red directive 2014 53 eu pdf

TÜV SÜD is an EU Notified Body and can evaluate consumer products for CE compliance with the requirements of the Radio Equipment Directive (RED) 2014/53/EU. Under the Radio Equipment Directive. Information sheet on obligations associated with the placing of radio equipment on the market. (Directive 2014/53/EU). In Europe there is a single market which covers all European Union must comply with the requirements set in the 2014/53/EU Radio Equipment Directive.
red directive 2014 53 eu pdf
red directive 2014 53 eu pdf
red directive 2014 53 eu pdf

Red directive 2014 53 eu pdf -



Guideline RED 12 2018

Guide radio equipment directive 2014/53/EU "RED"

Response to draft Delegated Regulation supplementing Directive 2014/53/EU

Introduction

DIGITALEUROPE appreciates the opportunity to provide its feedback to the European Commission’s draft Delegated Regulation under Arts 3(3)(d)–(f) of the Radio Equipment Directive (RED).

In the following comments we expand on:

  • The scope of application, particularly with respect to the definition of ‘wearable device’;
  • The applicability of Art. 3(3)(d); and
  • The necessary period for the delegated act’s entry into application.

This response builds on our previous contributions in the context of the Expert Group on Radio Equipment.[1]

 


Scope

Internet-connected devices

We welcome improvements made in the draft, such as the updated definition of ‘internet-connected radio equipment.’ With this terminology, devices that could potentially present cybersecurity risks are sufficiently covered.

However, the use of ‘can’ still appears to capture misuse of equipment beyond what the manufacturer can foresee, which goes beyond Art. 17 RED and the intended use described in the instructions available to the end user.

Proposed changes to Art. 1(1)

Theessentialrequirementsetout inArticle3(3),point(d),ofDirective2014/53/EUshall applytoanyradioequipmentthatcan is intended tocommunicateitselfovertheinternet,whetherit communicates directly or via any other equipment (‘internet-connected radio equipment’).

Radio equipment designed or intended exclusively for childcare

We welcome the removal of ‘child device.’ However, the term ‘childcare’ is equally ambiguous, with the restriction ‘exclusively’ also open to interpretation.

We urge again that devices that pose most risks are already covered by the categories of ‘internet-connected device’ and ‘wearable device,’ and that we see no need to expand the definition for toy devices.

Proposed changes to Art. 1(2)(b)

  • (b) radio equipment designed or intended exclusively for childcare;

Wearable devices

A wider scope to all radio equipment designed or intended, whether exclusively or not exclusively, to be worn on, strapped to, or hung from any part of the human body or any clothing seems disproportionate to the identified risks.

While the roadmap pointed out that GPS trackers for kids were an issue as data could be intercepted via the internet, the case study was focused on smart watches and activity trackers. Other wearables (e.g. a small music player attached to clothes, digital cameras strapped around the neck) do not constantly process activity data, health status or communication messages.

Therefore, the delegated act text should revert to the narrower and more restrictive definition put forward in EG RE (09)05r01.

Proposed changes to Art. 1(2)(d)

  • (d) radio equipment designed or intended, whether exclusively or not exclusively, to be worn on, strapped to, or hung from any of the following:
  • (i) any part of the human body, including the head, neck, trunk, arms, hands, legs and feet;
  • (ii) any clothing, including headwear, hand wear and footwear, which is worn by human beings;

 


Applicable RED articles

Art. 3(3)(d)

Cybersecurity is a moving target, with new vulnerabilities discovered every day even after placement on the market. For this reason, post-market obligations for cybersecurity management are not comparable with current practice with respect to other radio requirements, such as output power and EMC disturbance, which are relatively stable and measurable.

This cannot easily be tackled by a delegated act under an existing directive, and more legal guidance is required before activating this article in particular.

In line with the better regulation objectives, the potential activation of Art. 3(3)(d) should be accompanied by its own impact assessment. We would like to underline that the provisions of Art. 3(3)(d) have not been covered explicitly in the impact assessment. Industry feedback, as a consequence, did not provide specific input regarding this very relevant article.

Art. 3(3)(d) is more related to quality of service, as opposed to the requirements under Arts 3(3)(e) and (f), and the impact of its introduction as well as its relationship with the other two articles was not sufficiently assessed.

Applying ‘harming the network’ beyond the domain of radio communication, which is the scope of the RED, is a significant extension of the RED and creates considerable uncertainty as to how conformity of this article may be assessed. We recommend limiting the interpretation of ‘network’ in Art. 3(3)(d) to apply specifically to the radio network.

The combination of the very broad definition of internet-connected devices and the broadly formulated requirements contained in Art. 3(3)(d) leads to an impossible task of proving that no misuse can occur, both for manufacturers and for the relevant authorities.

As an example, the delegated act would require that laptops must prevent misuse of the network – any sending of malicious or unproductive packets – while the best cybersecurity today cannot achieve this on a general-purpose machine.

Art. 3(3)(d) has been developed with a view to ensuring radio network protection rather than internet cybersecurity. For such requirements, risk mitigation should be considered rather than defining absolute requirements.

DIGITALEUROPE stresses again that, while we support the need for cybersecurity requirements for products, this should not be achieved by an erroneous activation of the RED, in particular Art. 3(3)(d), and should instead be achieved through more appropriate and coherent horizontal legislation under the New Legislative Framework (NLF), which the Commission itself has announced as upcoming.[2]

Proposed change to Art. 1(1)

delete

We recommend conducting a detailed impact assessment on Art. 3(3)(d) first.

We understand that most stakeholders are of a different opinion. Should the Commission opt not to delete this article, we strongly recommend the inclusion of a recital aiming to prevent contradictions once the planned horizontal legislation comes into force:

(20) Preventing ambiguity in legal requirements on cybersecurity is of great importance for the effectiveness of Union legislation. Therefore, once more comprehensive Union harmonised legislation on cybersecurity enters into force (as announced in ‘The EU’s Cybersecurity Strategy for the Digital Decade, JOIN(2020) 18 final’), conformity with such legislation should be deemed sufficient for meeting the requirements of this Regulation.

 


Date of applicability

As evidenced by the input documents from the European standardisation organisations (ESOs) ETSI and CEN-CENELEC during the Expert Group meeting of February 2021, the timeframe for adopting harmonised standards is unrealistic:

  • ESOs cannot make reasonable preparation work to identify the requested appropriate HENs for RED containing the right set of verifiable requirements within the expected very short time frame (24 months), and for industry to implement the resulting products.[3]
  • it appears that the suggested of 18-24 months does not appear practical for the ESOs to deliver harmonised standards.[4]

In addition, the REDCA, the sectoral group of notified bodies under the RED, indicated that it will be difficult to assess an excessive number of products according to the new essential requirements in case no harmonised standards are available on time.

As harmonised standards are a key tool under the NLF to allow manufacturers to place their equipment on the single market, adequate time needs to be given to the ESOs to adopt good-quality standards.

