what is the capital city of oregon

National Federation of the Blind of Oregon Capital City Chapter who we are and where we meet. Salem is the capital city of the state of Oregon and also the county seat of Marion County. It is situated about 46 miles southwest of Portland in Oregon's. Photo about State Capitol Park in Salem the Capital City of Oregon in USA. Image of grass, building, capitol - 209069393.
what is the capital city of oregon

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what is the capital city of oregon

Capital of Oregon

(Last Updated On: February 22, 2018)

Despite the fact that many of us have had to memorize them since we were children, U.S. capitals often seem unintuitive when you take the time to think about it. For example, why doesn’t the state’s most prosperous city get the title of capital? You could make the case here for many states, like New York City over Albany for New York or New Orleans over Baton Rouge for Louisiana. Another possible example is Salem in Oregon, and historically, some people in the state felt the same way.

The Founding of Salem

Salem is in the heart of the Willamette Valley, initially settled by the Kalapuya Native American people. In their language, they called it Chim-i-ki-ti, which meant “meeting place” or “resting place.” The first settlers who came to the area were led by Methodist Jason Lee in 1840. This was his second attempt to create a mission in the then-Oregon Country. At the time, the area was known as Chemeketa, a variant on its original Native American name. Others called it Mill Creek due to its proximity to the eponymous body of water.

So macys star rewards pay bill does one go from the native name to Salem? It’s not entirely clear. The most common concept held is that William H. Wilson, who planned out the original town in 1846, chose the name in tribute to the Hebrew word Shalom. Other theories include that it was in reference to Salem, Massachusetts.

Capital Clashes

The Willamette Heritage Center explains that the provincial government of Oregon (remember, these were the pioneer days) was originally set up in Oregon City. Oregon City had the advantage of being centrally located. However, being a river port town and situated on the Oregon Trail meant that Salem was prospering economically at the time. In 1851, the territory’s legislature passed a bill that named Salem the formal capital, Portland the home of the territory jail, and Maryville (known as Corvallis today) as the home of the territory’s university.

Despite the fact that Salem what is the capital city of oregon the capital was law, not everyone was happy about the decision. Being the seat of power for the local government more jobs and revenue to the surrounding community. Other cities wanted what Salem had, and this led to squabbling for years. Right after the bill was passed, the territory’s governor spoke out against it. At one point, some legislators refused to meet in the city to legislate.

The U.S. Congress passed a resolution to confirm what is the capital city of oregon Salem was the capital, but the story didn’t end there. Before the capitol building was even built, the state moved the capital to Maryville before moving it back shortly afterward. However, Salem’s capitol building ended up burning down, still leaving things up in the air. At this point, Eugene and Portland were the strongest contenders.

In the end, it would be the people of Oregon who made Salem its capital, when the issue was decided by general election in 1862 and 1864. Salem beat out Portland in both cases, with nearly twice as many votes.

Ironically, those people back then who thought that being the capital meant good business were proved right. Today, the government employs 30% missha signature bb cream review the city’s workers. It has a modest 150,000 people, but is known across the state as a great destination for skiing and wine.

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Источник: https://www.sporcle.com/blog/2018/02/why-is-salem-the-capital-of-oregon/

Salem, Oregon

00-salem-capitol-jonquilSalem, Oregon

  • Oregon became a state February 14, 1859, the 33rd state admitted to the Union.
  • Salem became state capital 1859
  • Established: 1850
  • Name Origin: Possibilities include named for Salem, Massachusetts, or last letters of “Jerusalem,” or version of “Shalom” for peace

William Willson filed plats in 1850 for the main part of the city, and suggested the name Salem as an Anglicized version of the word “Shalom.” David Leslie, President of the town’s Trustees, suggested using the last five letters of “Jerusalem.” Leslie was educated in Salem, Massachusetts, which also may have influenced his suggestion.

The gold-leafed bronze statue on top of Oregon’s capitol symbolizes the rugged pioneers who carved Oregon out of the wilderness. But the building, completed in 1938, is a modern Greek-Art Deco design, matched by four more state buildings in Capitol Mall. On the grounds are many statuary and monuments.

Salem is in the beautiful Willamette Valley; Willamette University, the oldest institution of higher learning west of the Missouri River, is here too; on campus visit many historic buildings and the Mark Hatfield Library.

At Mission Mill Village fleece is turned into fabric in the Woolen Mill Museum; several parsonages interpret missionary family life of the 1800’s. Deepwood Estate and the Bush House are authentic Victorian mansions open for tours; Honeywood Winery is Oregon’s oldest producing winery.

Key Words: pioneers, Willamette, woolen, missionary, winery

Things To Love About Salem

The freshness of the air, the farms surrounding everything, the milk, the cheese, the golden-hearted people there, the independent spirit of the pioneers, the love of place. The rhodies everywhere you look.

Blogs To Read About Salem

Shut The Front Door!https://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2044

Sunday Churchhttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2070

Once Upon A Timehttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2090

When Babies Are Bornhttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2103

That Very Pleased Lookhttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2175

Tell Me About Ithttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2109

Like Little Bear’s Porridgehttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2131

Go Tell Aunt Rhodiehttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2155

Elephant DNAhttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2183

The Wheels On The Bushttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2200

Cut The Cheesehttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2216

And The Beat Goes Onhttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2495

Capital City Basics

  • Population: 154,637, 26th largest in population of the 50 capital cities
  • Population density: 3,229 persons per square mile
  • Land area of city: 47.9 square miles
  • Elevation: 154 feet, 38th highest in elevation of the 50 capital cities
  • Normal high/low temps: January 48/35, July 82/53. Annual rainfall: 40 inches
  • Time Zone: Pacific
  • Water near: Willamette River
  • Mountains near: Cascade Mountains, Coast Range. Mount Hood in the northern part of the state is the highest point in Oregon at 11,249 feet.
  • Miles to three nearest State Capitals: Olympia, WA 161; Boise, ID 454; Sacramento, CA 536
  • Miles to National Capitol in Washington, DC: 2,856

Population Statistics from US 2010 Census

  • 154,637           Population
  • 25.2%              Under 18
  • 12.0%              Over 65
  • 2.7%                Asian
  • 1.5%                 Black
  • 20.3%              Hispanic/Latino
  • 1.5%                 Native Alaskan or American Indian
  • 0.9%                Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander
  • 70.7%              White

Education Statistics from US 2010 Census

  • 20.9%              English Not Spoken at Home
  • 85.6%              High School Graduate
  • 25.9%              Bachelor’s Degree or Higher

Economic Statistics from US 2010 Census

  • 17.4%               Below Poverty Level
  • $23,162           Per Capita Income
  • $44,226          Median Household Income
  • $199,500        Median Value of Home
  • 56.6%              Home Ownership

City: http://www.cityofsalem.net/Pages/default.aspx

Visitors: http://www.travelsalem.com/

 

 

 

 

Источник: https://capitalcitiesusa.org/?page_id=495

File:Capital city of Oregon, Salem. LOC 75694941.jpg

DescriptionCapital city of Oregon, Salem. LOC 75694941.jpg
English: Perspective map not drawn to scale. Bird's-eye-view. LC Panoramic maps (2nd ed.), 726 Available also through the Library of Congress Web site as a raster image. Includes illus. AACR2: 651/1
TitleCapital city of Oregon, Salem.Shelf IDG4294.S3A3 1905 .K6Date 1905Sourcehttps://www.loc.gov/item/75694941/Author Koppe, E.; Fromm, Ch.; Mutual L. And Lith Co.Permission
(Reusing this file)LocationUnited States · Salem · OregonPart ofAmerican Memory · Cities And Towns · Catalog · Panoramic Maps · Geography And Map DivisionSubjectUnited States · Salem (Or.) · Salem · Aerial Views · Oregon
Источник: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Capital_city_of_Oregon,_Salem._LOC_75694941.jpg

State Capitals and Largest Cities

Here's alist of allthe state capitals and largest cities in the United States. The list includes some fun facts about each capital. Here's a national fun fact: New York City was the first capital of the United States once the Constitution was ratified.

State capitals are often centrally located in a state. Having one location to govern from can facilitate the processes of providing government functions and rules. As you can see below, the largest city is sometimes the capital city, but not always.

Looking to get around some major cities? Maybe you can check out our list of the best electric skateboards for some locomotive assistance.

1. Alabama

Montgomery is the capital of Alabama

State Capital: Montgomery Largest City: Birmingham

Montgomery is the site of many landmark civil rights events, like the Montgomery bus boycotts throughout 1955 and 1956 and the Selma-to-Montgomery March for voting rights in 1965.

The nation?s oldest baseball field, Rickwood Field, which opened in 1910, is located in Birmingham.

2. Alaska

State Capital: Juneau Largest City: Anchorage

If you're thinking of going on a road trip directly to Juneau, note what is the capital city of oregon can't drive intothe city.You can only fly or ferry in.

Forty-one percent of the state's population lives in Anchorage.

3. Arizona

State Capital: Phoenix Largest City: Phoenix

Phoenix is the most populous state capital with approximately 1.5 million people living there.According to the National Climatic Data Center, the sun shines on Phoenix for 85 percent of its daylight hours.

4. Arkansas

State Capital: Little Rock Largest City: Little Rock

Little Rock became the capital of the territory of Arkansas in 1821. The name ?little rock? comes from the French explorer Bernard de la Harpe. In 1722, he saw rock formations what is the capital city of oregon out from the Ouachita Mountains and named one groupthe big rock and the other the little rock.

5. California

State Capital: Sacramento Largest City: Los Angeles

Sacramento is California's sixth capital since 1854.

You can visit the memorial of Senator Capitol Kitty, a stray cat that lived at the state capital for 13 years.

Los Angeles has more than 3.9 million residents.

