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Tyra Banks on another season of 'America's Next Top Model'

Banks spoke about the possibility of another season of her reality show.

"America's Next Top Model" fans could be in for a serious treat if Tyra Banks gets her way.

The former model, entrepreneur and businesswoman, who recently launched her experiential model-themed amusement park, ModelLand, says she's open to and already thinking about coming back for another season of her popular reality series.

"You know, we've done 25 cycles of 'America's Next Top Model' and I feel that we that we should at least end at 25," Banks told ABC Audio. "At least do that."

Banks, who created the reality competition series in 2003, served as host for 23 seasons.

The series aired on various networks over the course of 15 years.

Now, almost two years after its last episode, Banks says she's ready to bring it all back.

"So, we're seeing if that could happen," she shared. "We shall see."


ABC News
Источник: https://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Culture/tyra-banks-season-americas-top-model/story?id=69281087

Tyra Banks admits her past ‘America’s Next Top Model’ behaviour was ‘off’, insensitive

Tyra Banks has broken her silence and addressed the America’s Next Top Model (ANTM) clips that resurfaced of her last week and sparked controversy on social media.

“Been seeing the posts about the insensitivity of some past ANTM moments and I agree with you,” Banks tweeted Friday. “Looking back, those were some really off choices. Appreciate your honest feedback and am sending so much love and virtual hugs.”

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One of the major videos that sparked backlash against Banks on Twitter last week was from Season 6 of the aspiring model competition show.

Banks told ANTM contestant Dani Evans that she would never be a model unless she fixes the gap in her teeth.

“So Danielle, you went to the dentist but you refused to have your gap closed. Do you really think you can have a CoverGirl contract with a gap in your mouth?” Tyra said in the 2006 episode.

“Yes, why not?” Evans responded.

“This is all people see. It’s easy, breezy, beautiful CoverGirl,” Banks said while imitating that she has a gap in her teeth with her finger. “It’s not marketable.”

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Evans, who ended up winning the season, posted a video on Instagram and explained that the now-viral moment was played up for TV in 2006.

Evans said she wasn’t going to speak on the moment until model Slick Woods reached out to her.

“I honestly didn’t feel it was necessary until late last night when I received a message from Slick Woods,” Evans said. “I knew in that moment after reading her words that I have a responsibility to address what really happened and to speak my truth.”

She explained that the producers had never told her that Banks wanted her to get her gap closed.

“She (Tyra) looks off camera to production, which none of you guys ever see. I look off stage, camera, right to production. Ken Mok gives me one of these (shrugs shoulders),” Evans said. “In that moment I knew what was happening. I knew that I was basically set up and not being told that Tyra wants me to get my gap closed so that it’s good for TV.”

Evans also revealed that they filmed the conversation multiple times to get it right for TV.

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Fenty model Slick Woods, who also has a gap between her front teeth, posted the viral clip to Instagram and wrote, “No one should ever talk to you like that @danievans1.”

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“That episode f–ked up little simone/slick so that’s how y’all feel @tyrabanks @miss_jalexander???” Slick Woods added.

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Another moment that shocked viewers was from Season 4 when Banks eliminated two models and she yelled at Tiffany Richardson for not showing the same upset emotion that Rebecca Epley did.

After Banks announced that both models were eliminated from the competition, Richardson tried to cheer up the other crying models by hugging them and making jokes.

“Can you guys stand in front of me? I just want to say one more thing to you,” Banks said. “Rebecca, I admire your emotion right now. It shows to me that this was something that is very important to you.”

“Tiffany, I’m extremely disappointed in you. This is a joke to you,” Banks continued. “You’ve been through anger management, you’ve been through your grandmother getting her lights turned off to buy you a swimsuit for this competition and you go over there and you joke and you laugh?

“This is serious to these girls, and it should be serious to you,” Banks added.

“Looks can be deceiving. I’m hurt. I am,” Richardson told Banks. “But I can’t change it Tyra. I’m sick of crying about stuff that I cannot change. I’m sick of being disappointed. I’m sick of all of it.”

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As the pair argued back and forth, Banks became irritated and yelled: “Do you know that you had a possibility to win? Do you know that all of America is rooting for you?”

The argument continued and Banks yelled: “Stop it! I have never in my life yelled at a girl like this. When my mother yells like this it’s because she loves me.

“I was rooting for you! We were all rooting for you!” Banks says, reciting the memorable line from the series that has turned into a meme.

Tyra Banks admits her past ‘America’s Next Top Model’ behaviour was ‘off’, insensitive - image

ANTM producer Ken Mok issued an apology on Twitter after Banks addressed the criticism from the viral clips.

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“Want to reiterate what @tyrabanks said. I look at some of those #ANTM moments and cringe,” Mok tweeted. “Just a FYI – the entire creative team made the choices in those shows – not just Tyra. So please feel free to yell at me for some of the worst moments in ANTM [email protected] Apologies to all.”

Banks created ANTM in 2003 and hosted the show for every season, which they referred to as cycles, from Season 1-22. She took a break from Season 23 as Rita Ora hosted but returned to host Season 24 in 2018.

It is currently unclear if ANTM will have a 25th season.