DIGITALEUROPE appreciates that Recital 18 of the draft delegated act mentions that ‘[e]conomic operators should be provided with a sufficient time to proceed with the necessary adaptations to classes or categoriesof radio equipment.’ The above statements from the key stakeholders indicate that the standardisation process cannot be achieved in 24 months. In addition to the standardisation work, manufacturers need at least 18 months after the relevant harmonised standards are cited in the Official Journal of the European Union (OJEU) to implement the technical requirements defined in the standard.

In a spirit of compromise, DIGITALEUROPE believes that a date for entry into application should be 42 months after entry into force of the delegated act. This timeframe will strike the right balance between manufacturers’ obligations and the urgency stemming from the EU’s Cybersecurity Strategy.

Should the Commission nevertheless proceed with the 30-month period, we strongly request that the scope of the standardisation request be limited to minimum baseline requirements only, as was also supported by several Member States.[5] This would be needed in order to avoid disruption of the single market at the time the delegated act applies.

Proposed change

It shall apply from … [OP please insert the date = 30 42 months after the date of entry into force of this Regulation].

 


References

[1] See notably our Response to EG RE (09)05r01, March 2021.

[2] JOIN(2020) 18 final.

[3] EG RE (09)11.

[4] EG RE (09)10.

[5] See EG RE (02)05r1.

Источник: https://www.digitaleurope.org/resources/response-to-draft-delegated-regulation-supplementing-directive-2014-53-eu/
Dec. 2018

Version 12 December 2018

This Guide is intended to serve as a manual for all parties directly or indirectly affected by the Radio Equipment Directive 2014/53/EU (RED). It should assist in the interpretation of the RED but cannot take its place; it explains and clarifies some of the most important issues related to the Directive’s application. The Guide also aims to disseminate widely the explanations and clarifications reached by consensus among Member States and other stakeholders.

This Guide will be reviewed periodically to be kept up to date.

This Guide is publicly available, but is not binding in the sense of a legal act adopted by any of the EU institutions, even if the word 'shall' is used in many parts of this Guide. In the event of any inconsistency between the provisions of the RED and this Guide, the provisions of the RED prevail.

The services of the European Commission undertake to maintain this guide to ensure that the information is accurate and up to date. Errors brought to the Commission’s attention, will be corrected. However, the Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to the information in this guide. The information:
- is of a general nature only and is not intended to address the specific circumstances of any particular individual or entity;
- is not necessarily comprehensive, complete, accurate or up-to-date;
- sometimes refers to external information over which the Commission has no control and for which the Commission assumes no responsibility;
- does not constitute legal advice.

Finally, attention is drawn to the fact that all references to the CE marking and EU Declaration of Conformity relate to the RED only and radio equipment only benefits from the free circulation in the Union market if the product complies with the
provisions of all the applicable Union legislation. Reference is therefore made, whenever necessary but not always, to other EU legal acts.

The purpose of this document is to give guidance, subject to the preceding disclaimer, on certain matters and procedures pertaining to the Radio Equipment Directive 2014/53/EU (hereinafter referred to as 'the RED'), which is applicable as of 13th June 2016. This Guide brings together information previously available in several TCAM documents and related Commission’s websites.

The Guide is based on the RED and on the “New Legal Framework ” described in the “Blue Guide 2016” (the “Blue Guide”)  and does not duplicate what is already contained in the Blue Guide which addresses horizontal issues. Hence, this Guide should be read in conjunction with the Blue Guide. Moreover, other more specific guidance or documents might be issued by the Commission services, TCAM or ADCO RED providing guidance or information on specific issues or items, for example:
-Supplementary Guidance on the LVD/EMCD/RED (combined equipment);
-Subclasses: class 1 equipment;
-Notification of draft interface regulations;
-National language requirements of the national implementation of the RED.

This version replaces the previous versions of 19 May 2017 and 5 June 2018.

...

Contents
Introduction
1 Scope
1.1 General
1.2 Geographic application 
1.2.1 Application in non-EU States, countries & territories
1.2.2 Mutual Recognition Agreements (MRAs)
1.2.2.1 MRA with Switzerland 
1.2.3 Agreements on Conformity Assessment and Acceptance (ACAAs)
1.3 Placing on the market
1.4 Putting into service
1.5 Special measures regarding radio equipment at trade fairs, etc
1.6 Radio equipment
1.6.1 What is radio equipment? 
1.6.2 What is explicitly excluded from the scope of the RED? 
1.6.2.1 Radio equipment exclusively used for activities concerning public security, defence, State security
1.6.2.2 Radio equipment used by radio amateurs
1.6.2.3 Marine equipment 
1.6.2.4 Airborne equipment 
1.6.2.5 Custom-built evaluation kits
1.6.3 Specific cases / examples (non-exhaustive)
1.6.3.1 Non-radio products which function with radio equipment/electrical and electronic equipment with non-electrical products
1.6.3.2 Infrared devices (IR)
1.6.3.3 Products that use electromagnetic waves exclusively for other purposes than radio communication and/or radiodetermination
1.6.3.4 Antennas 
1.6.3.5 Amplifiers and other equipment intended to be connected to antennas 
1.6.3.6 DVB receivers
1.6.3.7 Jammers
1.6.3.8 Construction kits
1.6.3.9 Specific components (radio) 
1.6.3.10 Radio equipment installed in vehicles
1.6.3.11 Fixed Installations
1.6.3.12 Power plugs attached to radio equipment
1.6.3.13 RFID TAG
1.6.3.14 Cabling and wiring
2 Obligations of the economic operators
2.1 General
2.2 Manufacturer
2.3 Authorised representative 
2.4 Importer
2.5 Distributor
2.6 Description of the manufacturer’s responsibilities
3 Essential requirements
3.1 General
3.2 Essential requirements applicable to all radio equipment
3.3 Essential requirements applicable only to a certain type of radio equipment
4 Interface regulations & specifications 
4.1 Notification of radio interface specifications
4.2 Assignment of radio equipment classes
5 Harmonised Standards
5.1 Introduction
5.2 Generic harmonised standards vs product specific harmonised standard
5.3 Revision of harmonised standards
6 Notified bodies
6.1 Introduction
6.2 General concept
6.2.1 Annex III procedure — EU-type examination and conformity to type based on internal production control
6.2.2 Annex IV procedure — Conformity based on full quality assurance
6.4 Coordination between notified bodies
7 Market surveillance and enforcement
8 Delegated Acts, Implementing Acts and Commission Decisions 
8.1 Delegated and Implementing acts
8.1.1 Delegated acts
8.1.2 Implementing Acts
8.1 Commission Decisions adopted under the R&TTED
9 Other applicable or related EU legislation
9.1 General
9.2 EU Environmental legislation
9.3 Applicability of RED with other EU acts on safety or EMC
9.4 General Product Safety Directive 2001/95/EC (GPSD)
9.5 Relationship between the RED and LVD/EMCD 
10 Comparison R&TTED – RED
10.1.1 Changes between the scopes
10.1.2 Other changes (non-exhaustive list)
10.1.3 What happens with Commission Decisions taken according to R&TTED?
10.1.4 What happens with the “Alert sign”?
11 Transitional provisions for products falling under the scope of the RED 
11.1 Applicability of the RED and the new LVD/EMC
11.2 General comments 
11.3 Overview of the applicability of the Directives 2014/53/EU (RED), 2014/35/EU(LVD) and 2014/30/EU(EMCD)
11.3.1 Products within old LVD/EMCD and continue to be within new LVD/EMCD (even after applicability of RED)
11.3.2 Products within R&TTE that remain within the scope of RED
11.3.3 Products within old/new LVD/EMCD but then fall within RED (after applicability of RED)
For example pure television and sound broadcasting receivers
11.3.4 Products within R&TTED and then outside RED 
For example pure wired telecom terminal equipment
ANNEX 1 — Organisations and committees mentioned in this document
ANNEX 2 — Acronyms and abbreviations
6.3 Information exchange 