6. Colorado

State Capital: Denver Largest City: Denver

Denver became the territorial capital in 1867. Denver is 155 square miles and has a population of 663,862.Denver is exactly one mile above sea level, giving it the nickname, the Mile High City.

7. Connecticut

State Capital: Hartford Largest City: Bridgeport

Hartford became the sole capital of Connecticut in 1875. Originally, both New Haven and Hartford were capital cities, starting in 1701.

Bridgeport Harbor is one of three deep-water ports in the state. Bridgeport has just over 145,000 residents.

8. Delaware

State Capital: Dover Largest City: Wilmington

In Dover, the old statehouse what is the capital city of oregon the green (built in part in 1722 as the county courthouse) has been the capitol building since 1777.

Wilmington is located halfway between New York City and Washington, D.C. and has just over 71,000 residents.

9. Florida

State Capital: Tallahassee Largest City: Jacksonville

Tallahassee became the capital of Florida in 1823. The founder of Famous Amos Cookies, Wally Amos, was born and raised in Tallahassee.

Jacksonville is the largest city by area in the continental United States with over 840 square miles.

10. Georgia

Atlanta is the capital of Georgia

State Capital: Atlanta Largest City: Atlanta

In 1877, Atlanta became the capital of Georgia, succeeding Milledgeville, which was the state?s fourth capital. Approximately 17 Fortune 500 companies (including Coca-Cola) call Atlanta home.

11. Hawaii

State Capital: Honolulu Largest City: Honolulu

Honolulu has the only royal palace in the U.S. TheIolani Palacewas the official residence for the Hawaiian monarchs who lived on the estate before Queen Lili'uokalani was overthrown in 1891.According to the 2010 Census, Honolulu has more than 337,000 residents.

12. Idaho

State Capital: Boise Largest City: Boise

Boise became the capital of the territory of Idaho in 1864. Approximately228,900 people live there. In Boise, it's a law that "Residents may not fish from a giraffe?s back."

13. Illinois

State Capital: Springfield Largest City: Chicago

President AbrahamLincoln spentmuch of his life in Springfield and youcan visit his housethere.

Chicago was a small town when Springfield became the state capital in 1834 and now it boasts 2.7 million residents.

14. Indiana

State Capital: Indianapolis Largest City: Indianapolis

Indianapolis became the state capital in 1825. Currently, it has more than 864,000 residents. Did you know that in Indiana, it's illegal to collect rags on Sundays? It's also illegal to ride over 10 miles per hour on your horse.

15. Iowa

State Capital: Des Moines Largest City: Des Moines

Des What is the capital city of oregon became the capital in 1857 -- the previous capital was Iowa City. Des Moines suffered several floods in the 1950s, and despite flood control measures constructed on the Des Moines River, was again inundated in 1993.

16. Kansas

State Capital: Topeka Largest City: Wichita

Topeka has served as Kansas?s capital since it became a state in 1861. The Topeka Train Robbersis the city's official baseball team. The mascot's name is MacBurgular.

Wichita has almost 390,000 residents.

17. Kentucky

State Capital: Frankfort Largest City: Louisville

In 1792, the year Kentucky became the 15th state, Frankfort became its capital. Frankfort native, George Graham Vest, is best known for coining the phrase "dog is a man's best friend."

The Louisville Metro population is 1.2 million.

18. Louisiana

State Capital: Baton Rouge Largest City: New Orleans

The capital of Louisiana moved around quite a bit. New Orleans had the title twice before the titlesettled federal reserve bank services routing number lookup Baton Rouge in 1879.

New Orleans has a population of more than 384,000 residents.

19. Maine

Augusta is the capital of Maine

State Capital: Augusta Largest City: Portland

Augusta was named the state capital in 1827. Woodrow Wilson grew up in Augusta and you can still visit his boyhood home today.

Portland?s population is just under 67,000 residents.

20. Maryland

State Capital: Annapolis Largest City: Baltimore

From November 26, 1783, to August 13, 1784, Annapolis was the location of the nation?s capital. The statehouse where George Washington resigned as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army in 1783 (and where the treaty that ended the Revolutionary War was ratified in 1784) still stands in Annapolis.

Baltimore has a population of nearly 622,000 residents.

21. Massachusetts

State Capital: Boston Largest City: Boston

There was once a flood of molasses in Boston thatkilled21 people. Some claim that parts of Boston's North End still smelllike molasses on a hot day.

22. Michigan

State Capital: Lansing Largest City: Detroit

Lansing is the only state capital that isnot the county seat.

Detroit had a population of just over 1 million residents in 1990 and now has just over 680,000 residents.

23. Minnesota

State Capital:St. Paul Largest City: Minneapolis

In 1849, St. Paul was named the capital of the Minnesota territory.

Minneapolis is one of the top 50 largest cities in the country, with 407,207 residents. The capitol building, completed in 1904 and designed by CassGilbert, was also modeled after St. Peter's Basilicain Rome.

24. Mississippi

Jackson is the capital of Mississippi

State Capital: Jackson Largest City: Jackson

Jackson was named after President Andrew Jackson and was chosen as the capital in 1821. Pinnacle bank atm near me has a population of approximately 169,000 residents. The first Republican party convention was held in Jackson on July 6, 1854.

25. Missouri

State Capital: Jefferson City Largest City: Kansas City

Jefferson City was specifically designed to be the state capital.

26. Montana

State Capital: Helena Largest City: Billings

Helena was founded after the discovery of gold (1864) in Last Chance Gulch (now Helena's main street) and grew rapidly. As the area's stores of gold and silver were depleted, other minerals, including copper, leadand zinc were discovered and exploited.

Billings boasts a population of more than 110,300 residents.

27. Nebraska

State Capital: Lincoln Largest City: Omaha



In 1867, the village of Lancaster (renamed Lincoln) became the state capital. Lincoln is the home of the National Museum of Roller Skating.

28. Nevada

State Capital: Carson City Largest City: Las Vegas

Carson City became the capital orange county food bank the Nevada Territory in 1861 and stayed its capital when it became a state.

Las Vegas has approximately 613,600 residents and the popular tourist destination isoften thought to be the state capital.

29. New Hampshire

State Capital: Concord Largest City: Manchester

Concord has been the capital city of New Hampshire since 1808. Levi Hutchins of Concord invented the first alarm clockin 1787.

Manchester has approximately 110,506 residents.

30. New Jersey

State Capital: Trenton Largest City: Newark

Trenton became New Jersey's capital in November 1790. Trenton's pottery industry dates back to colonial times.

Newark has approximately 281,764 residents and celebrated its 350th birthday in 2016.

31. New Mexico

State Capital: Santa Fe Largest City: Albuquerque

Santa Fe became the capital of the Territory of New Mexicoin 1851 and remained its capital when it achieved statehood in 1912.

Albuquerque has approximately 559,277 residents.

32. New York

State Capital: Albany Largest City: New York City

Kingston was the first capital in New York, until the British burned it down in 1777. The title then passed over the Albany 20 years later in 1797.

New York City, nicknamed ?The Big Apple,? is home to more than 8.5 million residents and is the largest city in the United States.

33. North Carolina

Raleigh is the capital of North Carolina

State Capital: Raleigh Largest City: Charlotte

Like Jefferson City, Raleigh (designated the capital in 1792) was also planned and built to be the capital city.

Charlotte has approximately842,051 residents.

34. North Dakota

State Capital: Bismarck Largest City: Fargo

Bismarck became the capital of the Dakota Territory in 1883 and stayed its capital when it became a state in 1889.

Fargo has approximately 120,762 residents.

35. Ohio

State Capital: Columbus Largest City: Columbus

Columbus was laid out as the state capital in 1812 but did not take over the government from Chillicothe until 1816.

36. Oklahoma

State Capital: Oklahoma City Largest City: Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City became the capital in 1910. Today, the city has a population of approximately638,367 residents.

Oklahoma City was the first city to install parking meters.

37. Oregon

State Capital: Salem Largest City: Portland

Salem was chosen as the capital of the territory of Oregon in 1851 and later designated the state capital in 1855. Salem's Waldo Park is only 12 by 20 feet and is one of the smallest parks in nation.

38. Pennsylvania

State Capital: Harrisburg Largest City: Philadelphia

Harrisburg was named the capital of Pennsylvania in 1812. The state capital building in Harrisburg is modeled after St. Peter's Basilicain the Vatican City.

In 2014, Philadelphia was the fifth largest city in the U.S., with more than 1.5 million residents.

39. Rhode Island

State Capital: Providence Largest City: Providence

Providence was founded in 1636, which makes it one of the oldest cities in the United States. Rhode Island originally had five capital cities, and then, eventually two--Newport and Providence. Providence became the sole capital of the state in 1900.

In Providence it is illegal to wear transparent clothing. It is also illegal to selltoothpaste and a toothbrush to the same person on a Sunday.

40. South Carolina

State Capital: Columbia Largest City: Columbia

Columbia became the capital in 1786. The World's Largest Fire Hydrant resides in Columbia.

41. South Dakota

State Capital: Pierre Largest City: Sioux Falls

Pierre became the permanent capital of South Dakota in 1890.Sioux Falls has just over 174,360 residents.

42. Tennessee

Nashville is the capital of Tennessee

State Capital: Nashville Largest City: Memphis

Nashville -- nicknamed the City of Music -- was the capital of Tennessee twice. The city was first the capital from 1812 to 1817 and then in 1826, Nashville became the permanent capital of the state.

Currently, What is the capital city of oregon nearly 653,000 residents.

43. Texas

State Capital: Austin Largest City: Houston

In 1839, Austin (once named Waterloo) became the capital of Texas. In 1842, the capital moved to Houston and then in 1844, Austin again became the what is the capital city of oregon has 2.3 million residents.