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© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Источник: https://globalnews.ca/news/6934052/tyra-banks-addresses-americas-next-top-model/

Tyra Banks Is Again Getting Called Out Online for 'America's Next Top Model' Challenges

Tyra Banks is in the hot seat once again over her poor treatment of models on her former reality TV competition series, America's Next Top Model.

The backlash is nothing new. In fact, every couple of months or so, someone on Twitter dredges up old clips of ANTM or posts a message criticizing the show, the outlandish challenges models were forced to perform and Banks' mean antics displayed during the series' 25-season run. The tweet goes viral and dozens of people start sharing their memories of the show and opinions of the trauma the contestants must have endured as they attempted to win the coveted prize: a contract with a modeling agency, a spread in a fashion magazine, a commercial feature and $100,000.

Such was the case on Thursday after one Twitter user presented the poll, "Who was the bigger reality TV terrorizer?"; the choices were between Banks and Diddy, who was the head honcho on MTV's former reality series Making the Band.

Banks was overwhelmingly dubbed the bigger terror.

"Tyra was a menace, she wasn't preparing them girls for modeling," one Twitter user wrote, "She was preparing them for The Hunger Games."

While few people can forget the time Diddy forced the Making the Band 2 cast members to walk five miles to get him a slice of cheesecake from Junior's in Brooklyn in the dead of winter in 2002, in some people's eyes, that just couldn't top the madness models were exposed to on ANTM.

The modeling competition—which its currently streaming on Netflix—saw young contestants who were desperate for stardom perform the most heinous of challenges, like shave their heads bald under Tyra's instruction just to get sent home at the end of an episode, wear blackface and confess their biggest fears only for Banks to exploit them.

People remembered all those moments and plenty of others too, like during Cycle 21 makeovers when she ordered one male contestant to have a fake beard glued to his face or that time she models had to strut down a dangerous vertical catwalk on the side of a building during Cycle 20.

However, the worst instance of Banks' terrorizing, according to some people on social media, may have come during Cycle 6 when the former talk show host tried to force contestant Danielle Evans to get dental surgery, telling Evans that her gap-tooth smile wasn't marketable.

"Nah deada** Tyra would be like: Oh you like the gap in your teeth? Close it or go home. Tyra later in that same episode: You're going home," one Twitter user wrote.

Another replied: "She told Danielle—a black model—that she had to have her gap closed and change how she talks, or she'd go home and never become a cover girl. Then seasons later she had a white model get her gap surgically widened so she could embody Lauren Hutton. A model from back in the day."

There were still some folks who felt the ongoing criticism over Banks and the show was unwarranted. After all, ANTM hasn't aired since 2015.

"#TyraBanks is trending again? Seriously? For shows thats been off the air for damn there 10 years? Let it go! She's an icon, a trendsetter, and yes I'm Team #Tyra! The criticism she gets is so tired. If the girls didnt want to be there on her show, she couldnt hold them prisoner!" one Twitter user wrote.

Newsweek has reached out to Banks for comment.

Источник: https://www.newsweek.com/tyra-banks-twitter-antm-criticism-1563455

One of the world's top supermodels in the 1990s and into the 21st century, Tyra Banks broke through the limited career options available to the distractingly beautiful and made a name for herself as a compassionate, media-savvy television producer and host. Having conquered international fashion magazines and runways, Banks racked up a number of significant achievements in the U.S. as the first African-American model to grace the covers of the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue and the Victoria's Secret lingerie catalog. Banks made a handful of acting efforts, including a stint on "The Fresh Prince of Bel Air" (NBC, 1990-96) before finding her niche as the creator and original host of "America's Next Top Model" (UPN/The CW, 2003-2015, VH1 2016- ) and "The Tyra Banks Show" (syndicated, 2005-10). The supermodel talent search peppered with cat fights became a top-rated guilty pleasure, while Banks' syndicated daytime talk show rose above the competition, thanks to the hostess' emotional and personal approach to sensitive female topics such as body image and gender roles. Even after leaving hosting duties for "Top Model" in 2015 (before announcing her return in 2017), Banks' ongoing philanthropic and onscreen efforts to empower and encourage young women led to her recognition as a powerful one-woman media empire styled after her idol, Oprah Winfrey.

Источник: /us/en/

Did Tyra Banks bully Blacks on 'America’s Next Top Model'? Inside the shocking scandal and Angelea Preston lawsuit

Tyra Banks' show 'America's Next Top Model' was one of the most popular shows on television during the early 2000s. The supermodel was not only the executive producer of the show but also the hostess and one of the judges on the show. The reality competition show revolved around aspiring models from across the country being groomed to become the next supermodel in the industry.

The glitz, glamor, drama between the contestants, and the subtle shade by the judges towards the aspiring models, were enough to keep the audience hooked to the show. Although the show was definitely entertaining and fun to watch back in the day if you rewatched it today chances are you might cringe on hearing the feedback of the judges or feel extremely uncomfortable watching how Tyra treated certain contestants, especially persons of color (POC). Ever so often Tyra begins trending on Twitter when people rewatch 'ANTM' and begin criticizing the supermodel for her 'bullying behavior. 

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Was Tyra Banks a 'bully' and 'racist' on 'America's Next Top Model'?