_________

Fonte: Commissione Europea


Info e download

Tutte le Guide ufficiali CE


Collegati:
Nuova Direttiva R&TTE 2014/53/UE (Direttiva RED)
Decreto Legislativo 22 giugno 2016 n. 128
Guide ufficiali UE Nuovo Approccio
Norme armonizzate direttiva RED


Источник: https://certifico.com/newsletter/archive/view/listid-69-costruzioni/mailid-32743-guide-radio-equipment-directive-2014-53-eu-red-dec-2018

EU Directives

Three new Directives for the electrical sector have been published and are now in effect: the EMCD (Directive 2014/30/EU), the LVD (Directive 2014/35/EU) and the RED (Directive 2014/53/EU). When comparing these directives to the previous version you will find that many changes were made, particularly to the RED and its applicability to certain product families. Unfortunately the changes are numerous enough that we cannot summarize them all. There has been some confusion as to the date of applicability and transitional period for these new Directives, so the purpose of this article is to try to provide some guidance.

New EMC Directive 2014/30/EU

Since 20 April 2016, the new European Union EMC Directive 2014/30/EU is now in effect and the previous EMC Directive 2004/1008/EC has been withdrawn. The new directive is a “recast” directive and does not change the scope or essential requirements as related to the current directive it replaces (except for changes introduced in the scope of the RED that affect the EMC Directive).

The new EMCD applies to products “placed on the market”* on or after 20 April 2016.
(* For definition of “placed on market” see “Placing on the Market” section below)

Many former requirements remain the same and are listed in Annex 1. Some of the changes are identified below:

  • The EMC Directive now formally applies to importers, designated representatives, and distributors as well as to manufacturers.
  • There are additional technical requirements regarding detailed documentation required for the technical file including manufacturing drawings and conceptual designs related to components and circuitry used in the device, including sub-assemblies, along with any explanations needed for operation and use of the device as intended. The technical file is required to be available for 10 years after the product or device is placed on the market.
  • Declaration of Conformity (DoC) must be in the official language or languages of the member states where the devices or product is placed on the market. It must be updated to reflect the new EMC Directive number 2014/30/EU. A review of the standards used for compliance is strongly suggested to ensure the current standards, revisions and relevant dates are properly identified.

    What I (Donald Sweeney) would do as of 2/1/2017:

    For EMC and LVD, issue your DoC (in English) as directed in the link given by the commission. (See example given below under “Making a new DoC.”) Do not include it with your product, but keep it with your technical file.

    If it is requested from the authorities, see if they will take the English version and if not, have it changed ASAP (within 2 days) to the required language.

    I would issue instruction manuals in all languages of the EU. I would do this by having them in a single manual, such that you are sure the manual contains the language of the country the product is being sold in.

New Low Voltage (Safety) Directive (LVD) 2014/35/EU

A new LVD Directive 2014/35/EU was published in the Official Journal of the European Communities on 29 March 2014. It replaces the previous version (2006/95/EC) and became effective on 20 April 2016. It is a “recast” directive and does not change the scope or essential requirements as related to the current directive it replaces (except for changes introduced in the scope of the RED that affect the LVD Directive).

The new LVD is applied to products “placed on the market”* on or after 20 April 2016.
(* For definition of “placed on market” see “Placing on the Market” section below)

A brief summary of the most significant LVD changes follows:

  • Market surveillance procedures were added
  • The LVD now clearly indicates that the product manufacturer is solely responsible for preparation of the documentation for CE marking, preparation of the EU Declaration of Conformity (DoC), making sure all directives/EU requirements applicable to the product are covered when affixing the CE mark
  • The option for intervention of a Notified Body was removed
  • Text was added to indicate that the DoC needs to be translated into the languages required by each EU country where the product is sold. (See Declaration of Conformity under EMC Directive.)
  • The manufacturer is now required to only keep the applicable documentation and DoC for 10 years after placing the actual product on the market
  • Internal production control was designated as the main conformity assessment procedure
  • The technical documentation is now required to also include analysis and assessment of all foreseeable risks associated with the product. This can be a major project.
  • A change in scope now includes protection of health of people, animals, and property, including risks from the use of any electrical equipment, including those that are mechanical or chemical in nature
  • New references to risks that are related to noise, vibration, and ergonomics must be addressed

New Radio Equipment Directive (RED) 2014/53/EU Now in Effect

The new Radio Equipment Directive 2014/53/EU (RED) replaces the R&TTE Directive 1999/5/EC. The RED is now in effect and only applies to products placed on the market/put into service on or after 13 June 2016. There is a 1-year transition period applicable for this Directive that applies as follows:

For products within the scope of the current R&TTE Directive and which remain within the scope of the RED:

  • For products placed on market* between 13 June 2016 and 12 June 2017, you may use either the R&TTED or RED
  • For products placed on market* after 12 June 2017, use only the RED, updating all R&TTE to RED or what is applicable

(* For definition of “placed on market” see “Placing on the Market” section below)

For products currently within the old & new LVD & EMCD that fall within the RED beginning 13 June 2016 (i.e. TV and sound broadcast receivers):

  • For products placed on market* between 13 June 2016 and 12 June 2017, the RED or new LVD/EMCD may be used
  • For products placed on market* after 12 June 2017, use only the RED

(* For definition of “placed on market” see “Placing on the Market” section below)

For products currently within the R&TTE Directive but will be outside the RED (i.e. Wired Terminal equipment):

  • For products placed on market* after 12 June 2016, the RED is not applicable to these products; therefore, the new LVD/EMCD (if applicable to the product in question) must be used

(* For definition of “placed on market” see “Placing on the Market” section below)

Most important are the changes in the scope of the RED, which will only apply to radio products. The provisions for Telecom and Terminal Equipment are no longer referenced in the RED. Broadcast receivers will fall under the provision of the RED directive as well.  The RED covers all essential requirements for EMC, Electrical Safety, and Radio & Radio Spectrum aspects of the product. Therefore, the EMC and Low Voltage Directives do not apply to radio products.