44. Utah

State Capital: Salt Lake City Largest City: Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City was capital of the territory of Utah in 1856, and in 1896, it became the capital of the new state. Salt Lake City has 193,744 residents. The largest genealogical libraryin the world is in Salt Lake City. The Family History Library is open to the public and free of charge.

45. Vermont

State Capital: Montpelier Largest City: Burlington

Montpelier became the state capital in 1805.It has the smallest population (7,535) of all the state capitals.

Burlington has just over 42,000 residents and is located on the eastern shore ofLake Champlain.

46. Virginia

State Capital: Richmond Largest City: Virginia Beach

Richmond replaced Williamsburg as the state capital in 1779. In Richmond it is illegal to flip a coin in a restaurant to see who will pay for coffee.Virginia Beach has 452,602 residents.

47. Washington

State Capital: Olympia Largest City: Seattle

Olympia was the state capital before it was even a town. Olympia was named the provisional capital in 1853 and confirmed as the official capital in 1855.Olympia wasn't incorporated as a town until 1859.

Seattle has 704,352 residents and is known for being the headquarters ofStarbucks, Microsoft andAmazon.

48. West Virginia

State Capital: Charleston Largest City: Charleston

Charleston became the state?s capital in 1877. The first capital building stood for 36 years before a fire destroyed it in 1921. There was also ammunition stored on the top floor of the building. The fire set off the ammunition, causing a panic from the the onlookers. During the event, two men were arrested for stealing a fire truck.

49. Wisconsin

State Capital: Madison Largest City: Milwaukee

Madison became the capital of the state in 1838. The official bird of Madison is the plastic pink flamingo.

50. Wyoming

State Capital: Cheyenne Largest City: Cheyenne

In 1890, Wyoming was admitted to the union and Cheyenne became its capital. Every year since 1897, Cheyenne has hostedthe Frontier Days Festival to celebrate the city's roots in the Old West.Cheyenne has just over 64,000 residents.

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2010 figures and 2014, 2016 population estimates.

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Источник: https://www.infoplease.com/us/states/state-capitals-and-largest-cities

47Images

Oregon State Capitol Cherry Blossom Day Capitol Mall with.

Salem, Oregon, USA - March 19, 2016: The Oregon State Capitol as viewed looking across the Capitol Mall. This photo taken during the Cherry Blossom Day at the Oregon State Capitol. This free public event was on Saturday, March 19, 2016. Activities were outdoors in the Capitol Mall with the Blooming Cherry Trees and inside the Capitol building. People can be seen enjoying the beautiful spring day and the events. A large fountain is near the center of the photo. This open area is an Oregon State Park.

Senate Chamber Oregon State Capitol

Salem, Oregon, United States - April 23, 2012. State Senate Chamber of the Oregon state capitol building in Salem, Oregon. It is composed of 30 members and part of the Oregon Legislative Assembly.

Cherry Blossom Day Oregon State Capitol Looking Across Capitol.

Salem, Oregon, USA - March 19, 2016: The Oregon State Capitol viewed looking across the Capitol Mall. This photo taken during the Cherry Blossom Day at the Oregon State Capitol. This free public event was on Saturday, March 19, 2016. Activities were outdoors in the Capitol Mall with the Blooming Cherry Trees and inside the Capitol building. People can be seen enjoying the beautiful spring day and the events.

Oregon State Capitol Cherry Blossom Day Looking Across Capitol.

Salem, Oregon, USA - March 19, 2016: The Oregon State Capitol as viewed looking across the Capitol Mall. This photo taken during the Cherry Blossom Day at the Oregon State Capitol. This free public event was on Saturday, March 19, 2016. Activities were outdoors in the Capitol Mall with the Blooming Cherry Trees and inside the Capitol building. People can be seen enjoying the beautiful spring day and the events. This open area is an Oregon State Park.

Oregon State Capitol Cherry Blossom Day from Across Capitol Mall

Salem, Oregon, USA - March 19, 2016: Part of the Oregon State Capitol as viewed looking across the Capitol Mall. This photo taken during the Cherry Blossom Day at the Oregon State Capitol. This free public event was on Saturday, March 19, 2016. Activities were outdoors in the Capitol Mall with the Blooming Cherry Trees and inside the Capitol building. People can be seen enjoying the beautiful spring day and the events. This open area is an Oregon State Park.

Источник: https://www.istockphoto.com/photos/oregon-capital-cities-salem-oregon-state-capitol-building
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State Capitals and Largest Cities

Here's alist of allthe state capitals and largest cities in the United States. The list includes some fun facts about each capital. Here's a national fun fact: New York City was the first capital of the United States once the Constitution was ratified.

State capitals are often centrally located in a state. Having one location to govern from can facilitate the processes of providing government functions and rules. As you can see below, the largest city is sometimes the capital city, but not always.

Looking to get around some major cities? Maybe you can check out our list of the best electric skateboards for some locomotive assistance.

1. Alabama

Montgomery is the capital of Alabama

State Capital: Montgomery Largest City: Birmingham

Montgomery is the site of many landmark civil rights events, like the Montgomery bus boycotts throughout 1955 and 1956 and the Selma-to-Montgomery March for voting rights in 1965.

The nation?s oldest baseball field, Rickwood Field, which opened in 1910, is located in Birmingham.

2. Alaska

State Capital: Juneau Largest City: Anchorage

If you're thinking of going on a road trip directly to Juneau, note you can't drive intothe city.You can only fly or ferry in.

Forty-one percent of the state's population lives in Anchorage.

3. Arizona

State Capital: Phoenix Largest City: Phoenix

Phoenix is the most populous state capital with approximately 1.5 million people living there.According to the National Climatic Data Center, the sun shines on Phoenix for 85 percent of its daylight hours.

4. Arkansas

State Capital: Little Rock Largest City: Little Rock

Little Rock became the capital of the territory of Arkansas in 1821. The name ?little rock? comes from the French explorer Bernard de la Harpe. In 1722, he saw rock formations jutting out from the Ouachita Mountains and named one groupthe big rock and the other the little rock.

5. California

State Capital: Sacramento Largest City: Los Angeles

Sacramento is California's sixth capital since 1854.

You can visit the memorial of Senator Capitol Kitty, a stray cat that lived at the state capital for 13 years.

Los Angeles has more than 3.9 million residents.

6. Colorado

State Capital: Denver Largest City: Denver

Denver became the territorial capital in 1867. Denver is 155 square miles and has a population of 663,862.Denver is exactly one mile above sea level, giving it the nickname, the Mile High City.

7. Connecticut

State Capital: Hartford Largest City: Bridgeport

Hartford became the sole capital of Connecticut in 1875. Originally, both New Haven and Hartford were capital cities, starting in 1701.

Bridgeport Harbor is one of three deep-water ports in the state. Bridgeport has just over 145,000 residents.

8. Delaware

State Capital: Dover Largest City: Wilmington

In Dover, the old statehouse on the green (built in part in 1722 as the county courthouse) has been the capitol building since 1777.

Wilmington is located halfway between New York City and Washington, D.C. and has just over 71,000 residents.

9. Florida

State Capital: Tallahassee Largest City: Jacksonville

Tallahassee became the capital of Florida in 1823. The founder of Famous Amos Cookies, Wally Amos, was born and raised in Tallahassee.

Jacksonville is the largest city by area in the continental United States with over 840 square miles.

10. Georgia

Atlanta is the capital of Georgia

State Capital: Atlanta Largest City: Atlanta

In 1877, Atlanta became the capital of Georgia, succeeding Milledgeville, which was the state?s fourth capital. Approximately 17 Fortune 500 companies (including Coca-Cola) call Atlanta home.

11. Hawaii

State Capital: Honolulu Largest City: Honolulu

Honolulu has the only royal palace in the U.S. TheIolani Palacewas the official residence for the Hawaiian monarchs who lived on the estate before Queen Lili'uokalani was overthrown in 1891.According to the 2010 Census, Honolulu has more than 337,000 residents.

12. Idaho

State Capital: Boise Largest City: Boise

Boise became the capital of the territory of Idaho in 1864. Approximately228,900 people live there. In Boise, it's a law that "Residents may not fish from a giraffe?s back."

13. Illinois

State Capital: Springfield Largest City: Chicago

President AbrahamLincoln spentmuch of his life in Springfield and youcan visit his housethere.

Chicago was a small town when Springfield became the state capital in 1834 and now it boasts 2.7 million residents.

14. Indiana

State Capital: Indianapolis Largest City: Indianapolis

Indianapolis became the state capital in 1825. Currently, it has more than 864,000 residents. Did you know that in Indiana, it's illegal to collect rags on Sundays? It's also illegal to ride over 10 miles per hour on your horse.

15. Iowa

State Capital: Des Moines Largest City: Des Moines

Des Moines became the capital in 1857 -- the previous capital was Iowa City. Des Moines suffered several floods in the 1950s, and despite flood control measures constructed on the Des Moines River, was again inundated in 1993.

16. Kansas

State Capital: Topeka Largest City: Wichita

Topeka has served as Kansas?s capital since it became a state in 1861. The Topeka Train Robbersis the city's official baseball team. The mascot's name is MacBurgular.

Wichita has almost 390,000 residents.

17. Kentucky

State Capital: Frankfort Largest City: Louisville

In 1792, the year Kentucky became the 15th state, Frankfort became its capital. Frankfort native, George Graham Vest, is best known for coining the phrase "dog is a man's best friend."

The Louisville Metro population is 1.2 million.

18. Louisiana

State Capital: Baton Rouge Largest City: New Orleans

The capital of Louisiana moved around quite a bit. New Orleans had the title twice before the titlesettled on Baton Rouge in 1879.

New Orleans has a population of more than 384,000 residents.

19. Maine

Augusta is the capital of Maine

State Capital: Augusta Largest City: Portland

Augusta was named the state capital in 1827. Woodrow Wilson grew up in Augusta and you can still visit his boyhood home today.