There are numerous clips across the internet featuring snippets from the popular The CW show where Tyra can be seen giving some very questionable feedback or criticism to the contestants or even setting up inappropriate challenges that the contestants might not entirely be on board with. For instance, one of the cycles had a 'bi-racial' photoshoot where the caucasian contestants were made to do a 'Black face', and one of the contestants was even asked to fix the gap in her teeth. 

The nude photo shoot which is a part of the show left a few contestants a bit uncomfortable. Instead of trying to make them comfortable about posing nude or understanding the reason behind certain contestants' reluctance and hesitation, Tyra and the other judges used to constantly push the contestants into doing the challenges they were up for saying they have to push themselves out of their comfort zone. The judges also insensitively deemed contestants as unwilling to cooperate if they resisted doing any challenge or photoshoots.

In fact, former contestant Jeana Turner of the show's 24th cycle made an explosive tell-all video on YouTube where she revealed the behind-the-scenes of 'America's Next Top Model'. She described her experience on the show as "exploitative" and even claimed to be traumatized by Tyra and the other judges when they shamed her for doing photoshoots for Playboy. 

Watch the video here:



 

A user tweeted, "This is part of the reason I stopped watching the show. I always felt Tyra had a vendetta for darker skinned Black women." Another user shared, "So, Tyra’s trending for her exploitation and degradation of hundreds of young women again .. I got time." "You guys are just realizing Tyra Banks is a colorist bully....especially to dark skin women. I noticed it early on and stopped watching. As a dark skin girl, I heard some of the same lines she masked as constructive criticism," pointed out another user.


This is part of the reason I stopped watching the show. I always felt Tyra had a vendetta for darker skinned Black women. https://t.co/81Q78iGqcb

— 📸Tanisha 🍯🏹📜 (@Tanisha_Ev) April 13, 2021

 


You guys are just realizing Tyra Banks is a colorist bully....especially to dark skin women. I noticed it early on and stopped watching. As a dark skin girl, I heard some of the same lines she masked as constructive criticism. pic.twitter.com/uES2SDH6dG

— blackgirldontsink (@jamaicantabicat) April 13, 2021

 

In case you're wondering how Tyra feels about these criticisms then we got you covered. In May 2020, the supermodel tweeted acknowledging that she was 'insensitive' on "some past ANTM" moments. "Been seeing the posts about the insensitivity of some past ANTM moments and I agree with you.  Looking back, those were some really off choices. Appreciate your honest feedback and am sending so much love and virtual hugs," she posted.


Been seeing the posts about the insensitivity of some past ANTM moments and I agree with you. Looking back, those were some really off choices. Appreciate your honest feedback and am sending so much love and virtual hugs. ❤️

— Tyra Banks (@tyrabanks) May 9, 2020

 

Why did Angelea Preston sue Tyra Banks and The CW?

Tyra's biases finally caught up to her when former contestant Angelea Preston sued the hostess / executive producer of 'America's Next Top Model' and The CW for denying her the winning prize despite winning the show's cycle 17 in 2011. The show's winner gets a $100,000 contract with CoverGirl cosmetics and a magazine fashion spread, which is a huge deal in the modeling world.

Despite winning the season, unfortunately, Angelea still couldn't enjoy her spoils as she was "disqualified" because she worked as an escort for a year prior to joining the show. Angelea sued Tyra and The CW for $3 million, which she estimated as her loss of earnings due to being disqualified.



 

Tyra is currently working on launching ModelLand, a “first-of-its-kind, story-driven” fashion and modeling attraction in Santa Monica. ModelLand hopes to help visitors reimagine what it means to be ‘attractive’ in today’s world. The destination was founded on the idea of helping “[people of] all shapes AND all sizes AND all ages AND all shades deserve to feel beautiful, powerful, and experience the fantasy version of themselves,” the ModelLand website explains. “When you step into ModelLand, you enter a fantastical world where we will celebrate your uniqueness while we help you masters your angles and up your photo game," reveals the brand's website. 

If you have a news scoop or an interesting story for us, please reach out at (323) 421-7514
Источник: https://meaww.com/tyra-banks-americas-next-top-model-racist-bully-black-face-jeanna-turner-angelea-preston-twitter

A former supermodel, Tyra Banks turned her runway success into a multimedia brand and worked at the helm of two successful TV series simultaneously, 'America's Next Top Model,' and 'The Tyra Banks Show.'

Who Is Tyra Banks?

Tyra Banks was a leading international fashion model and the first Black woman to land on the cover of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue. She later hosted the reality TV program America's Next Top Model and her own daytime talk show, for which she won two Emmy Awards. Banks has continued to expand her business interests, launching her own cosmetics line in 2014. Staring in 2017, Banks took over Nick Cannon's hosting duties on America's Got Talent

Early Life

Tyra Lynne Banks was born on December 4, 1973, in Inglewood, California. Her father, Don Banks, was a computer consultant and her mother, Carolyn, was a medical photographer. Banks' parents divorced when she was only six years old, but she says that she was too young for the divorce to negatively affect her. "As far as I could see, I had it made," Banks remembers. "I stayed with Mommy on the weekdays and Daddy on the weekends. I had two birthday parties, two Christmases. Double the presents, double the love."