Some of the changes brought about by the new RED are listed below:

  • Receive-only equipment is moved to the RED.
  • Radio receiver minimum performance requirements contributing to the efficient use of radio spectrum now are included under the scope of the RED.  These apply to all receivers including broadcast radio and TV receivers.
  • RED is for wireless equipment used for communication only.  Radio-determination equipment becomes explicitly included.
  • There is no lower limit of the covered frequency range (for R&TTE, the lower limit was 9 kHz). The upper frequency limit remains at 3000 GHz.
  • All wired TTE equipment is out of the RED and defaults to the EMC Directive.
  • The notification procedure for radio equipment using non-harmonized frequency bands has been eliminated.
  • Radio technical documentation must include confirmation of operation in at least one Member State without infringing requirements on the use of radio spectrum.
  • Interworking with accessories such as common chargers can be invoked under Article 3.3 if decided by the European Commission.
  • The RED includes better defined obligations and responsibilities for manufacturers, designated representatives, importers and distributors.
  • The RED specifies strengthening of market surveillance, more sample testing of products by the manufacturer/importer, and a formal register of complaints, updates, and product recalls.
  • The Notified Body Opinion (Annex IV of R&TTE Directive) is replaced by a “Type Examination”.  This procedure specifies that modifications made to products which affect compliance must be reviewed and agreed upon by the Notified Body.
  • A Notified Body database will be established, in which Notified Bodies must record information specific to the certificate, including the scope, refusal, restrictions, suspension or withdrawal. All EU Member States must be informed of the Type Examination Certificate.
  • Notified Body identification number is prohibited from being used in the CE marking on products which followed the Type Examination procedure.
  • Notified Body number must be used in Declaration of Conformity where Full Quality Assurance procedure is followed.

“Placing on the Market”

Each individual serial number of a product is considered to be “placed on the market” when it is made available for the first time on the European Union Market and must comply with the harmonized legislation in effect at that moment. The “moment” is defined as when a manufacturer or importer supplies a product to a distributor or an end-user for the first time. This can only be done by a manufacturer or an importer. Any subsequent operation, for instance from a distributor to a distributor or from a distributor to an end-user, is defined as “making available” and not defined as “placing on the market.”

The concept of “placing on the market” refers to each individual product, not to a specific model of a product whether it was manufactured as an individual unit or in series. Consequently, even though a product model or type has been supplied before new European Union harmonization legislation laying down new mandatory requirements entered into force, individual units of the same model or type which are placed on the market after the new requirements have become applicable must comply with these new requirements.

Placing a product on the market requires an offer or an agreement (written or verbal) between two or more legal or natural persons for the transfer of ownership, possession or any other property right concerning the product in question. This transfer could be for payment or free of charge. It does not require the physical handover of the product.

Making a new DoC

The commission has issued some significant changes to what you need to do to allow your product to have an orderly placement in the European Marketplace during 2016 and 2017. You will need to generate a new DoC.

There is a recommended DoC form on the following web location: 
http://ec.europa.eu/growth/sectors/electrical-engineering/emc-directive/index_en.htm#t_0_1
Click on Guidance and then ADCO Documents and Recommendations.
Or Click Here to Download (2016-01-04 example of EMC DoC).

The real PDF file includes fillable form fields. You can print the completed form and save it to your device.I also believe this form can be modified to include any directive you need to add. -Don Sweeney

Until clearer direction is available from the commission, when placing a product on the market (see prior definition of “placing on the market”) just before or just after the expiration date, I (Donald L. Sweeney) would suggest that you include in your new DoC a statement such as one of the following:

For EMC:
“The object of the declaration described herein is in conformity with the relevant EU legislation EMC Directive 2014/30/EU.” See example DoC above.

For LVD:
“The object of the declaration described herein is in conformity with the relevant EU legislation Directive 2014/35/EU.” See example DoC above.

For RED:
See example of full DoC above.

·A DoC is required for the RED (similar to the R&TTED).

·Instead of the full DoC, supply the alternative simplified DoC with the product. A limited DoC is mandatory.

·A version of the limited DoC, in all official languages of the EU that have been published, can be found in Annex VII of the RED and is also shown below.

·Keep the full DoC in English only at your office (or your website).

It would not make sense to have the full DoC on your website in all EU languages. Only supply the full DoC if an authority requests it. If another language is required, then have it translated ASAP (as indicated in #1).

SIMPLIFIED EU DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY

The English version of the Simplified EU declaration of conformity referred to in Article 10(9) shall be provided as follows: “Hereby, [Name of manufacturer] declares that the Radio equipment type [designation of type of radio equipment] is in compliance with Directive 2014/53/EU. The full text of the EU declaration of conformity is available at the following internet address: [www. place manufacturer’s web address here.com]

For your convenience, D.L.S. has downloaded all official language versions of the RED directive, copied only Annex VII from each, and combined them all into a single Word document. If you follow the directions at the top of the page to substitute the 3 items you are required to fill in for each language, you will have your Simplified DoC for your product for the RED. Be sure to only copy the Annex VIIs (not the instructions at the top) into your form to be supplied with the product. Please confirm the Simplified DoC makes sense for your application. CLICK HERE to download your working form.

We suggest that you also add to the full DoC the rationale of why it meets the new directive.

CLICK HERE to go to our EU Blue Guide page to download the latest 26 July 2016 version.

Источник: https://www.dlsemc.com/eu-directives/

Summary:

Directive 2014/53/EU (also known as Radio Equipment Directive - RED) - adopted by the European Union on 16 April 2014 - relating to the harmonisation of the laws of the Member States on the availability on the market of radio equipment. It also repeals Directive 1999/5/EC.

Further information:

Directive 1999/5/EC on radio equipment and telecommunications terminal equipment and the mutual recognition of their conformity (the R&TTE Directive), establishes a framework for the placing on the market, free movement and putting into service in the EU of radio equipment and telecommunications terminal equipment. The Directive entered into force in 1999 and was crucial to achieving an internal market in this area. It includes essential requirements for the protection of health and safety, of electromagnetic compatibility and for the avoidance of harmful interference. These requirements are translated into technical requirements within non-mandatory harmonised standards.

In October 2012, the European Commission adopted a proposal aimed at addressing a number of previously detected issues concerning the Directive. The revised rules aim to keep pace with the growing number and variety of radio equipment devices and ensure that they do not interfere with each other and respect essential health and safety requirements. It also sets out additional means for market surveillance to track and monitor products which fail to comply with the essential requirements.

The Directive applies to all equipment which emits or receives radio waves for radiodetermination or communication purposes. This includes devices such as mobile phones, car door openers and modems. It does not cover radio equipment used for public security and defence activities. The Directive also gives the Commission the possibility of making the compatibility of battery chargers an essential requirement for mobile phones.