Portland?s population is just under 67,000 residents.

20. Maryland

State Capital: Annapolis Largest City: Baltimore

From November 26, 1783, to August 13, 1784, Annapolis was the location of the nation?s capital. The statehouse where George Washington resigned as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army in 1783 (and where the treaty that ended the Revolutionary War was ratified in 1784) still stands in Annapolis.

Baltimore has a population of nearly 622,000 residents.

21. Massachusetts

State Capital: Boston Largest City: Boston

There was once a flood of molasses in Boston thatkilled21 people. Some claim that parts of Boston's North End still smelllike molasses on a hot day.

22. Michigan

State Capital: Lansing Largest City: Detroit

Lansing is the only state capital that isnot the county seat.

Detroit had a population of just over 1 million residents in 1990 and now has just over 680,000 residents.

23. Minnesota

State Capital:St. Paul Largest City: Minneapolis

In 1849, St. Paul was named the capital of the Minnesota territory.

Minneapolis is one of the top 50 largest cities in the country, with 407,207 residents. The capitol building, completed in 1904 and designed by CassGilbert, was also modeled after St. Peter's Basilicain Rome.

24. Mississippi

Jackson is the capital of Mississippi

State Capital: Jackson Largest City: Jackson

Jackson was named after President Andrew Jackson and was chosen as the capital in 1821. Jackson has a population of approximately 169,000 residents. The first Republican party convention was held in Jackson on July 6, 1854.

25. Missouri

State Capital: Jefferson City Largest City: Kansas City

Jefferson City was specifically designed to be the state capital.

26. Montana

State Capital: Helena Largest City: Billings

Helena was founded after the discovery of gold (1864) in Last Chance Gulch (now Helena's main street) and grew rapidly. As the area's stores of gold and silver were depleted, other minerals, including copper, leadand zinc were discovered and exploited.

Billings boasts a population of more than 110,300 residents.

27. Nebraska

State Capital: Lincoln Largest City: Omaha



In 1867, the village of Lancaster (renamed Lincoln) became the state capital. Lincoln is the home of the National Museum of Roller Skating.

28. Nevada

State Capital: Carson City Largest City: Las Vegas

Carson City became the capital of the Nevada Territory in 1861 and stayed its capital when it became a state.

Las Vegas has approximately 613,600 residents and the popular tourist destination isoften thought to be the state capital.

29. New Hampshire

State Capital: Concord Largest City: Manchester

Concord has been the capital city of New Hampshire since 1808. Levi Hutchins of Concord invented the first alarm clockin 1787.

Manchester has approximately 110,506 residents.

30. New Jersey

State Capital: Trenton Largest City: Newark

Trenton became New Jersey's capital in November 1790. Trenton's pottery industry dates back to colonial times.

Newark has approximately 281,764 residents and celebrated its 350th birthday in 2016.

31. New Mexico

State Capital: Santa Fe Largest City: Albuquerque

Santa Fe became the capital of the Territory of New Mexicoin 1851 and remained its capital when it achieved statehood in 1912.

Albuquerque has approximately 559,277 residents.

32. New York

State Capital: Albany Largest City: New York City

Kingston was the first capital in New York, until the British burned it down in 1777. The title then passed over the Albany 20 years later in 1797.

New York City, nicknamed ?The Big Apple,? is home to more than 8.5 million residents and is the largest city in the United States.

33. North Carolina

Raleigh is the capital of North Carolina

State Capital: Raleigh Largest City: Charlotte

Like Jefferson City, Raleigh (designated the capital in 1792) was also planned and built to be the capital city.

Charlotte has approximately842,051 residents.

34. North Dakota

State Capital: Bismarck Largest City: Fargo

Bismarck became the capital of the Dakota Territory in 1883 and stayed its capital when it became a state in 1889.

Fargo has approximately 120,762 residents.

35. Ohio

State Capital: Columbus Largest City: Columbus

Columbus was laid out as the state capital in 1812 but did not take over the government from Chillicothe until 1816.

36. Oklahoma

State Capital: Oklahoma City Largest City: Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City became the capital in 1910. Today, the city has a population of approximately638,367 residents.

Oklahoma City was the first city to install parking meters.

37. Oregon

State Capital: Salem Largest City: Portland

Salem was chosen as the capital of the territory of Oregon in 1851 and later designated the state capital in 1855. Salem's Waldo Park is only 12 by 20 feet and is one of the smallest parks in nation.

38. Pennsylvania

State Capital: Harrisburg Largest City: Philadelphia

Harrisburg was named the capital of Pennsylvania in 1812. The state capital building in Harrisburg is modeled after St. Peter's Basilicain the Vatican City.

In 2014, Philadelphia was the fifth largest city in the U.S., with more than 1.5 million residents.

39. Rhode Island

State Capital: Providence Largest City: Providence

Providence was founded in 1636, which makes it one of the oldest cities in the United States. Rhode Island originally had five capital cities, and then, eventually two--Newport and Providence. Providence became the sole capital of the state in 1900.

In Providence it is illegal to wear transparent clothing. It is also illegal to selltoothpaste and a toothbrush to the same person on a Sunday.

40. South Carolina

State Capital: Columbia Largest City: Columbia

Columbia became the capital in 1786. The World's Largest Fire Hydrant resides in Columbia.

41. South Dakota

State Capital: Pierre Largest City: Sioux Falls

Pierre became the permanent capital of South Dakota in 1890.Sioux Falls has just over 174,360 residents.

42. Tennessee

Nashville is the capital of Tennessee

State Capital: Nashville Largest City: Memphis

Nashville -- nicknamed the City of Music -- was the capital of Tennessee twice. The city was first the capital from 1812 to 1817 and then in 1826, Nashville became the permanent capital of the state.

Currently, Memphishas nearly 653,000 residents.

43. Texas

State Capital: Austin Largest City: Houston

In 1839, Austin (once named Waterloo) became the capital of Texas. In 1842, the capital moved to Houston and then in 1844, Austin again became the capital.

Houston has 2.3 million residents.

44. Utah

State Capital: Salt Lake City Largest City: Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City was capital of the territory of Utah in 1856, and in 1896, it became the capital of the new state. Salt Lake City has 193,744 residents. The largest genealogical libraryin the world is in Salt Lake City. The Family History Library is open to the public and free of charge.

45. Vermont

State Capital: Montpelier Largest City: Burlington

Montpelier became the state capital in 1805.It has the smallest population (7,535) of all the state capitals.

Burlington has just over 42,000 residents and is located on the eastern shore ofLake Champlain.

46. Virginia

State Capital: Richmond Largest City: Virginia Beach

Richmond replaced Williamsburg as the state capital in 1779. In Richmond it is illegal to flip a coin in a restaurant to see who will pay for coffee.Virginia Beach has 452,602 residents.

47. Washington

State Capital: Olympia Largest City: Seattle

Olympia was the state capital before it was even a town. Olympia was named the provisional capital in 1853 and confirmed as the official capital in 1855.Olympia wasn't incorporated as a town until 1859.

Seattle has 704,352 residents and is known for being the headquarters ofStarbucks, Microsoft andAmazon.

48. West Virginia

State Capital: Charleston Largest City: Charleston

Charleston became the state?s capital in 1877. The first capital building stood for 36 years before a fire destroyed it in 1921. There was also ammunition stored on the top floor of the building. The fire set off the ammunition, causing a panic from the the onlookers. During the event, two men were arrested for stealing a fire truck.

49. Wisconsin

State Capital: Madison Largest City: Milwaukee

Madison became the capital of the state in 1838. The official bird of Madison is the plastic pink flamingo.

50. Wyoming

State Capital: Cheyenne Largest City: Cheyenne

In 1890, Wyoming was admitted to the union and Cheyenne became its capital. Every year since 1897, Cheyenne has hostedthe Frontier Days Festival to celebrate the city's roots in the Old West.Cheyenne has just over 64,000 residents.

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2010 figures and 2014, 2016 population estimates.

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Источник: https://www.infoplease.com/us/states/state-capitals-and-largest-cities

File:Capital city of Oregon, Salem. LOC 75694941.jpg

DescriptionCapital city of Oregon, Salem. LOC 75694941.jpg
English: Perspective map not drawn to scale. Bird's-eye-view. LC Panoramic maps (2nd ed.), 726 Available also through the Library of Congress Web site as a raster image. Includes illus. AACR2: 651/1
TitleCapital city of Oregon, Salem.Shelf IDG4294.S3A3 1905 .K6Date 1905Sourcehttps://www.loc.gov/item/75694941/Author Koppe, E.; Fromm, Ch.; Mutual L. And Lith Co.Permission
(Reusing this file)LocationUnited States · Salem · OregonPart ofAmerican Memory · Cities And Towns · Catalog · Panoramic Maps · Geography And Map DivisionSubjectUnited States · Salem (Or.) · Salem · Aerial Views · Oregon
Источник: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Capital_city_of_Oregon,_Salem._LOC_75694941.jpg

47Images

Oregon State Capitol Cherry Blossom Day Capitol Mall with...

Salem, Oregon, USA - March 19, 2016: The Oregon State Capitol as viewed looking across the Capitol Mall. This photo taken during the Cherry Blossom Day at the Oregon State Capitol. This free public event was on Saturday, March 19, 2016. Activities were outdoors in the Capitol Mall with the Blooming Cherry Trees and inside the Capitol building. People can be seen enjoying the beautiful spring day and the events. A large fountain is near the center of the photo. This open area is an Oregon State Park.

Senate Chamber Oregon State Capitol

Salem, Oregon, United States - April 23, 2012. State Senate Chamber of the Oregon state capitol building in Salem, Oregon. It is composed of 30 members and part of the Oregon Legislative Assembly.

Cherry Blossom Day Oregon State Capitol Looking Across Capitol...