Banks says that she developed a love for food — and not always healthy food — from a very young age, devouring fried chicken, candied yams and pork chops at family gatherings. "I was taught to enjoy food, not to fear it," Banks recalls. She developed healthier habits, too, and began working out with her mother's exercise group at the age of six. After her grandmother passed away from lung cancer, Banks also vowed never to smoke.

Banks confesses that she was somewhat of a "mean girl" in middle school. "I was popular, gossipy," she recalls, adding, "and if I didn't want one of the other girls to be in the clique anymore, for whatever tiny little reason, I voted her out." When Banks attended Immaculate Heart High School in Los Angeles, however, she found herself on the other end of the social food chain. A sudden growth spurt left her tall and gawky, and her classmates gave her cruel nicknames such as "Giraffe" and "Lightbulb Head." "I went from being the popular girl who looked normal, to being considered a freak," Banks remembers. Nevertheless, Banks says that the teasing and abuse taught her the importance of kindness. "It turned out that the best things [to happen to me] in my life were to be made fun of, and to have no friends, and to feel miserable every single day."

Modeling Career

By 1989, at the age of 17, Banks had outgrown her awkward phase and begun to resemble the tall, curvy, caramel-skinned and green-eyed beauty who would light up runways and magazine covers for years to come. However, her first attempts to find a modeling agency were met with rejection and discrimination. Banks remembers that one agency said she looked "too ethnic" and another said that it "already had a Black woman and didn't want another."

Signing on With Elite Model Management

In 1990, while still in high school, Banks landed a contract with Elite Model Management, the largest modeling agency in the world. Later that year, she shot her first print piece for Seventeen magazine. After graduating from high school in 1991, Banks enrolled at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, but decided to forego college when Elite offered to send her to Paris for high-fashion runway modeling.

Banks rose swiftly through the ranks of fashion modeling to become one of the world's top supermodels. She booked 25 runway shows while in Paris in 1991, an unprecedented feat for a newcomer to the industry. But by the mid-1990s, Banks began to gain weight, a forbidden sin in the world of rail-thin clothing models. Unwilling to starve herself to achieve the desired physique for high-fashion models, Banks decided to return to the United States and switch to swimwear and lingerie modeling, where curvier models are more welcome. "I made my living being 20 or 30 pounds heavier than the average model," Banks says. "And that's where I got famous. Victoria's Secret said I sold more bras and panties than anybody else, and I was traipsing down that runway with 30 pounds more booty than the other girls."

'Sport Illustrated' to Victoria's Secret

In 1996, Banks became the first Black woman to appear on the cover of GQ. A year later, she became the first African American woman to appear on the cover of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition, as well as the first Black woman to be featured in Victoria's Secret lingerie catalogue. She signed lucrative contracts with Cover Girl and Victoria's Secret, becoming a staple of both companies' advertising campaigns and runway shows. Named to People magazine's 50 Most Beautiful People list numerous times, Banks received the prestigious Michael Award for Supermodel of the Year in 1997, and also won two Teen Choice Awards for Favorite Supermodel.

Banks returned to the front of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition in 2019, 23 years after she first graced its cover.

Acting Work

In addition to her modeling, Banks began pursuing an acting career in the 1990s. She made her debut in 1993 with a seven-episode stint on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, and enjoyed a prominent role in the 1995 drama Higher Learning. In 2000 Banks appeared in a trio of popular films: Love & Basketball, Coyote Ugly and the made-for-television movie Life Size. Later TV work included appearances in Gossip Girl and Glee.

Reality TV and Talk Show

'America's Next Top Model'

In 2003 Banks ventured into the world of reality TV when she created, produced and hosted the UPN show America's Next Top Model. The show, which pits aspiring models against each other in a competition for the label of America's Next Top Model, was UPN's highest-rated show through its first six seasons. In 2006 Top Model was chosen to headline the newly created CW television network. The show, with more than 20 seasons under its belt, continues to draw enormous television audiences.

'The Tyra Banks Show'

Banks expanded into daytime television with her own talk show, The Tyra Show, in 2005. The show's most famous moment came in February 2007, shortly after several unflattering pictures of Banks in a bathing suit surfaced in tabloid magazines. Banks marched onstage wearing the same bathing suit and told critics to "Kiss my fat ass!" She picked up a Daytime Emmy Award for her work on the show in 2008 — a feat she repeated the following year as well. In 2010 Banks said goodbye to her talk show after five years on the air. She told People magazine that she decided to end her program to focus on "bringing positive images of women to the big screen."

'America's Got Talent'

Banks debuted a new talk show in September 2015 called FABLife, though she announced her departure just two months later. She later resurfaced to host the reality competition series America's Got Talent in 2017, as a replacement for Nick Cannon, and spent two seasons in the role.

'Dancing with the Stars'

Banks took over hosting duties from Tom Bergeron and Erin Andrews for the 29th season of Dancing with the Stars. She also served as executive producer.

Book and Businesswoman

In 2011 Banks published the best-selling novel Modelland, based on her life and experiences in the industry, and launched a style and beauty website called typeF.com. She also enrolled at Harvard Business School around this time, completing her special course for CEOs and other top executives in early 2012. The model-turned-entertainment-mogul has since founded the TYRA Beauty cosmetics line.