Источник: https://www.europeansources.info/record/directive-2014-53-eu-on-the-harmonisation-of-the-laws-of-the-member-states-relating-to-the-making-available-on-the-market-of-radio-equipment/

Radio Equipment Directive

Directive of the European Union

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This article needs to be updated. Please help update this article to chilis bangor maine recent events or newly available information.(August 2020)

The Radio Equipment Directive (RED, EU directive 2014/53/EU) established a regulatory framework for placing radio equipment on the market in the EU. All radio equipment within the scope of this directive that are placed on the EU market must have been compliant with the directive from 13 June 2017. The delay of the publication and approval of the details of this directive has led to difficulties for companies attempting to comply with the directive.

Directive[edit]

This directive was published on 16 April 2014. It replaced the previous directive R&TTE 1999/5/EC as of 13 June 2016.[1] Equipment must be compliant with the new directive in order to be authorized to be placed on the market from 12 June 2017 and onward.

As approved by the European Commission, the directive contains legal definitions for the essential requirements of the classes and categories of equipment to which it applies. A list of specific requirements in the directive is contained within Article 3, Paragraph 3 of the directive.

Harmonized standards[edit]

A harmonised standard is a European standard developed by a recognised European Standards Organisation: CEN, CENELEC, or ETSI.[2] The directive outlines the requirements that must be met in order for Radio Equipment to meet the harmonized standard for these industry items.

The list of harmonized standards is regularly published on the official journal of the European Union. Each harmonized standard covers one or more essential requirements. More than one harmonized standard may in some cases be needed to meet all of the essential requirements of RED.

The responsibility for the creation of the harmonized standards for products in this directive falls with ETSI and Cenelec.

For example, a piece of Wi-Fi equipment will refer to the following harmonized standards:

  • EN 60950-1 (Essential requirement of article 3, paragraph 1, point a of the directive: safety – electrical safety)
  • EN 50371 (Essential requirement of article 3, paragraph 1, point a of the directive: safety – human exposure to electromagnetic fields)
  • EN 301 489-17 (Essential requirement of article 3, paragraph 1, point b of the directive: electromagnetic compatibility)
  • EN 300 328 (Essential requirement of article 3, paragraph 2 of the directive: efficient use of the radio spectrum)

Reception[edit]

Businesses are facing difficulties when complying with this new directive. The list of harmonized standards has not yet been fully completed. Harmonized standards for Wi-Fi 5 GHz routers, for FM receivers and for EMC and safety radio equipment have not been completed yet.

Researchers at the TU Darmstadt claim that German legislation disallows operation of flashed devices, even if they were created prior to the introduction of this new directive.[3]

The European Commission has been asked to reach a practical solution to this issue.[4] Nevertheless, industry associations have highlighted that it will be impossible for equipment to comply with new standards immediately,[5][6] especially when new technical requirements may lead to design modification for certain products.

The Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) dubbed the new directive the "Radio Lockdown Directive".[7] The FSFE restaurants in rockland county ny claimed that the directive will make it harder for small businesses to develop routers, since they will be tivoised and therefore GPLv3 incompatible. The FSFE has also stated that the tivoisation will disable the Freifunk project.

References[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radio_Equipment_Directive

Radio Equipment Directive, 2014/53/EU

Editor’s Note: The Radio Equipment Directive (RED), 2014/53/EU, must be used for new products manufactured after June 13, 2016 and becomes mandatory for all products June 13, 2017.

Abstract

This article provides an update on changes occurring as a result of the new Radio Equipment Directive (RED) 2014/53/EU which can be used from June of 2016. It looks at the changes in the product and regulatory landscape and at what it means to equipment manufacturers.

More detail on the history of the RED can be found in the article, Radio Equipment Directive, in the Interference Technology 2015 EMC Directory and Design Guide.

Scope of the Directive

The scope of the RED has been widened to include:

  • “Radio determination” equipment, such as radars and RFID devices. These devices were considered to be within the scope of the R&TTE Directive, but the RED’s scope is much what is sbi internet banking profile password making it more obvious that they are included and must comply.
  • “Sound and TV broadcast receivers” – these were excluded under R&TTE, so will now have additional requirements for radio spectrum performance.
  • “Receiver performance” – whilst this was covered in a number of ETSI product standards, its importance in an increasingly congested radio spectrum has made it part of the Directive.
  • “Devices operating below 9 kHz” – the lower frequency limit of R&TTE was 9 kHz, but that has been removed.
  • In line with other directives there is a specific exclusion for “Custom-built evaluation kits destined for professionals to be used solely at research and development facilities for such purposes.”

Timescales and red directive 2014 53 eu pdf periods

The European Commission has confirmed that there are four scenarios relating to the application of Directives 2014/53/EU, 2014/35/EU and 2014/30/EU i.

It has been noted that following these dates could create a large administrative burden on manufacturers in updating documentation and Declarations of Conformity, particularly for devices that fall out of the R&TTE directive and into EMC and LVD as they cannot take advantage of the transition period written into the RED.

Guidance on content of Declarations of Conformity specifies minimum content, but does not generally specify maximum content and additional useful information is generally accepted. Based on this there is a couple of red directive 2014 53 eu pdf currently under discussion within the commission to allow manufacturers to list both current and new directives on their Declarations of Conformity, e.g.

“The object of the declaration described above is in conformity with the relevant Union harmonisation legislation: Directive 1999/5/EC (until 12 June 2016), Directive 2014/30/EU (from 13 June 2016) and Directive 2014/35/EU (from 13 June 2016).”

Please note: at the time of publication this proposal had not been formally accepted. It is expected to be accepted early in March and will be published in the EU Docs Room ii. We will bring you an update as soon as we have it.

Some key points for manufacturers under RED:

  • The CE marking must appear on the device and on the packaging – the RED no longer requires CE mark to be in the user manual
  • The Notified Body number only goes on the product when the Full Quality Assurance route (R&TTE annex V / RED annex IV) and is not used where a NB has just reviewed the technical file.
  • The list of permitted countries should still go on the packaging and the user manual but there is no requirement for the alert mark, , for class 2 equipment and country notifications are no longer required.
  • The user manual must include frequency bands of operation and the maximum transmit power in each of those bands and this information must be in a language easily understood by the end user.
  • Any product containing a piece of “radio equipment” as defined in RED Article 2, falls under the RED – so a washing machine with a Zigbee radio falls under RED and not EMC and LVD.

Developments of new standards for RED

EMC

The radio equipment foreclosed homes for sale tulsa not allow application of the EMC Directive as was possible under the R&TTE, so all products containing radio equipment must be assessed against the Radio Equipment Directive.

  • ETSI are developing guide EG 203 367 iii, “Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Guide to the application of harmonized standards covering Articles 3.1b and 3.2 of the Directive 2014/53/EU (RE-D) to multi-radio and combined radio and non-radio equipment” which provides guidance on the application of Harmonised Standards to multi-radio and combined equipment. The document is still in a draft
    • Examples of equipment to be covered by the document include, but are not limited to, combination of multiple radio products in one radio equipment, combination of radio and IT or electro-technical equipment, RLAN enabled domestic appliance, radio controlled heating system, radio controlled lighting system, etc.