Salem, Oregon, USA - March 19, 2016: The Oregon State Capitol viewed looking across the Capitol Mall. This photo taken during the Cherry Blossom Day at the Oregon State Capitol. This free public event was on Saturday, March 19, 2016. Activities were outdoors in the Capitol Mall with the Blooming Cherry Trees and inside the Capitol building. People can be seen enjoying the beautiful spring day and the events.

Oregon State Capitol Cherry Blossom Day Looking Across Capitol...

Salem, Oregon, USA - March 19, 2016: The Oregon State Capitol as viewed looking across the Capitol Mall. This photo taken during the Cherry Blossom Day at the Oregon State Capitol. This free public event was on Saturday, March 19, 2016. Activities were outdoors in the Capitol Mall with the Blooming Cherry Trees and inside the Capitol building. People can be seen enjoying the beautiful spring day and the events. This open area is an Oregon State Park.

Oregon State Capitol Cherry Blossom Day from Across Capitol Mall

Salem, Oregon, USA - March 19, 2016: Part of the Oregon State Capitol as viewed looking across the Capitol Mall. This photo taken during the Cherry Blossom Day at the Oregon State Capitol. This free public event was on Saturday, March 19, 2016. Activities were outdoors in the Capitol Mall with the Blooming Cherry Trees and inside the Capitol building. People can be seen enjoying the beautiful spring day and the events. This open area is an Oregon State Park.

Источник: https://www.istockphoto.com/photos/oregon-capital-cities-salem-oregon-state-capitol-building

Salem, Oregon

State capital city in Oregon, United States

Salem (SAY-ləm) is the capital of the U.S. state of Oregon, and the county seat of Marion County. It is located in the center of the Willamette Valley alongside the Willamette River, which runs north through the city. The river forms the boundary between Marion and Polk counties, and the city neighborhood of West Salem is in Polk County. Salem was founded in 1842, became the capital of the Oregon Territory in 1851, and was incorporated in 1857.

Salem had a population of 174,365 in 2019,[7] making it the second-largest city in the state after Portland. Salem is a little under an hour's driving distance away from Portland.[8] Salem is the principal city of the Salem Metropolitan Statistical Area, a metropolitan area that covers Marion and Polk counties[9] and had a combined population of 390,738 at the 2010 census. A 2019 estimate placed the metropolitan population at 400,408, the state's second largest.[10] This area is, in turn, part of the Portland-Vancouver-SalemCombined Statistical Area.

The campuses of Willamette University and Chemeketa Community College lie within the city limits of Salem, and the campus of Corban University is just outside the city in unincorporated Marion County. The State of Oregon is the largest public employer in the city, and Salem Health is the largest private employer. Transportation includes public transit from Cherriots (legally known as Salem Area Mass Transit District), Amtrak service, and non-commercial air travel at McNary Field. Major roads include Interstate 5, Oregon Route 99E, and Oregon Route 22, which connects West Salem across the Willamette River via the Marion Street and Center Street bridges.

History[edit]

Origin of name[edit]

The Native Americans who inhabited the central Willamette Valley at first European contact, the Kalapuya, called the area Chim-i-ki-ti, which means "meeting or resting place" in the Central Kalapuya language (Santiam).[11] When the Methodist Mission moved to the area, they called the new establishment Chemeketa; although it was more widely known as the Mill, because of its situation on Mill Creek.[12] When the Oregon Institute was established, the community became known as the Institute.[12]

When the institute was dissolved, the trustees decided to lay out a town site on the Institute lands.[12] Some possible sources for the name "Salem" include William H. Willson, who in 1850 and 1851 filed the plans for the main part of the city, and suggested adopting an Anglicized version of the Biblical Hebrew word "שָׁלוֹם, Shalom", meaning "peace" (as well as "hello" and "goodbye").[12][13] The Reverend David Leslie, President of the town's Trustees, also wanted a Biblical name, and suggested using the last five letters of "Jerusalem".[13] Or, the town may be named after Salem, Massachusetts, where Leslie was educated. There were many names suggested, and even after the change to Salem, some people, such as Asahel Bush (editor of the Oregon Statesman), believed the name should be changed back to Chemeketa.[14] The Vern Miller Civic Center, which houses the city offices and library, has a public space dedicated as the Peace Plaza in recognition of the names by which the city has been known.[14]

Native Americans[edit]

It is estimated that the Willamette Valley area has been inhabited for over 10,000 years. The Kalapuya peoples would gather on the plateau east and south of the current downtown area in the winter and establish camps. They fished and harvested in the streams and fields of the area. One staple of life was the camas root, and periodically the Kalapuya would set fires that would clear and fertilize the meadows where it grew.[15] In the early 1850s, the Kalapuya, along with the other native peoples west of the Cascade Mountains, were removed by the U.S. government through a combination of treaties and force. Most Kalapuya people were moved to the Grande Ronde Reservation somewhat to the west of Salem, with smaller numbers ending up at Siletz Reservation and other Oregon and Washington reservations.[16]

Europeans[edit]

The first people of European descent arrived in the area as early as 1812; they were animal trappers and food gatherers for the fur trading companies in Astoria, Oregon.

The first permanent American settlement in the area was the Jason Lee Methodist mission (1840) located in the area north of Salem known as Wheatland.[17] In 1842, the missionaries established the Oregon Institute (the forerunner of Willamette University) in the area that was to become the site of Salem. In 1844, the mission was dissolved and the town site established.

In 1851, Salem became the territorial capital after it was moved from Oregon City. The capital was moved briefly to Corvallis in 1855, but was moved back to Salem permanently that same year. Salem incorporated as a city in 1857, and with the coming of statehood in 1859, it became the state capital.[18]

Capitol buildings[edit]

Capitol building after 1935 fire

Oregon has had three capitol buildings in Salem. A two-story state house, which had been occupied for only two months, burned to the ground in December 1855. Oregon's second capitol building was completed in 1876 on the site of the original. The Revival-style building was based in part on the U.S. Capitol building. The building received its distinctive copper dome in 1893. On April 25, 1935, this building was also destroyed by fire. The third and current Oregon State Capitol was completed on the same site in 1938. It is recognizable by its distinctive pioneer statue atop the capitol dome that is plated with gold-leaf and officially named the Oregon Pioneer.

State fair and cherry festival[edit]

Agriculture has always been important to Salem, and the city has historically recognized and celebrated it in a number of ways. In 1861, Salem was chosen as the permanent site of the Oregon State Fair by the Oregon State Agricultural Association.[19] Salem is nicknamed the "Cherry City", because of the past importance of the local cherry-growing industry.[20] The first cherry festival in Salem was held in 1903 and was an annual event, with parades and the election of a cherry queen, until sometime after World War I. The event was briefly revived as the Salem Cherryland Festival for several years in the late 1940s.[21]

Geography and climate[edit]

Salem is located in the north-central Willamette Valley, in Marion and Polk counties. The 45th Parallel (roughly the halfway point between the North Pole and the Equator) passes through Salem's city limits.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 48.45 square miles (125.48 km2), of which 47.90 square miles (124.06 km2) is land and 0.55 square miles (1.42 km2) is water.[22]

Although the Willamette River flows through Salem, the North Santiam Riverwatershed is Salem's primary drinking water source. Other important streams that pass through Salem are Mill Creek, the Mill Race, Pringle Creek, and Shelton Ditch.[23] Smaller streams in the southern and southeastern parts of the city include Clark Creek, Jory Creek, Battle Creek, Croisan Creek, and Claggett Creek, while Glen Creek and Brush Creek flow through West Salem.[23]

Elevation within the city limits ranges from about 120 to 800 feet (37 to 244 m). Salem contains the volcanic Salem Hills in the south and is sandwiched by the 1,000 ft (300 m) Eola Hills directly to the west and the 600 ft (180 m) Waldo Hills to the east. Northern and eastern Salem are less hilly. South and West Salem contain some canyons and are the hilliest areas. The coast range and the Cascades—including Mount Hood, Mount Jefferson, and on the clearest of days, Mount St. Helens and Mount Adams in Washington—can be viewed from throughout the city.

Like most of the Willamette Valley area, Salem has a mediterranean climate (KöppenCsb). Rain is heaviest in late fall and throughout winter, and almost all of the annual precipitation falls between October and May, with a dry season from June through September. Light snowfall occurs in winter, but major snows are rare. Mostly cloudy skies and low cloud ceilings are commonplace during the rainy season.

Salem's mean annual temperature is 53 °F (11.7 °C);[24] its annual precipitation is 39.64 inches (1,007 mm), with an average 3.5 inches (8.9 cm) of snow included. However, over a quarter of years receive no snowfall.[24] The state capital is about 47 mi (76 km) south of Portland, but actually has a lower average temperature than that of Portland (54.4 °F or 12.4 °C),[24] due in part to the lower daily minima.