Personal Life & Son

Banks, who rarely discusses her romantic life in public, has been involved with several celebrities over the years, including director John Singleton and basketball player Chris Webber. In January 2016, Banks and her long-time boyfriend, Norwegian photographer Erik Asla, welcomed a baby boy, York Banks Asla. Banks had previously revealed her trouble with infertility and their son was delivered via a surrogate mother. In 2017, Banks and Asla called off their five-year relationship on amicable terms.

Banks is active in a number of social and charitable causes. One of her personal missions has been to help young women deal with self-esteem issues. As early as 1992, when she was only 19 years old, Banks funded a scholarship to help young Black women attend her alma mater, the private Immaculate Heart High School in Los Angeles. In 1998, she wrote Tyra's Beauty Inside & Out, a book aimed at inspiring young women, and a year later she founded TZONE, a foundation aimed at developing teenage girls' independence and self-esteem.

Источник: https://www.biography.com

Tyra Banks on another season of 'America's Next Top Model'

Banks spoke about the possibility of another season of her reality show.

"America's Next Top Model" fans could be in for a serious treat if Tyra Banks gets her way.

The former model, entrepreneur and businesswoman, who recently launched her experiential model-themed amusement park, ModelLand, says she's open to and already thinking about coming back for another season of her popular reality series.

"You know, we've done 25 cycles of 'America's Next Top Model' and I feel that we that we should at least end at 25," Banks told ABC Audio. "At least do that."

Banks, who created the reality competition series in 2003, served as host for 23 seasons.

The series aired on various networks over the course of 15 years.

Now, almost two years after its last episode, Banks says she's ready to bring it all back.

"So, we're seeing if that could happen," she shared. "We shall see."


ABC News
Источник: https://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Culture/tyra-banks-season-americas-top-model/story?id=69281087

Tyra Banks admits her past ‘America’s Next Top Model’ behaviour was ‘off’, insensitive

Tyra Banks has broken her silence and addressed the America’s Next Top Model (ANTM) clips that resurfaced of tyra banks model search last week and sparked controversy on social media.

“Been seeing the tyra banks model search about the insensitivity of some past ANTM moments and I agree with you,” Banks tweeted Friday. “Looking back, those were some really off choices. Appreciate your honest feedback and am sending so much love and virtual hugs.”

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One of the major videos that sparked backlash against Banks on Twitter last week was from Season 6 of the aspiring model competition show.

Banks told ANTM contestant Dani Evans that she would never be a model unless she fixes the gap in her teeth.

“So Danielle, you went to the dentist but you refused to have your gap closed. Do you really think you can have a CoverGirl contract with a gap in your mouth?” Tyra said in the 2006 episode.

“Yes, why not?” Evans responded.

“This is all people see. It’s easy, breezy, beautiful CoverGirl,” Banks said while imitating that she has a gap in her teeth with her finger. “It’s not marketable.”

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Evans, who ended up winning the season, posted a video on Instagram and explained that the now-viral moment was played up for TV in 2006.

Evans said she wasn’t going to speak on the moment until model Slick Woods reached out to her.

“I honestly didn’t feel it was necessary until late last night when I received a message from Slick Woods,” Evans said. “I knew in that moment after reading her words that I have a responsibility to address what really happened and to speak my truth.”

She explained that the producers had never told her that Banks wanted her to get her gap closed.

“She (Tyra) looks off camera to production, which none of you guys ever see. I look off stage, camera, right to production. Ken Mok gives me one of these (shrugs shoulders),” Evans said. “In that moment I knew what was happening. I knew that I was basically set up and not being told that Tyra wants me to get my gap closed so that it’s good for TV.”

Evans also revealed that they filmed the conversation multiple times to get it right for TV.

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Fenty model Slick Woods, who also has a gap between her front teeth, posted the viral clip to Instagram and wrote, “No one should ever talk to you like that @danievans1.”

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“That episode f–ked up little simone/slick so that’s how y’all feel @tyrabanks @miss_jalexander???” Slick Woods added.

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Another moment that shocked viewers was from Season 4 when Banks eliminated two models and she yelled at Tiffany Richardson for not showing the same upset emotion that Rebecca Epley did.

After Banks announced that both models were eliminated from the competition, Richardson tried to cheer up the other crying models by hugging them and making jokes.

“Can you guys stand in front of me? I just want to say one more thing to you,” Banks said. “Rebecca, I admire your emotion right now. It shows to me that this was something that is very important to you.”

“Tiffany, I’m extremely disappointed in you. This is a joke to you,” Banks continued. “You’ve been through anger management, you’ve been through your grandmother getting her lights turned off to buy you a swimsuit for this competition and you go over there and you joke and you laugh?

“This is serious to these girls, and it should be serious to you,” Banks added.

“Looks can be deceiving. I’m hurt. I am,” Richardson told Banks. “But I can’t change it Tyra. I’m sick of crying about stuff that I cannot change. I’m sick of being disappointed. I’m sick of all of it.”

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As the pair argued back and forth, Banks became irritated and yelled: “Do you know that you had a possibility to win? Do you know that all of America is rooting for you?”

The argument continued and Banks yelled: “Stop it! I have never in my life yelled at a girl like this. When my mother yells like this it’s because she loves me.

