0 g sat), 16 g carbs, 105 mg sodium, 10 g sugar, 5 g protein


    2% Milkfat Plain Greek Yogurt

    Fagetarget.com

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    3. Fage Total

    "Greek yogurt contains more protein than regular yogurt and has a thicker texture," says Rooms to go credit card apply. Fage Total Greek Yogurt is a great swap-in for sour cream and works wonders in smoothies.

    Per serving: 150 calories, 4 g fat (3 g sat), 8 g carbs, 65 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 8 g sugar, 20 g protein


    Plain Whole Milk Yogurt

    Stonyfieldtarget.com

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    4. Stonyfield Farm Organic

    "Both [Stonyfield's] regular and Greek yogurts are non-GMO, free of growth hormones, and contain excellent sources of live active cultures," says McGrane. They also offer soy yogurt, which is a good source of probiotics for dairy-free eaters.

    Per serving: 170 calories, 9 g fat (5 g sat), 13 g carbs, 125 mg sodium, 0g fiber, 12 g sugar, 9 g protein


    Plain Cream Top Whole Milk Yogurt

    Brown Cowsafeway.com

    $4.99

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    5. Brown Cow

    "Traditional, unstrained yogurt tends to get overshadowed by Greek yogurt, but it can be just as healthy," says McGrane. Brown Cow's yogurt may have less protein, but it still provides those essential probiotics, including L. acidophilus.

    Per qdoba mukwonago 130 calories, 7 g fat (4.5 g sat), 9 g carbs, 95 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 9 g sugar, 6 g protein


    Non-Fat Plain Greek Yogurt

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    6. Chobani

    This simple yogurt is live culture yogurt good for you low in sugar, so you can add plenty of your own toppings, like fruit, nuts, and seeds, says Dewsnap. Plus, its 14 grams of protein help keep you satiated for way longer.

    Per serving: 80 calories, 0 g fat (o g sat), 6 g carbs, 55 mg sodium, 4 g sugar, 14 g protein


    Probiotic Plain Lowfat Yogurt

    Nancy'sinstacart.com

    $32.00

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    7. Nancy's Organic

    Dewsnap loves Nancy's Organic yogurts because they're rich in probiotics and delicious flavor. You can get them in bigger bulk servings to keep on hand throughout the week, too. Since their plain version is a little higher in sugar, top it with some fats and proteins for balance.

    Per serving: 140 calories, 3 g fat (2 g sat), 160 mg sodium, 16 g carbs, 16 g sugar, 11 g protein


    Plain 100% Grass-Fed Whole Milk Cream On Top Yogurt

    Maple Hill Creamerywegmans.com

    $5.49

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    8. Maple Hill Creamery

    Made with whole milk, this pick is creamy, rich, and super satiating, says Dewsnap. Since it's higher in sugar than protein, be sure to top it with additional protein, like hemp hearts.

    Per serving: 170 calories, 10 g fat (7 g sat), 110 mg sodium, 11 g carbs, 0 g fiber, 11 g sugar, 8 g protein


    Plain Aussie Greek Style Whole Milk Yogurt

    Wallaby Organic instacart.com

    $7.99

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    9. Wallaby Organic

    "Australian yogurt is perfect for those who want a texture somewhere between traditional and Greek yogurt," says McGrane, who recommends Wallaby for its taste and probiotic content.

    Per serving: 220 calories, 11 g fat (7 g sat), 90 mg sodium, 10 g carbs, 0 g fiber, 7 g sugar, 21 g protein


    Lemon Australian-Style Yoghurt

    target.com

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    10. Noosa

    Another Australian yogurt pick from McGrane, Noosa has a nice texture and a solid dose of fats and gut-regulating bacteria. Since the flavored varieties are high in sugar, enjoy them as an occasional treat. Otherwise, stick with plain.

    Per serving: 320 calories, 13 g fat (8 g sat), 110mg sodium, 39 g carbs, 0g fiber, 35 g sugar, 12 g protein

    Isadora BaumIsadora Baum is a freelance writer, certified health coach, and author of 5-Minute Energy.