Climate data for Salem, Oregon (McNary Field), 1981–2010 normals
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 68
(20)
72
(22)
80
(27)
93
(34)
100
(38)
117
(47)
108
(42)
108
(42)
104
(40)
93
(34)
74
(23)
72
(22)
117
(47)
Mean maximum °F (°C) 58.5
(14.7)
63.2
(17.3)
68.6
(20.3)
77.7
(25.4)
87.0
(30.6)
91.5
(33.1)
97.4
(36.3)
97.0
(36.1)
92.0
(33.3)
78.8
(26.0)
63.6
(17.6)
58.4
(14.7)
100.8
(38.2)
Average high °F (°C) 47.7
(8.7)
51.6
(10.9)
56.5
(13.6)
61.1
(16.2)
67.8
(19.9)
73.9
(23.3)
82.0
(27.8)
82.4
(28.0)
76.8
(24.9)
64.1
(17.8)
52.6
(11.4)
46.2
(7.9)
63.6
(17.6)
Daily mean °F (°C) 41.2
(5.1)
43.1
(6.2)
46.9
(8.3)
50.4
(10.2)
56.2
(13.4)
61.6
(16.4)
67.6
(19.8)
67.6
(19.8)
62.6
(17.0)
53.2
(11.8)
45.5
(7.5)
40.1
(4.5)
53.0
(11.7)
Average low °F (°C) 34.7
(1.5)
34.6
(1.4)
37.2
(2.9)
39.6
(4.2)
41.7
(5.4)
49.3
(9.6)
53.1
(11.7)
52.8
(11.6)
48.4
(9.1)
42.3
(5.7)
38.4
(3.6)
34.0
(1.1)
42.4
(5.8)
Mean minimum °F (°C) 22.1
(−5.5)
21.7
(−5.7)
27.5
(−2.5)
30.1
(−1.1)
34.1
(1.2)
40.5
(4.7)
44.5
(6.9)
45.2
(7.3)
38.9
(3.8)
30.4
(−0.9)
25.6
(−3.6)
20.3
(−6.5)
16.2
(−8.8)
Record low °F (°C) −10
(−23)
−4
(−20)
12
(−11)
23
(−5)
25
(−4)
32
(0)
35
(2)
30
(−1)
26
(−3)
19
(−7)
9
(−13)
−12
(−24)
−12
(−24)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 5.96
(151)
4.56
(116)
3.99
(101)
2.81
(71)
2.22
(56)
1.54
(39)
0.46
(12)
0.44
(11)
1.28
(33)
3.03
(77)
6.50
(165)
6.86
(174)
39.64
(1,007)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 0.6
(1.5)
1.7
(4.3)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.1
(0.25)
1.1
(2.8)
3.5
(8.9)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in)17.7 15.0 17.0 14.4 11.9 8.4 2.9 3.1 6.1 11.5 18.1 18.2 144.3
Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in)0.4 0.7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.1 0.7 1.9
Source: NOAA (extremes 1893–present),[24] The Weather Channel[25]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
1860902
18702,139137.1%
18802,53818.7%
18903,42234.8%
19004,25824.4%
191014,094231.0%
192017,67925.4%
193026,26648.6%
194030,90817.7%
195043,14039.6%
196049,14213.9%
197068,29639.0%
198089,23330.7%
1990107,78620.8%
2000136,92427.0%
2010154,63712.9%
2019 (est.)174,365[3]12.8%
Sources:[26][27]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 154,637 people, 57,290 households, and 36,261 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,228.3 inhabitants per square mile (1,246.5/km2). There were 61,276 housing units at an average density of 1,279.2 per square mile (493.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 79.0% White, 1.5% African American, 1.5% Native American, 2.7% Asian, 0.9% Pacific Islander, 10.1% from other races, and 4.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 20.3% of the population.

There were 57,290 households, of which 33.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.0% were married couples living together, 13.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 36.7% were non-families. 28.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.15.

The median age in the city was 34.5 years. 25.2% of residents were under the age of 18; 10.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 27.6% were from 25 to 44; 24.5% were from 45 to 64; and 12% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.9% male and 50.1% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census of 2000, there were 136,924 people, 50,676 households, and 32,331 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,994.0 people per square mile (1,156.1/km2). There were 53,817 housing units at an average density of 1,176.8 per square mile (454.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 83.1% White, 1.3% African American, 1.5% Native American, 2.4% Asian, 0.5% Pacific Islander, 7.9% from other races, and 3.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 14.6% of the population. Non-Hispanic Whites were 70.7% of the population in 2010,[28] compared to 88.6% in 1990.[29]

There were 50,676 households, out of which 32.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.7% were married couples living together, 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.2% were non-families. 28.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 25.4% under the age of 18, 11.4% from 18 to 24, 30.1% from 25 to 44, 20.6% from 45 to 64, and 12.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $38,881, and the median income for a family was $46,409. Males had a median income of $34,746 versus $26,789 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,141. About 10.5% of families and 15.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.2% of those under age 18 and 7.1% of those age 65 or over.

Government[edit]

Salem is governed using the council–manager government model.[30] The city council consists of eight members who are elected from single member wards. The mayor is elected in a citywide vote.

The current mayor is Chuck Bennett, a Democrat first elected in 2016.

The following are Salem's city councilors:[31]

  • Ward 1: Cara Kaser
  • Ward 2: Tom Anderson
  • Ward 3: Brad Nanke
  • Ward 4: Jackie Leung
  • Ward 5: Matt Ausec
  • Ward 6: Chris Hoy
  • Ward 7: Vanessa Nordyke
  • Ward 8: Jim Lewis

Economy[edit]

Capitol Center in downtown

State government is Salem's largest employer, but the city also serves as a hub for the area farming communities and is a major agricultural food processing center.[32] It lies along the I-5 corridor and is within an hour's drive of Oregon's largest city, Portland.

Salem is the home of Kettle Foods, Inc., a maker of potato chips since 1982. Kettle employs 700 in Salem and at a plant in Bowthorpe, England. NORPAC Foods, Inc., is a large food processor in Salem and elsewhere in Marion County. Its brands include Flav-R-Pac and West-Pac frozen fruits and vegetables, and Santiam canned vegetables. Oregon Fruit Products, Inc., has been canning blackberries, marionberries and other fruits in Salem since 1935, with Oregon as its brand name.

In a bid to diversify its economic base, Salem attracted a number of computer-related manufacturing plants in the 1990s. In November 2003, the Sumitomo Mitsubishi Silicon Group (SUMCO), one of these arrivals, announced it would be closing its two siliconwafer plants at the end of 2004, eliminating 620 jobs, and moving production to other plants.[33]

Salem is the headquarters of the Oregon Department of Corrections and home to four state correctional facilities, including the Oregon State Penitentiary, Oregon's only maximum-security prison.

Numerous projects are underway to increase the supply of housing in the downtown core. These projects will provide upscale, low- and high-rise condominium and office space.

Top employers[edit]

According to Salem's 2018 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[34] the top employers in the area are:

People and culture[edit]

Neighborhood associations[edit]

See also: Four Corners, Oregon

Central area of Salem 1900

Salem has 18 recognized neighborhood associations, which are independent groups that receive administrative support from the city.[35]

Cultural events and series[edit]

Skateboarder in Marion Square Park

From May through October the Salem Saturday Market, located north of the Capitol, exhibits an emphasis on local products including crafts, baked goods, produce, meat, and other items.[36] In addition to the Saturday Market, there is a Wednesday Farmers' Market hosted downtown in Courthouse Square during the summer, as well a Holiday Gift Market in December. The 60+ year old, indoor Saturday Public Market is open all year.[36]

The annual World Beat Festival, held in June, is sponsored by the nonprofit Salem Multicultural Institute.[37] The event lasts for two days and is held at the Riverfront Park. It features international crafts, music, dance, food, and folklore from every continent, and in recent years has held a Dragon Boat race similar to the ones held during the nearby Rose Festival in Portland.[38]

The Salem Art Association sponsors the annual Salem Art Fair and Festival, which takes place at Bush's Pasture Park during the summer.[39] Its displays, interactive exhibits, food, and performances attract thousands of visitors each year.[40]

The Bite of Salem, held in July at the Riverfront Park, is an event similar to others such as the Bite of Oregon in Portland. The event consists of a weekend of local restaurants in Salem offering samples of their menus to patrons in a festival atmosphere, with live entertainment and benefiting local charities. In the summer, Chef's Nite Out is a wine and food benefit held for Marion-Polk Food Share.[41] Oregon Wine & Food Festival takes place at that state's fairgrounds in January.

The largest event in Salem is the Oregon State Fair at the end of August through Labor Day. Located in the Oregon State Fairgrounds in North Salem, the fair offers exhibits, competitions and carnival rides. Other events such as concerts, horse shows and rodeos take place at the Oregon State Fair and Expo Center throughout the year.[42]

The Mid-Valley Video Festival offers local, national and international independent films in theaters throughout the city.[43]

The Salem Film Festival has included feature films that were Oregon premieres.[44]

The Salem Repertory Theatre presents shows at the Reed Opera House.[45] The Pentacle Theatre, which features plays and musicals, is located in West Salem.[46] The Elsinore Theatre is a historic landmark featuring recitals, concerts, films, and plays. It has the largest working pipe organ on the west coast, a remnant of its days as a showcase for silent films, in the early days of cinema. Grand Theater is newly renovated and is the home of Enlightened Theatrics, a professional theatre company and hosts the Salem Progressive Film Series on the third Tuesday nine months of the year.

Capitol Pride (Salem's yearly Gay Pride Event), hosted by Aundrea Smith (Author of: "Your Local Queer"; 2019) is held in early August.[47]

The personal house and garden of landscape architects Elizabeth Lord and Edith Schryver, known as Gaiety Hollow, is on the National Register of Historic Places. Their firm Lord & Schryver designed the gardens of Historic Deepwood Estate.

Museums and other points of interest[edit]

Downtown Salem looking west

In addition to the Oregon State Capitol and adjacent Willson Park, Salem's downtown contains the Mission Mill Museum, Hallie Ford Museum of Art, the Elsinore Theatre, Riverfront Park, the Willamette River, some of the oldest buildings in Oregon, as well as shopping and restaurants. The A.C. Gilbert's Discovery Village interactive children's museum and Prewitt-Allen Archaeological Museum are both also located in Salem.[48]

The two leading candidates for the tallest building in Salem are Salem First United Methodist Church and the Capitol Center.[49] A private survey commissioned by a local publication holds that the church is the tallest.[50] The tall white spire of the 1878 church rises at the intersection of Church and State Streets across from the Capitol grounds. The Capitol Center (originally the First National Bank Building, then the Livesley Building) was built in 1927 by former Salem mayor Thomas A. Livesley, a prominent Salem-area businessman and civic leader. At that time of its completion, it was the tallest commercial building in the state.[49]

In 1988, Livesley's family home was purchased through private donations and was donated to the state. It now serves as the official residence of the Governor and family. Now known as Mahonia Hall, it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) in 1990.