“I was rooting for you! We were all rooting for you!” Banks says, reciting the memorable line from the series that has turned into a meme.

Tyra Banks admits her past ‘America’s Next Top Model’ behaviour was ‘off’, insensitive - image

ANTM producer Ken Mok issued an apology on Twitter after Banks addressed the criticism from the viral clips.

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“Want midland states bank routing number rockford il reiterate what @tyrabanks said. I look at some of those #ANTM moments and cringe,” Mok tweeted. “Just a FYI – the entire creative team made the choices in those shows – not just Tyra. So please feel free to yell at me for some of the worst moments in ANTM [email protected] Apologies to all.”

Banks created ANTM in 2003 and hosted the show for every season, which they referred to as cycles, from Season 1-22. She took a break from Season 23 as Rita Ora hosted but returned to host Season 24 in 2018.

It is currently unclear if ANTM will have a 25th season.

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© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Источник: https://globalnews.ca/news/6934052/tyra-banks-addresses-americas-next-top-model/
  • After old, controversial scenes from America's Next Top Model went viral online, former host Tyra Banks addressedthe intense criticism.
  • On Twitter, the supermodel wrote that she agrees with those expressing concern and appreciates the "honest feedback" she has received.
  • In one clip, Banks and great southern cafe seaside reality competition show's judges pressure a contestant to close the gap in her teeth, implying that she wouldn't be able to get a CoverGirl contract otherwise.

After several controversial clips from America's Next Top Model went viral on Twitter, supermodel and host Tyra Banks responded to the criticism.

"Been seeing the posts about the insensitivity of some past ANTM moments tyra banks model search I agree with you," she wrote on Twitter last Friday. "Looking back, those were some really off choices. Appreciate your honest feedback and am sending so much love and virtual hugs."

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In one of the tyra banks model search clips, Banks and the panel of judges pressure 2006 contestant Danielle Evans to close the gap in her teeth in order to gain more widespread success as a model.

"So, Danielle, you went to the dentist, but you refused to have your gap closed," Banks says to the budding model in the clip. "Do you really think you can have a CoverGirl contract with a gap in your mouth?"

"Yes, why not?" Evans replies.

"This is all people see," Banks retorts, putting a finger between her two front teeth. "Easy, breezy, beautiful, CoverGirl. It's not marketable."

Evans, now a model represented by Elite, has also responded to the resurfaced material. In an Instagram video, she says, "This is not a video to discuss my relationship with Tyra. This is a video for me to speak my truth and provide clarity."

She goes on to say that she understands the weight that Banks's words potentially had on girls who watched the show at the time, but explains that looks are not what make one beautiful.

"You're beautiful, and I'm not talking about a physical feature," she says. "It doesn't matter if you have a gap, stacked teeth, straight teeth, it matters not. It doesn't matter if you're Black, Brown, white, indifferent, other, it doesn't matter. What makes you beautiful is in here."

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Источник: https://www.harpersbazaar.com/celebrity/latest/a32460695/tyra-banks-response-backlack-americas-next-top-model/

The Tyra Banks Matriarchy: A Scholar's Take on America's Next Top Model

ANTM cycle 1 banner_edited-2.jpg

The cast of America's Next Top Model's first cycle, which premiered on UPN on May 20, 2003.

Ten years ago, on May 20, 2003, the first episode of America's Next Top Model aired on UPN.

Over the course of its run, the dramatic Tyra Banks-hosted modeling competition—in which contestants try tyra banks model search out-fierce one another on the runway and in photo shoots to win a contract at the end of the season—has hauled in some of UPN's (and later The CW's) biggest ratings, reimagined itself through some scheduling and format revamps, and hosted an ever-evolving lineup of celebrity judges.

And through it all, Rhonda Loverude has been there, faithfully tuning into every episode.

Many of us know someone who's seemingly obsessed with ANTM, but it's safe to say few people in the world have thought as deeply or as critically about the show as Loverude has. Loverude, who estimates that she's seen every installment of every nine- to 13-episode cycle of America's Next Top Model "no fewer than 15 to 25 times each," handed in a citi simplicity card online payment doctoral dissertation titled "America's Next Top Model Is. : Enforcing or Resisting Hegemonic Heterosexuality" to the faculty of the University of Minnesota's School of Journalism 3rd battalion 5th marines 1st marine division Mass Communication in 2011.

Even after a grueling, nearly two-year process of researching and writing her ANTM opus, she's kept up with the show through what she calls the "dumb cycles" of recent years—and still watches Top Model marathons when they air, reciting lines along with the contestants. So in honor of ANTM's 10th birthday, I chatted with Loverude about the show's cultural legacy, its representations of gender, power, and sexuality in the United States, and how to do the ultimate liberal-arts reading of the series that taught America how to smize.

Responses have been edited for clarity and length.


So when America's Next Top Model came on the air in 2003, why do you think it became such a phenomenon? What was it putting on TV that was so revolutionary?

It was something different at the time; there weren't a lot of modeling shows. There were plenty of makeover shows—weight-loss makeover shows, home makeover shows—but this was the first one where you got to see young women plucked out of obscurity. Like in Cycle Two, there was Shandi, who was a Walgreens clerk. And she was just. nerdy-looking! And I say that as a fellow nerd. But she ended up which island in the keys has the best beaches gorgeous and a really good model.