Radio Spectrum

  • ETSI are currently updating 156 article 3.2 radio spectrum standards for the RED, 34 of these are due for publication in the Official Journal during 2016 with the majority of the remainder following in 1st half of 2017.
  • Following a review of compatibility between LTE operating in the 800 MHz band and UHF Short-Range Devices, ETSI has red directive 2014 53 eu pdf work on the restructuring of EN 300 220. Work items have been adopted as follows:
    • EN 300 220-2: Harmonised Standard for non-specific radio equipment. Two versions are being developed: a version 3.1.1 with “category 3” receivers, intended to be best mortgage refinance rates in texas by v 3.2.1 with improved “category 2” receivers by December 2018.
    • EN 300 220-3-1: Social Alarms equipment operating in the designated frequency band (869.2 – 869.25 MHz)
    • EN 300 220-3-2: Wireless Alarms equipment operating in the designated frequency bands
    • EN 300 220-4: Metering radio equipment operating on designated frequency bands (169.4 – 169.4875 MHz)
  • ETSI has already published draft standards for TV and Broadcast receivers that are moving into RED due to the change in scope of this directive:
    • Draft ETSI EN 303 340 V1.1.0v, Digital Terrestrial TV Broadcast Receivers; Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of the Directive 2014/53/EU
    • Draft ETSI EN 303 345 V1.1.0vi, Radio Broadcast Receivers; Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of the Directive 2014/53/EU

Transition periods

In common with normal practise, there will be a transition period during which time existing standards may continue to be used, but manufacturers should keep an eye on the ETSI work program iv and keep up to date with standards as they are published.

 

References

  1. http://ec.europa.eu/DocsRoom/documents/11983/attachments/1/translations/en/renditions/pdf
  2. http://ec.europa.eu/DocsRoom/?locale=en i
  3. https://portal.etsi.org/webapp/WorkProgram/Report_WorkItem.asp?WKI_ID=47231
  4. http://webapp.etsi.org/ena/cvp.asp?search=RADIO
  5. https://www.etsi.org/deliver/etsi_en/303300_303399/303340/01.01.00_20/en_303340v010100a.pdf
  6. https://www.etsi.org/deliver/etsi_en/303300_303399/303345/01.01.00_20/en_303345v010100a.pdf
Источник: https://interferencetechnology.com/radio-equipment-directive-201453eu/


Guideline RED <i>red directive 2014 53 eu pdf</i> 2018

Guide radio equipment directive 2014/53/EU "RED"

Radio Equipment Directive

Radio Equipment Directive: consultation on the draft UK regulations

PDF, 108KB, 21 pages

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology.

Radio Equipment Directive: draft UK regulations

PDF, 431KB, 52 pages

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology.

Radio Equipment Directive: impact assessment

PDF, 114KB, 14 pages

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology.

Источник: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/radio-equipment-directive
Dec. 2018

Version 12 December 2018

This Guide is intended to serve as a manual for all parties directly or indirectly affected by the Radio Equipment Directive 2014/53/EU (RED). It should assist in the interpretation of the RED but cannot take its place; it explains and clarifies some of the most important issues related to the Directive’s application. The Guide also aims to disseminate widely the explanations and clarifications reached by consensus among Member States and other stakeholders.

This Guide will be reviewed periodically to be kept up to date.

This Guide is publicly available, but is not binding in the sense of a legal act adopted by any of the EU institutions, even if the word 'shall' is used in many red directive 2014 53 eu pdf of this Guide. In the event of any inconsistency between the provisions of the RED and this Guide, the provisions of the RED prevail.

The services of the European Commission undertake to maintain this guide to ensure that the information is accurate and up to date. Errors brought to the Commission’s attention, will be corrected. However, the Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to the information in this guide. The information:
- is of a general nature only and is not intended to address the specific circumstances of any particular individual or entity;
- is not necessarily comprehensive, complete, accurate or up-to-date;
- sometimes red directive 2014 53 eu pdf to external information over affirm wayfair payments the Commission has no control and for which the Commission assumes no responsibility;
- does not constitute legal advice.

Finally, attention is drawn to the fact that all references to the CE marking and EU Declaration of Conformity relate to the RED only and radio equipment only benefits from the free circulation in the Union market if the product complies with the
provisions of all the applicable Union legislation. Reference is therefore made, whenever necessary but not always, to other EU legal acts.

The purpose of this document is to give guidance, subject to the preceding disclaimer, on certain matters and procedures pertaining to the Radio Equipment Directive 2014/53/EU (hereinafter referred to as 'the RED'), which is applicable as of 13th June 2016. This Guide brings together information previously available in several TCAM documents and related Commission’s websites.

The Guide is based on the RED and on the “New Legal Framework ” described in the “Blue Guide 2016” (the “Blue Guide”)  and does not duplicate what is already contained in the Blue Guide which addresses horizontal issues. Hence, this Guide should be read in conjunction with the Blue Guide. Moreover, other more specific guidance or documents might be issued by the Commission services, TCAM or ADCO RED providing guidance or information on specific issues or items, for example:
-Supplementary Guidance on the LVD/EMCD/RED (combined equipment);
-Subclasses: class 1 equipment;
-Notification of draft interface regulations;
-National language requirements of the national implementation of the RED.

This version replaces the previous versions of 19 May 2017 and 5 June 2018.

.