    Marissa MillerMarissa Miller has spent a decade editing and reporting on women’s health issues from an intersectional lens with a focus on peer-reviewed nutrition, fitness trends, mental health, skincare, reproductive rights and beyond, and currently holds a certificate in plant-based nutrition from Cornell.

    This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

    Источник: https://www.womenshealthmag.com/food/a19891629/best-probiotic-yogurts/

    What is Live Culture Yogurt? 

    Yogurt is a food product that’s widely consumed all over the world that’s produced by fermenting the milk using bacteria. Yogurt has been an appealing food for people of all ages. It is not only a delicacy but also contains various potential health benefits due to the live and active cultures it possesses.

    Gyros Salad

    However, with more and more technological advancement in the food industry, the authenticity of yogurt, which is mainly defined by the live and active cultures it contains, is being brought down gradually. 

    To give an overview, the bacteria that are used to ferment the yogurt are known as yogurt culture. These are important for multiple health benefits. These bacteria are the ones that lend the final product the texture and thickness it carries.

    A lot of factors determine how the yogurt will turn out, and these factors are primarily meant to save the live cultures, i.e, bacteria in the yogurt. For instance, it’s critical to maintain just the right temperature since the change in temperature beyond what’s required can easily kill the cultures.

    Table of Contents

    What Are Live Cultures in Yogurt?

    These days, with the advent of fast-moving eatables, we get frozen yogurt jars in the supermarket. To make these, the milk that’s used in fermenting the yogurt is pasteurized, which often kills the live cultures. 

    Store Bought Dairy Products

    To understand that, let’s first find out what are live cultures in yogurt. Live and active cultures in the yogurt, also called probiotics, are the healthy bacteria necessary to keep the health benefits of yogurt and keep the immune system working fine. 

    In general, yogurt contains a lot of different materials like protein, calcium, potassium, and different vitamins necessary for the body like vitamin B and D. These, if combined with the live active cultures, exponentially increase the potential health benefits of yogurt. Now, originally, yogurt needs to be fermented using the bacteria Lactobacillusdelbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus.

    These are important components of yogurt. However, as we mentioned before, some of the processing methods, with the type of heat used in the method, function to kill these bacteria. These thermophilus are highly beneficial and the extra heat devoids the yogurt of their benefits.

    Apart from these bacteria, yogurt can contain other live active cultures that are included in the fermentation process of the milk that’s turned into yogurt originally. These bacteria are Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. casei and Bicfidobacterium bifidum, among others.

    How Does It Work?

    How the process works is that to make yogurt, the milk is heated to around 85 degrees (Celsius) and then it’s made to cool down to a temperature of about 45 degrees (Celsius). After the milk has cooled down and reached the optimum temperature, the live culture is added. Then, the fermentation of the milk with the bacteria takes place for about 12 hours at a constant temperature of 45 degrees (Celsius).

    Commercial Production

    Any misadventure with this temperature is enough to kill off the federal reserve bank services routing number lookup important bacterial cultures in the yogurt. The National Yogurt Association (NYA), through its Live & Active Culture seal initiative, has set its own rules for live and active cultures. So, all frozen yogurt sold in the market must have at least 100 million live active cultures per gram at the time of processing.

    Only if this condition is achieved can the yogurt manufacturers get the seal of National Yogurt Association, 

    These live active cultures of the two main living organisms, Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus, along with other cultures like Lactobacillus acidophillus and Bifidus are killed when the yogurt is heat treated after fermentation.

    What Are the Benefits of Live Active Cultures?

    Different types of bacterial cultures, or as we technically call them — probiotics — can have different health benefits with respect to the physical being. Some may directly benefit a particular organ or some may benefit the immune system by increasing the defense function of the body.

    Children Playing Outside

    The live active cultures added in yogurt function the same way. For instance, according to research published in a leading European health journal, yogurt that contained the culture L. casei proved to be a lot more beneficial to the immune system of students appearing for their examinations. These cultures are also known to help more than just being a placebo.