In your dissertation, you identified Shandi as one of the archetypes that often shows up on the series—

Yes! The Odd, Seemingly Unattractive Woman.

Yeah! I love that. Your academic work discusses the sorts of packaged representations of women that America's Next Top Model often depicts. Can you talk a little more about putting together your inventory of the "archetypes" or "stock characters" that repeatedly show up on ANTM?

I watched all the cycles repeatedly and I was seeing certain types of people repeated—even if, say, the Odd, Seemingly Unattractive Woman types didn't always look similar to one another. Not everyone looked like Shandi. Tyra banks model search I could see what the producers were doing: They were, in a way, pigeonholing all these different women into these archetypes. So that's what I came up with—I watched every cycle and it was like "OK, well, there's The Bitch."

They always had a Bitch, every cycle. And then there were always plenty of women with a Tragic Backstory. Or someone who's Hiding a Secret Illness. I always thought the Bitch lasted too long in most of the cycles. But, honestly, that makes sense—the Bitch creates drama. Like Camille, from Cycle Two, could have been eliminated a lot earlier than she was.

There's always a Young Naïve Girl, in every cycle. The Australian and British versions had the Young Naïve Girl, too. There was always an Extremely Religious Woman—that was one that carried over, too. And I didn't see it every cycle, but the Badass but Nice Woman—she was on a fair amount. The Odd, Seemingly Unattractive Woman was in every cycle, and so was the Barbie Doll Lookalike/Actalike. To me, anyway, it always seemed like they chose one person who was very commercial-looking.

You studied some other English-speaking countries' spinoff Next Top Model shows, too. Do those archetypes show up in the other, international versions?

Some do. Some of the British and Australian cycles had archetypes that were distinctly British or Australian. In the Australian version, there was the Joker—the woman who loved to prank others. She was always playing jokes on the other women in the house. Another archetype that came up in the Australian version was the Unstable Woman—the woman who cried seemingly constantly, who fell apart in an instant. And the Insecure Girl, the girl who really lacked confidence. Unfortunately, those two were often the same contestant. Australia also had the Boring Blonde Mannequin.

And then there's the Party Girl in Australia's Top Model. You didn't see her so much in the American version; drinking was pretty frowned-upon in the American version. But the Australian version and the British version, when they would move into their house, they had fully stocked liquor cabinets. Which you never saw on the American version! I guess you could argue that there were some party girls in the American version, but it wasn't as blatant; it wasn't celebrated. If that was the case, the judges were very upset. "You've been drinking; you don't look good." But it was much more acceptable in the other versions.

I feel terrible saying these things, by the way! [Laughs] I'm not usually one to judge women so harshly. But I had to, to write about this.

You mentioned that standards of beauty were observably different on the international versions of the show. What did you notice about other countries' standards tyra banks model search what constitutes a beautiful woman?

It varied cycle to cycle. In the American version, yes, they would cast some plus-size women. But generally, they wanted very thin women, and you couldn't be too short. They did finally do a petite cycle in Cycle 13—and as a very short person, I was like, well, it's about damn time!

But in the British and the Australian versions, their standards of beauty—at least as you'd learn about them from watching the show—were that they could be a little bit curvier. They still liked tall, thin, young women, but you could be curvier and still have an opportunity to succeed.

America's Next Top Model is humane society west valley in 170 countries around the world. So let's say you're someone who's never been to the U.S. What do you think you would learn—rightly or wrongly—about the United States from watching 10 years of America's Next Top Model?

Oh, boy.

I think if you watched 10 years of ANTM and had never been exposed to America before, you'd think that in the United States you absolutely need to be thin. And that you can't have a very big chest, because then it's scandalous. [Note: In her dissertation, Loverude mentions that contestants with large breasts "often hear (comments that) have to do with their appearance being more suitable to men's magazines, not high fashion."] And that you have to exercise all the time. There were a lot of clips—especially in Cycles Two and Four—of the women exercising. They had a trainer that came in who was always trying to kick their ass.

But as far as standards of beauty in the U.S., you'd learn that you've got to be thin, and you don't want to be short. You're better off if you have light skin and lighter-colored hair. They repeatedly, each time there's a makeover, bleach someone's hair crazy-blonde. You'd learn that it's better to be tall, and that curves are very rarely considered good—at least in the modeling world. If this is the only exposure you have to the United States and you're a curvy woman, you're going to think you're hideous. And that's not totally fair, because Tyra herself is curvy—she's busty for a model. But she's also very tall, and for the most part, she's very slim, as well.

I think you would think the norm in American society is that homosexuality is just very openly accepted in this country, too. On the show, over and over again, the gay men who help in every aspect of the show, Tyra repeatedly tells the contestants that "without the gay men, we wouldn't be able to do this." In the ANTM world, it's very accepted.

In your dissertation, you raise the question of how Britain's, Australia's, and America's Next Top Model "enforce tyra banks model search resist hegemony." That's a huge, heady topic, of course, but what are just a few of the ways ANTM addresses hegemony, like hegemonic masculinity or patriarchy?