The Oregon Symphony, based in Portland, presents approximately ten classical and pops concerts each year in Salem. The Salem Chamber Orchestra includes professional area musicians as well as students.[51] The Salem Armory Auditorium has hosted touring bands including Korn and Phish.

The Salem Concert Band is a community band made up of professional and amateur musicians that performs several classical and pops concerts annually.[52]

Because Salem is the state capital, it has a multitude of government agencies, departments, and boards housed in buildings with architectural designs ranging from the early 20th century to examples of state-of-the-art civil building design.

The historic Reed Opera House in downtown Salem has a number of local shops and dining establishments, as well as an art gallery.

Salem has been awarded "Tree City USA" status by the National Arbor Day Foundation for 30 consecutive years for its dedication to urban forestry.[53] Salem was the first city in Oregon to receive the award.[54] In keeping with the city's "Cherry City" theme, flowering cherry trees have been planted along many Salem streets as well as on the Capitol Mall across from the Capitol.

The Salem Public Library's main branch is located just south of downtown. A branch library is located in West Salem (Polk County). The Library participates in the Chemeketa Cooperative Regional Library Service, so Salem Public Library cards are also valid in the member libraries in Yamhill, Polk, Marion, and parts of Linn County. In addition to the Salem Public Library, the Mark O. Hatfield Library at Willamette University is open to the public as well, although the hours are limited.

The film One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest was filmed at the Oregon State Hospital.

Salem and its environs have a multitude of wineries and vineyards that are open to the public.[55]

Media[edit]

Salem has one daily newspaper, the Gannett-owned Statesman Journal. The Capital Press, a weekly agricultural newspaper, is published in the city and is distributed throughout the West Coast. The monthly Salem Business Journal covers business and government.[56]Salem Magazine, published quarterly, both in physical and digital (online) issues, focuses upon its people; its unique culture; and its downtown and surrounding neighborhood communities.[57]

Northwest Television operates three television stations that have Salem transmitters: KWVT-LD, KSLM, and KPWC, which serve an area from Longview, Washington, to Eugene, Oregon. Two stations are licensed to Salem but operate out of Portland: KPXG-TV and KRCW.

As of 2012, seven radio stations broadcast from Salem, including three commercial AM stations, three non-commercial FM stations, and a community radio station. KBZY was a popular Top 40 station from its sign-on in 1957 through the 1960s and 1970s. Today KBZY has an oldies format, and continues to use live and local personalities. KBZY is affiliated with the ABC Radio Network. KYKN carries syndicated conservative talk hosts. KZGD is a Spanish language sports talk station. KSLM features conservative talk programming. KWBX is a non-commercial station licensed to Corban University with a Contemporary Christian format. KMUZ, established in 2012, is a non-commercial community radio station carrying locally produced content in a variety format.

Salem is part of the Portland Arbitron survey area for radio stations, and most of the Portland stations can be received in Salem, including powerful AM stations news/talkKEX, CBS Sports Radio affiliate KXTG, and Fox Sports Radio affiliate KPOJ. Stations to the south in Corvallis and Albany are also easily heard in Salem.

NPR programming is carried by Oregon Public Broadcasting, which can be heard on KOPB-FM from Portland, and KOAC from Corvallis.

Parks and recreation[edit]

City parks[edit]

Riverfront Park in downtown

Salem's Department of Community Services' Parks Operations Division is responsible for a park system encompassing 1,874 acres (758 ha) with 29.53 miles (47.52 km) of trails, 46 parks, and another 55 open and undeveloped areas.[58]

Minto-Brown Island Park is the largest at 1,200 acres (490 ha).[59]

Bush's Pasture Park, a 90.5-acre (36.6 ha) urban park a few blocks south of downtown Salem, features natural groves of native Oregon White Oak trees, the historic Bush House, a rose garden, and adjacent Deepwood Estates.[60]

Other city parks include 101-acre (41 ha) Cascade Gateway Park and 23-acre (9.3 ha) Riverfront Park, which is adjacent to downtown and the Willamette River and is home to the Salem Carousel. Marion Square Park is downtown next to Marion Street Bridge and has a skatepark and basketball court.[61] The skatepark also allows bicycles.[61] Marion Square Park was laid out by city founder William H. Willson, and is the next oldest municipal park in Salem after Willson Park at the Oregon State Capitol.[61]

Across the Willamette River in West Salem is the 114-acre (46 ha) Wallace Marine Park, which includes a boat ramp and floating boat dock allowing easy access to the river for water sports. The NRHP-listed Union Street Railroad Bridge, repurposed as a bicycle and pedestrian bridge, connects Wallace Marine Park and West Salem to Riverfront Park and downtown Salem.

Salem is also home to one of the smallest city parks in the world, Waldo Park, which consists of a single Sequoia tree.[62]

The capitol grounds, which are maintained by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, cover three city blocks and include Willson and Capitol parks.

Recreation[edit]

Other large parks located in the Salem area include the 1,680-acre (680 ha) Willamette Mission State Park north of the city, and Silver Falls State Park east of Salem. Both of these parks have extensive hiking, biking, and horse trails.

Salem's central location provides access to a wide variety of recreational activities in a variety of climates and geographies year round. The Coast Range and the Pacific Ocean are to the west. The Santiam Canyon area, the Western Cascades and the High Cascades are to the east. Portland and its environs are to the north, while Eugene and its environs are to the south.

Salem also has two disc golf courses. A nine-hole course located in the woods of Woodmansee Park (located behind Judson Middle School), and a more open style 18-hole course located throughout Cascade Gateway Park. They are both free and open to the public.

Sports[edit]

Education[edit]

Elementary and secondary[edit]

Salem's public elementary and secondary schools are part of the Salem-Keizer School District which has approximately 39,000 students and is the second largest public school district in the state.[63] The city also has many private elementary and secondary schools such as Blanchet Catholic School and Salem Academy Christian. One school, Willamette Academy, is part of an outreach program run by Willamette University that is designed to expose under-represented students to the rewards of an academic life at an early age (7th–12th grade).[64]

Salem is also home to several public boarding schools, the Chemawa Indian School (a Native American high school), and the Oregon School for the Deaf.

Colleges and universities[edit]

Post secondary schools include Chemeketa Community College, Corban University, Tokyo International University of America, and Willamette University, the oldest university in the American west.[65]Portland State University, Eastern Oregon University, Western Oregon University and Oregon State University provide classes and a handful of undergraduate degrees at Chemeketa Community College.

Infrastructure[edit]

Transportation[edit]

Buses at the Downtown Transit Center of Cherriotsin 2018
Built in 1918, Salem's passenger train depot serves Amtrak and Greyhound.

Cherriots, an independent government agency, provides fixed-route bus service, rideshare matching, and paratransit/lift services for the disabled, within the urban growth boundary. They also operate Cherriots Regional, previously known as Chemeketa Area Regional Transportation System (CARTS), which provides bus service that connects Salem to destinations as far north as Wilsonville, as far west as Dallas, and to the east to Silverton and up the Santiam Canyon to Mill City. Cherriots, in cooperation with Wilsonville's SMART, provides routes between downtown Salem and Wilsonville. From Wilsonville, WES Commuter Rail connects to TriMet routes in Beaverton, including MAX Light Rail.

Greyhound Lines provides north–south service and connecting carrier service to Bend, Oregon, from the Salem Amtrak station.

Amtrak, the national passenger rail system, leases the Salem Depot from the Oregon Department of Transportation. The Coast Starlight provides daily north–south service to cities between Los Angeles, California and Seattle, Washington. Amtrak Cascades trains, operating as far north as Vancouver, British Columbia and as far south as Eugene, Oregon, serve Salem several times daily in both directions.

HUT Airport Shuttle provides transportation to Portland International Airport. HUT also serves Corvallis with a second stop at Oregon State University, Albany, and Woodburn. Mountain Express provides transportation between Salem and Bend.[66]

McNary Field (Salem Municipal Airport) is owned and operated by the City of Salem. It serves primarily general aviation and the Oregon National Guard – Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF). Delta Connection offered commercial air service with two daily flights to Salt Lake City, Utah, from July 2007. However, citing fuel costs versus a load factor of less than 85 percent, the service was discontinued in October 2008. The city plans to go forward with airport improvements that were announced when service was commenced, including a longer runway and an expanded terminal building.[67]

The city is served by the following highways:

Healthcare[edit]

Salem Hospital Regional Health Services, one of the largest of Oregon's 57 acute care hospitals, is a 454-bed acute care medical facility. It is a not-for-profit organization, and is also the city's largest private employer.[68]

Notable people[edit]