    Some particular health benefits of the live cultures in yogurt are:

    • Cure for Antibiotics: Most antibiotics given in any treatment are strong enough to damage and kill the bacteria already present in the body, even the ones that are necessary for the functioning of the internal mechanism. This reduces the strength of the immune system as it’s capacity to fight with external negative stimuli diminishes greatly. Yogurt containing live active cultures helps in reversing this process and recover the body faster. It can also be a treatment for the side effects of antibiotics, like gas, digestive tract damage and more.
    • Immune System: The live active cultures in yogurt are specifically good for the immune system and help in strengthening it. The bacteria in yogurt have the capacity to regulate the body’s immune system and protect it against the external bacteria that can prove infectious. Thus, eating yogurt with live active cultures might directly help in making your body internally strong with a solid wall of defense.
    • Calcium Component: Calcium is a vital element to maintain a healthy body and strong bones. Yogurt inherently is rich in nutrients like calcium that helps in maintaining the strength of bones. The ones that have live active cultures further increase the effect.
    • Fights Diarrhea: While it may take a stronger culture to fight extreme types of diarrhea, inherently, the live active cultures present in yogurt can prove really effective in fighting diarrhea. These cultures are likely to prevent diarrhea that’s caused due to antibiotics or outside infections. Some probiotics can also be effective in treating irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Generally, the probiotics present in yogurt can be used to treat types of diarrhea like traveler’s diarrhea that’s caused by eating bad or stale food. It can also benefit other diarrhea related to rotavirus.
    • Good for Lactose Intolerance: There are millions of people who are lactose intolerant, which means that can’t eat any dairy products. All dairy products can result in digestive problems and infections along with severe cramps and pain in the digestive tract. However, eating yogurt that contains live active cultures isn’t so much of a problem for even lactose intolerant people. The bacteria present in the yogurt make it easier for the lactose to get digested by breaking it down so that the body can easily digest it, thus, avoiding any side effects that are faced due to eating dairy products.

    In general, yogurt is a rich source of some of the most essential proteins, minerals and vitamins. The live active cultures in yogurt also work as probiotics helping the immune system.

    Some of these cultures have also been known to help in cancer treatment, as has been revealed by extensive research. Not to mention, these live active cultures in yogurt actively work to strengthen the bones and prevent osteoporosis.

    Difference Between Heat-Treated and Live Active Cultures Yogurt

    The main thing to remember while buying processed yogurt is whether it contains live active cultures or it’s heat treated. Heat-treated yogurt is processed using heat after it’s fermented which damages the live cultures.

    Preparing a Healthy Breakfast

    The National Yogurt Association has explicitly laid down the guidelines for the quantity of cultures that yogurt must contain when it is being manufactured according to the health benefits these cultures offer. 

    To make sure that you buy only the yogurt that contains live active cultures, you need to seek out the products that have the official Live & Active Cultures seal of the National Yogurt Association certifying the presence of adequate live active cultures in yogurt. 

    A valid question to ask here would be that if the live active cultures in yogurt are so beneficial, why do manufacturers heat treat the yogurt in the first place. This is primarily for the commercial success of the product since the amazon fire stick audio out of sync treatment increases the longevity of the food product and reduces the natural sourness that it possesses. Many side products of yogurt are devoid of these cultures, including yogurt pretzels and candies. 

    The Live & Active Cultures midland states bank routing number rockford il seal program is a voluntary initiative and the only way for the manufacturers to get the seal of the association is by presenting a lab report as evidence of the live active cultures in yogurt produces. 

    Popular Brands of Live Culture Yogurt

    Different brands offer different types of yogurt. Some may include live cultures while some may be heat treated. Some popular live culture yogurt brands that contain beneficial bacteria like L. acidophillus include the following:

    • Chobani: Chobani is a brand of Greek yogurt and one of the most popular yogurt brands. The yogurt from Chobani is a live culture yogurt that contains active cultures including Streptococcus thermophilus and L. acidophilus.
    • Siggi’s: A US-based grimes and azealia banks brand, Siggi’s manufactures Icelandic yogurt known as skyr that has a fairly sour texture. It contains multiple probiotics and live cultures including L. acidophilus.
    • Fage: Fage is a multinational conglomerate that manufactures yogurt and several by products of yogurt. Each of the products includes probiotics like L. acidophilus.

    It’s important to know live culture yogurt from the http www comerica com webbanking one, especially if you is live culture yogurt good for you a regular consumer of yogurt.

    Источник: https://yogurtnerd.com/what-is-live-culture-yogurt/

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