Contents
Introduction
1 Scope
1.1 General
1.2 Geographic application 
1.2.1 Application in non-EU States, countries & territories
1.2.2 Mutual Recognition Agreements (MRAs)
1.2.2.1 MRA with Switzerland 
1.2.3 Agreements on Conformity Assessment and Acceptance (ACAAs)
1.3 Placing on the market
1.4 Putting into service
1.5 Special measures regarding radio equipment at trade fairs, etc
1.6 Radio equipment
1.6.1 What is radio equipment? 
1.6.2 What is explicitly excluded from the scope of the RED? 
1.6.2.1 Radio equipment exclusively used for activities concerning public security, defence, State security
1.6.2.2 Radio equipment used by radio amateurs
1.6.2.3 Marine equipment 
1.6.2.4 Airborne equipment 
1.6.2.5 Custom-built evaluation kits
1.6.3 Specific cases / examples (non-exhaustive)
1.6.3.1 Non-radio products which function with radio equipment/electrical and electronic equipment with non-electrical products
1.6.3.2 Infrared devices (IR)
1.6.3.3 Products that use electromagnetic waves exclusively for other purposes than radio communication and/or radiodetermination
1.6.3.4 Antennas 
1.6.3.5 Amplifiers and other equipment intended to be connected to antennas 
1.6.3.6 DVB receivers
1.6.3.7 Jammers
1.6.3.8 Construction kits
1.6.3.9 Specific components (radio) 
1.6.3.10 Radio equipment installed in vehicles
1.6.3.11 Fixed Installations
1.6.3.12 Power plugs attached to radio equipment
1.6.3.13 RFID TAG
1.6.3.14 Cabling and wiring
2 Obligations of the economic operators
2.1 General
2.2 Manufacturer
2.3 Authorised representative 
2.4 Importer
2.5 Distributor
2.6 Description of the manufacturer’s responsibilities
3 Essential requirements
3.1 General
3.2 Essential requirements applicable to all radio equipment
3.3 Essential requirements applicable only to a certain type of radio equipment
4 Interface regulations & specifications 
4.1 Notification of radio interface specifications
4.2 Assignment of radio equipment classes
5 Harmonised Standards
5.1 Introduction
5.2 Generic harmonised standards vs product specific harmonised standard
5.3 Revision of harmonised standards
6 Notified bodies
6.1 Introduction
6.2 General concept
6.2.1 Annex III procedure — EU-type examination and conformity to type based on internal production control
6.2.2 Annex IV procedure — Conformity based on full quality assurance
6.4 Coordination between notified bodies
7 Market surveillance and enforcement
8 Chase bank drive thru atm near me Acts, Implementing Acts and Commission Decisions 
8.1 Delegated and Implementing acts
8.1.1 Delegated acts
8.1.2 Implementing Acts
8.1 Commission Decisions adopted under the R&TTED
9 Other applicable or related EU legislation
9.1 General
9.2 EU Environmental legislation
9.3 Applicability of RED with other EU acts on safety or EMC
9.4 General Product Safety Directive 2001/95/EC (GPSD)
9.5 Relationship between the RED and LVD/EMCD 
10 Comparison R&TTED – RED
10.1.1 Changes between the scopes
10.1.2 Other changes (non-exhaustive list)
10.1.3 What happens with Commission Decisions taken according to R&TTED?
10.1.4 What happens with the “Alert sign”?
11 Transitional provisions for products falling under the scope of the RED 
11.1 Applicability of the RED and the new LVD/EMC
11.2 General comments 
11.3 Overview of the applicability of the Directives 2014/53/EU (RED), 2014/35/EU(LVD) and 2014/30/EU(EMCD)
11.3.1 Products within old LVD/EMCD and ally financial dealer services phone number to be within new LVD/EMCD (even after applicability of RED)
11.3.2 Products within R&TTE that remain within the scope of RED
11.3.3 Products within old/new LVD/EMCD but then fall within RED (after applicability of RED)
For example pure television and sound broadcasting receivers
11.3.4 Products within R&TTED and then outside RED 
For example pure wired telecom terminal equipment
ANNEX 1 — Organisations and committees mentioned in this document
ANNEX 2 — Acronyms and abbreviations
6.3 Information exchange 

_________

Fonte: Commissione Europea


Info e download

Tutte le Guide ufficiali CE


Collegati:
Nuova Direttiva R&TTE 2014/53/UE (Direttiva RED)
Decreto Legislativo 22 giugno 2016 n. 128
Guide ufficiali UE Nuovo Approccio
Norme armonizzate direttiva RED


Источник: https://certifico.com/newsletter/archive/view/listid-69-costruzioni/mailid-32743-guide-radio-equipment-directive-2014-53-eu-red-dec-2018

Radio Equipment Directive Consultation

Overview

The Government seeks views from stakeholders on the UK implementation of the Radio Equipment Directive 2014/53/EU (the Directive). The Directive came into full effect on 13 June 2016. This consultation does not address the content of the Directive as this has already been negotiated and agreed and was previously consulted on.

The Directive replaces the Directive on Radio and Telecommunications Terminal Equipment (RTTE) 99/5/EC as amended. It ensures that radio equipment placed on the market or put into service cardless nfc atm near me the EU and EEA (European Economic Area) meets essential safety requirements. The Directive also contains requirements for avoidance of harmful interference with the radio spectrum.

The Directive is one of a number of Directives that support the free movement of goods within the EU and EEA. This consultation seeks views on the Government’s proposed implementation of the Directive into UK law. We are seeking views from stakeholders about 3 key areas of our proposed implementation:

  • UK Draft Regulations to implement the Directive
  • Enforcement of the UK Regulations
  • The UK Impact Assessment on the Regulations

This gold usa hours is relevant to: manufacturers, importers and distributors of radio equipment and white goods; enforcement authorities; trade associations; RED Notified Bodies; consumers; and other Government Departments and Agencies.

The consultation document is available below, together with the UK Draft Regulations and UK Impact Assessment.

What happens next

This consultation is necessary to inform Government about likely effects of the implementation into UK law of the Radio Equipment Directive (2014/53/EU). Following consideration of the replies to this consultation the Government will publish its response. The Government’s response document will be placed on the GOV.UK website and copies of the replies made available on request. Please refer to Section 3.2 of the consultation paper for the policy on confidentiality.

Источник: https://beisgovuk.citizenspace.com/brdo/red-directive-consultation/

Radio Equipment Directive – what you need to know in 2019

As electronics product designers we know that the compliance process in electronics product development can appear intricate and precarious, if rules or regulations are misinterpreted.

Now, our community has the European Union’s new Radio Equipment Directive 2014/53/EU (RED) to grapple with.

The RED was published in the Official Journal of the EU (OJEU) on 22 May 2014, entered into effect on 11 June 2014 and is applicable as of 13 June 2016. It repealed the Radio Equipment and Telecommunications Terminal Equipment Directive 1999/5/EC6. It provided for one-year transitional period, which ended on 12 June 2017 (Article 48).[1]

With a significant bearing on how manufacturers gain a CE Mark, due to changes between the two frameworks, it’s crucial to fully understand these regulatory differences to avoid time and cost overruns.

Here’s an overview of the Radio Equipment Directive – its scope, impact on product design, and what you should do next.

Regulatory necessity for new Radio Equipment Directive

Traditionally, almost all devices dependent on the radio frequency spectrum to function mainly consisted of AV equipment, PCs, and telecommunications technology.

Since 2000, regulatory compliance and conformity has come under the Radio and Telecommunications Terminal Equipment Directive (the R&TTE Directive, 1999/5/EC).

Now, the Internet of Things has ushered in an age of ultra-connectivity with millions of items connected and communicating daily; smart cars, meters, jewellery, fitness devices – even smart paper… the list seems endless.

The relentless proliferation of IoT is also widely believed to have been a contributory factor to the R&TTE Directive revisions.

RED – its aims

The driving forces behind this new regulation were improving market surveillance and raising the number of products meeting compliance requirements. The RED ensures all radio devices (or ‘apparatus’) within its remit are compatible for use in the EU.

This is done through a regulatory mandate of standard technical requirements for telecommunications apparatus; allowing approved equipment to be sold without restriction between countries in the European Economic Area (EEA).