  • Ryan Allen, football player for the Tennessee Titans
  • George Andrews, mathematician[69]
  • Debbie Armstrong, gold medalist in skiing at the 1984 Winter Olympics
  • Ryan Bailey, Olympic sprinter[70]
  • Cal Barnes, actor, director, screenwriter, film producer, novelist, and playwright[71]
  • Lute Barnes, baseball player for the New York Mets.[72]
  • Kat Bjelland, lead singer of the punk rock band Babes in Toyland[73]
  • Jerome Brudos, serial killer[74]
  • Gus Envela Jr., Olympic sprinter[75]
  • John Fahey, musician, author and founder of Takoma records[76]
  • Pat Fitzsimons, PGA Tour golfer[77]
  • Ron Funches, standup comedian
  • Thomas Leigh Gatch, Vice Admiral, U.S. Navy
  • Alfred Carlton Gilbert, inventor, athlete, toy-maker, and businessman. Known for inventing the Erector Set, and for winning an Olympic gold medal.[78]
  • Craig Hanneman, NFL defensive lineman (1972–1975)
  • Jon Heder, actor, filmmaker, and screenwriter[79]
  • Herbert Hoover, 31st President of the United States; worked in Salem in the 1880s[80]
  • Bob Horn, NFL linebacker (1976–1983)
  • Justin Kirk, actor[81]
  • Kelly LeMieux, bass guitarist for Goldfinger[82]
  • Jed Lowrie, Major League Baseball shortstop[83]
  • Technical Sergeant Donald G. Malarkey, former non-commissioned officer with Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, in the 101st Airborne Division of the U.S. Army during World War II
  • Richard Laurence Marquette, serial killer[84]
  • Douglas McKay, mayor of Salem, State Senator, Governor of Oregon, and U.S. Secretary of the Interior[85]
  • Larry Norman, Christian rock musician[86]
  • Thelma Payne, diver, 1920 Summer Olympics bronze medalist
  • Ben Petrick, baseball player
  • Joe Preston, bassist for several metal and rock bands[87]
  • Leonard Stone, actor[88]
  • William L. Sullivan, author of outdoor guide books
  • Bill Swancutt, football player[89]
  • Stephen Thorsett, professor and astronomer[90]
  • Michael Totten, journalist and novelist[91]
  • Zollie Volchok, former general manager of the Seattle SuperSonics and winner of the 1983 NBA Executive of the Year Award[92]
  • Randall Woodfield, murderer and suspected serial killer
  • Dolora Zajick, opera singer

Sister cities[edit]

Salem has three sister cities:[93]

As of 2014, there was talk of reviving the now-stagnant Sister City project launched in 1964 with Salem in Tamil Nadu, India.[94]

References[edit]

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  21. ^Hermann, Shirley. "Salem's Cherry Festival". Archived from the original on September 28, 2007. Retrieved August 5, 2007.
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  38. ^Perez, Elida S. (June 26, 2008). "Pacific Islands shine at World Beat". Statesman Journal. p. W8. Archived from the original on March 16, 2013. Retrieved November 27, 2011.
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Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salem,_Oregon

Capital of Oregon

(Last Updated On: February 22, 2018)

Despite the fact that many of us have had to memorize them since we were children, U.S. capitals often seem unintuitive when you take the time to think about it. For example, why doesn’t the state’s most prosperous city get the title of capital? You could make the case here for many states, like New York City over Albany for New York or New Orleans over Baton Rouge for Louisiana. Another possible example is Salem in Oregon, and historically, some people in the state felt the same way.

The Founding of Salem

Salem is in the heart of the Willamette Valley, initially settled by the Kalapuya Native American people. In their language, they called it Chim-i-ki-ti, which meant “meeting place” or “resting place.” The first settlers who came to the area were led by Methodist Jason Lee in 1840. This was his second attempt to create a mission in the then-Oregon Country. At the time, the area was known as Chemeketa, a variant on its original Native American name. Others called it Mill Creek due to its proximity to the eponymous body of water.

So how does one go from the native name to Salem? It’s not entirely clear. The most common concept held is that William H. Wilson, who planned out the original town in 1846, chose the name in tribute to the Hebrew word Shalom. Other theories include that it was in reference to Salem, Massachusetts.

Capital Clashes

The Willamette Heritage Center explains that the provincial government of Oregon (remember, these were the pioneer days) was originally set up in Oregon City. Oregon City had the advantage of being centrally located. However, being a river port town and situated on the Oregon Trail meant that Salem was prospering economically at the time. In 1851, the territory’s legislature passed a bill that named Salem the formal capital, Portland the home of the territory jail, and Maryville (known as Corvallis today) as the home of the territory’s university.

Despite the fact that Salem as the capital was law, not everyone was happy about the decision. Being the seat of power for the local government more jobs and revenue to the surrounding community. Other cities wanted what Salem had, and this led to squabbling for years. Right after the bill was passed, the territory’s governor spoke out against it. At one point, some legislators refused to meet in the city to legislate.

The U.S. Congress passed a resolution to confirm that Salem was the capital, but the story didn’t end there. Before the capitol building was even built, the state moved the capital to Maryville before moving it back shortly afterward. However, Salem’s capitol building ended up burning down, still leaving things up in the air. At this point, Eugene and Portland were the strongest contenders.

In the end, it would be the people of Oregon who made Salem its capital, when the issue was decided by general election in 1862 and 1864. Salem beat out Portland in both cases, with nearly twice as many votes.

Ironically, those people back then who thought that being the capital meant good business were proved right. Today, the government employs 30% of the city’s workers. It has a modest 150,000 people, but is known across the state as a great destination for skiing and wine.

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Источник: https://www.sporcle.com/blog/2018/02/why-is-salem-the-capital-of-oregon/

Salem, Oregon

00-salem-capitol-jonquilSalem, Oregon

  • Oregon became a state February 14, 1859, the 33rd state admitted to the Union.
  • Salem became state capital 1859
  • Established: 1850
  • Name Origin: Possibilities include named for Salem, Massachusetts, or last letters of “Jerusalem,” or version of “Shalom” for peace

William Willson filed plats in 1850 for the main part of the city, and suggested the name Salem as an Anglicized version of the word “Shalom.” David Leslie, President of the town’s Trustees, suggested using the last five letters of “Jerusalem.” Leslie was educated in Salem, Massachusetts, which also may have influenced his suggestion.

The gold-leafed bronze statue on top of Oregon’s capitol symbolizes the rugged pioneers who carved Oregon out of the wilderness. But the building, completed in 1938, is a modern Greek-Art Deco design, matched by four more state buildings in Capitol Mall. On the grounds are many statuary and monuments.

Salem is in the beautiful Willamette Valley; Willamette University, the oldest institution of higher learning west of the Missouri River, is here too; on campus visit many historic buildings and the Mark Hatfield Library.

At Mission Mill Village fleece is turned into fabric in the Woolen Mill Museum; several parsonages interpret missionary family life of the 1800’s. Deepwood Estate and the Bush House are authentic Victorian mansions open for tours; Honeywood Winery is Oregon’s oldest producing winery.

Key Words: pioneers, Willamette, woolen, missionary, winery

Things To Love About Salem

The freshness of the air, the farms surrounding everything, the milk, the cheese, the golden-hearted people there, the independent spirit of the pioneers, the love of place. The rhodies everywhere you look.

Blogs To Read About Salem

Shut The Front Door!https://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2044

Sunday Churchhttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2070

Once Upon A Timehttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2090

When Babies Are Bornhttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2103

That Very Pleased Lookhttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2175

Tell Me About Ithttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2109

Like Little Bear’s Porridgehttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2131

Go Tell Aunt Rhodiehttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2155

Elephant DNAhttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2183

The Wheels On The Bushttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2200

Cut The Cheesehttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2216

And The Beat Goes Onhttps://capitalcitiesusa.org/?p=2495

Capital City Basics

  • Population: 154,637, 26th largest in population of the 50 capital cities
  • Population density: 3,229 persons per square mile
  • Land area of city: 47.9 square miles
  • Elevation: 154 feet, 38th highest in elevation of the 50 capital cities
  • Normal high/low temps: January 48/35, July 82/53. Annual rainfall: 40 inches
  • Time Zone: Pacific
  • Water near: Willamette River
  • Mountains near: Cascade Mountains, Coast Range. Mount Hood in the northern part of the state is the highest point in Oregon at 11,249 feet.
  • Miles to three nearest State Capitals: Olympia, WA 161; Boise, ID 454; Sacramento, CA 536
  • Miles to National Capitol in Washington, DC: 2,856

Population Statistics from US 2010 Census

  • 154,637           Population
  • 25.2%              Under 18
  • 12.0%              Over 65
  • 2.7%                Asian
  • 1.5%                 Black
  • 20.3%              Hispanic/Latino
  • 1.5%                 Native Alaskan or American Indian
  • 0.9%                Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander
  • 70.7%              White

Education Statistics from US 2010 Census

  • 20.9%              English Not Spoken at Home
  • 85.6%              High School Graduate
  • 25.9%              Bachelor’s Degree or Higher

Economic Statistics from US 2010 Census

  • 17.4%               Below Poverty Level
  • $23,162           Per Capita Income
  • $44,226          Median Household Income
  • $199,500        Median Value of Home
  • 56.6%              Home Ownership

City: http://www.cityofsalem.net/Pages/default.aspx

Visitors: http://www.travelsalem.com/

 

 

 

 

Источник: https://capitalcitiesusa.org/?page_id=495
Player & InfoDaley Jones #5: RS, S OR: Independence

5'9"'21

 B+

R

Coachable, hard working, natural leader and determined multi-sport athlete.   Edith Santoyo Gutierrez L, DS OR: Salem

4'11"'21

116B-

R

coachable, multi-sport athlete, organized, disciplined, extroverted, good communication skills, team player.   Eliana Dean RS, S OR: Keizer

5'6"'21

135A-

R

Great ball control, great court awareness, can hit, passing is great, defense is strong, spot shots are on point, serving strong, communication is good.   Nayeli Lopez #13: Mid OR: Monmouth

5'8"'21

 B+

R

Coachable   Sarah Cortes #11: DS OR: Salem

5'5"'21

150B

R

team player determined to get every ball with resilience, disciplined and multi- sport athlete   Sofia Magana #4: L, DS OR: Salem

5'4"'21

130A-

R

Multi sport, aggressive, coachable, always willing to try new things, eager to learn & become better.   Trinity Kampstra OH, Mid OR: Keizer

5'10"'21

135C+

R

I am a hard worker who is very determined when it comes to volleyball. I except criticism and I learn from the advice given.  
Источник: https://www.connectvolleyball.com/company/capital-city-elite-vbc---oregon/roster/womens-2021
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