The Radio Equipment Directive – what are the main changes?

RED – main changes include:

  • No provision for Telecom Terminal Equipment (TTE); this now comes under the EMC (EMCD) or Low Voltage Directives (LVD)
  • No lower limit to the radio frequency spectrum. Under the RTT&E Directive, the range covered was between 9 kHz and 3000 GHz.
  • LVD safety obligations: no voltage limits for radio equipment
  • No alert sign (Class 2 labelling)
  • Provision for universal chargers to address wastage
  • Closer regulation of the activities of Notified Bodies
  • The manufacturer must inform the Notified Body of all modifications to the product that may affect compliance
  • Further clarification on market surveillance guidelines
  • Pure radio sound and radio TV receive-only equipment, which was excluded from Directive 1999/5/EC, falls within the scope of the RED
  • Equipment operating below 9 kHz falls within the scope of the RED
  • Radio-determination equipment is clearly included within the scope of the RED

RED – scope includes:

  • All Radio Receivers (Broadcast TV and radio equipment included)
  • Equipment capable of being connected to a public telecommunications network even if that is not its intended purpose
  • Examples of equipment included within the scope of the RED:
  • Cordless and mobile phones
  • Terminal adapters
  • Telephones
  • Modems

New listings:

  • Wireless Microphones; Audio PMSE up to 3 GHz
  • Assistive Listening Devices including personal sound amplifiers and inductive systems up to 3 GHz
  • Harmonised Standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of Directive 2014/53/EU
  • Global System for Mobile communications (GSM)
  • Mobile Stations (MS) equipment; harmonised standard covering the essential requirements of article 3.2 of Directive 2014/53/EU[2]

Read the full list of harmonised standards: https://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/red_en

Legacy products must also meet the latest RED harmonised standards. The (Electromagnetic Compatibility Directive) EMC, safety and Radio R&TTE harmonised standards will eventually be harmonised under RED.

Putting into service of radio equipment may include incorporation of radio equipment into a fixed installation. In the RED, the concept of fixed installations is not explicitly defined.

However, the RED requires in Article 3.1.b that “an adequate level of electromagnetic compatibility as set out in Red directive 2014 53 eu pdf 2014/30/EU” has to be ensured. With this, not only the relevant requirements of Annex I of the EMC Directive but also all the other regulations of the EMC Directive which apply to the EMC level are relevant. This applies, in particular, to the special requirements and procedures according to Article 19.1 and Annex I (2) of the EMCD for fixed installations.[3]

RED – scope excludes:

  • Amateur radio kits
  • Marine equipment
  • Airborne components and products (which fall under Article 3 of regulation EC216/2008)
  • Equipment for military, police and state-security
  • Pure wired telecom terminal equipment does not fall within the scope of the RED
  • Custom built evaluation kits destined for professionals to be used solely at research and development facilities for such purposes are explicitly excluded from the RED.
  • There are currently very few RED harmonised Radio standards and the R&TTE list has disappeared.

Further amends

  • Since 9 August 2018, equipment has to be labelled if there are restrictions for use.
  • Development of some product standards to demonstrate compliance (November 2017)
  • Updates to equipment lists that are not subject to use restriction (January 2018)
  • Brexit (could change anytime – last guidance was January 2019)
  • New version of RED guide for manufacturers published.

RED and the EMC Directive

We asked Anne Barr at The Compliance Map – a developer of supply chain and environmental compliance software solutions, to explain how RED affects the EMC Directive: ”the EMC requires equipment to be designed and manufactured to ensure that any electromagnetic disturbance generated does not impact the operation of radio and telecommunications equipment and that it is not impacted by such disturbance. It specifically excludes equipment covered by the Radio Equipment Directive (RED).

Therefore, the changes introduced by RED had two direct impacts on EMC:

  1. Telecom Terminal Equipment previously covered by the Radio and Telecommunication Terminal Equipment Directive (R&TTE) and not included in RED now falls within the EMC.
  2. Sound and TV receive-only equipment and radio equipment operating below 9 kHz previously excluded from the R&TTE are no longer by covered by the EMC.

However, Article 3 of RED requires radio equipment to have an adequate level of electromagnetic compatibility as set out in EMC, recognising that the essential requirements of the EMC were sufficient to cover equipment covered by RED. This effectively merges the requirements of EMC into RED.”

ByteSnap’s EMC testing chamber

Who’s affected by the Radio Equipment Directive?

  • All 27 EU member states
  • 3 EEA (European Economic Area) Countries EEA -EFTA states (Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein)
  • Switzerland

Impact on Product Designers

For new products the impact on product designers is minimal, as most products that fall under RED would also have fallen under R&TTE, so the testing will be required anyway.

How should electronics companies manage their responsibilities under RED?

Anne Barr advises that a compliance plan should be designed with reference to the EU RED guide for manufacturers.

“Roles and responsibilities should be assigned, and budget allocated for the following:

  • ensuring that the legislative requirements are understood and that changes are monitored
  • reviewing and updating existing conformity assessment procedures. The use of harmonised standards should be considered as it allows self-declaration of conformity. CENELEC and ETSI have already developed some standards.
  • revising product labelling, technical documentation and declaration of conformity as appropriate
  • amending risk management procedures e.g. sample testing, complaints monitoring and product recall as needed
  • communicating requirements both internally and externally.”

RED Post-Brexit*…What Happens Now?

Despite talk of a return to BSI (British Standards Institute) conformance, it’s too early to speculate foreclosed homes for sale tulsa a potential 2-tier compliance system for UK-manufactured devices.
Britain is in the early stages of leaving the European Union, a process which will take an estimated two years. So, as far as EU legislation – including the Radio Equipment Directive – is concerned, it’s business as usual.

Generally, in the event of a “no deal” Brexit, UK businesses would have to add an extra layer of compliance if they wish to place their goods on the EU market. Companies importing EU products to the UK which require third party testing under the New Approach Directives could continue to do so until further notice, but companies importing goods under the Mutual Rec The results of the negotiations between the UK Government and Brussels remain to be seen.

In the meantime and in terms of preparing for a “no deal” Brexit, the UK government will confirm status on any new UK product compliance markings.[4]

To find out more on European harmonised radio spectrum usage, try the EFIS tool – the European Communications Office’s Frequency Information System.

[1]https://www.cept.org/files/4940/Report%20EC%20to%20Council-Parliament%20about%20RED%20Nov%202018.pdf

[2]http://www.lpra.org/

[3]http://www.mgrt.gov.si/fileadmin/mgrt.gov.si/pageuploads/DNT/SP/novi_pristop/RED-radijska_oprema/RED_guide_5_junij_2018.pdf

[4]https://www.twobirds.com/en/news/articles/2018/uk/brexit-and-product-compliance-no-deal-scenario

*Since the article was first published, the United Kingdom left the European Red directive 2014 53 eu pdf on December 31st 2020.

Источник: https://www.bytesnap.com/news-blog/eu-red-2019/

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