Well, the open acceptance of gays and lesbians. Certainly what I noticed in the Australian and British versions was that being gay wasn't that big of a deal; it wasn't something the host would point out. Whereas Tyra pointed it out repeatedly. But in terms of hegemony in the American version, there was a hegemonic construct on America's Next Top Model that didn't necessarily match up with U.S. society as a whole: On the show, gay people were respected and revered.

There was a hegemonic construct on 'America's Next Top Model' that didn't necessarily match up with U.S. society as a whole: On the show, gay people were respected and revered.

Tall, skinny, sort of nerdy-looking girls were eagerly embraced, too, whereas they might otherwise be ignored in average U.S. society.

And in terms of patriarchy—well, America's Next Top Model, to me, always seemed like an example of a matriarchy. Tyra's in charge—Tyra edits the photos, she counsels the women, she's sort of the tough-love mom. The show was essentially Tyra's idea, so she was in charge of everything. You know: She would assign a new look to a contestant on Makeover Day, and if that look wasn't working, Mr. Jay [Manuel] and Miss J. [Alexander] would always call Tyra to get her—well, you could say her opinion, but I would say it's her permission—to do something differently from how she'd intended. But I think that's part of what I liked about the show; it did seem like a matriarchal society. The hegemonic construct she created was that women were in charge here. Women and gay men.

Flips the script a little, doesn't it?

Yeah, it does. In a good way.

Certain parts of the show have just become entrenched in pop culture—like "smize," for instance, which became pretty common jargon once Tyra said it on Top Model. What do you think made ANTM resonate with American viewers the way it did?

It's a Cinderella story. Someone who doesn't have any experience modeling, has maybe been considered sort of an ugly duckling for a long time, gets on the show and gets a makeover, gets to put on amazing clothes and makeup, and then gets to be in beautiful photographs.

I think another part of its appeal is seeing the behind-the-scenes of what it takes to be a model. It says to its audience, OK, now when you look at pictures in magazines, you'll understand what goes on and what goes into making the person look that good. You'll know that the person isn't going to look that good in real life, necessarily, because she hasn't been Photoshopped or isn't wearing professional makeup. You'll know when you see ads that it took a lot to make a [model] look like that—so ultimately it's OK if you don't.

That's counterintuitive, for a show about competitive modeling to make viewers feel better about themselves.

Absolutely. I mean, north america mountains map the other hand, it encouraged some really obnoxious things, as well. But that's why I've liked it so much, and I think why other people like it too. It gives you a glimpse of someone succeeding in an industry they were never supposed to succeed in. It's nice to sometimes see women who have likely been considered nerdy-looking their whole lives be considered beautiful.

Источник: https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2013/05/the-tyra-banks-matriarchy-a-scholars-take-on-i-americas-next-top-model-i/276027/

A former supermodel, Tyra Banks turned her runway success into a multimedia brand and worked at the helm of two successful TV series simultaneously, 'America's Next Top Model,' and 'The Tyra Banks Show.'

Who Is Tyra Banks?

Tyra Banks was a leading international fashion model and the first Black woman to land on the cover of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue. She later hosted the reality TV program America's Next Top Model and her own daytime talk show, for which she won two Emmy Awards. Tyra banks model search has continued to expand her business interests, launching her own cosmetics line in 2014. Staring in 2017, Banks took over Nick Cannon's hosting duties on America's Got Talent

Early Life

Tyra Lynne Banks was born on December 4, 1973, in Inglewood, California. Her father, Don Banks, was a computer consultant and her mother, Carolyn, was a medical photographer. Banks' parents divorced when she was only six years old, but she says that she was too young for the divorce to negatively affect her. "As far as I could see, I had it made," Banks remembers. "I stayed with Mommy on the weekdays and Daddy on the weekends. I had two birthday parties, two Christmases. Double the presents, double the love."

Banks says that she developed a love for food — and not always healthy food — from a very young age, devouring fried chicken, candied yams and pork chops at family gatherings. "I was taught to enjoy food, not to fear it," Banks recalls. She developed healthier habits, too, and began working out with her mother's exercise group at the age of six. After her grandmother passed away from lung cancer, Banks also vowed never to smoke.

Banks confesses that she was somewhat of a "mean girl" in middle school. "I was popular, gossipy," she recalls, adding, "and if I didn't want one of the other girls to be in the clique anymore, for whatever tiny little reason, I voted her out." When Banks attended Immaculate Heart High School in Los Angeles, however, she found herself on the other end of the social food chain. A sudden growth spurt left her tall and gawky, and her classmates gave her cruel nicknames such as "Giraffe" and "Lightbulb Head." "I went from being the popular girl who looked normal, to being considered a freak," Banks remembers. Nevertheless, Banks says that the teasing and abuse taught her the importance of kindness. "It turned out that the best things [to happen to me] in my life were to be made fun of, and to have no friends, and to feel miserable every single day."

Modeling Career

By 1989, at the age of 17, Banks had outgrown her awkward phase and begun to resemble the tall, curvy, caramel-skinned and green-eyed beauty who would light up runways and magazine covers for years to come. However, her first attempts to find a modeling agency were met with rejection and discrimination. Banks remembers that one agency said she looked "too ethnic" and another said that it "already had a Black woman and didn't want another."

Signing on With Elite Model Management

In 1990, while still in high school, Banks landed a contract with Elite Model Management, the largest modeling agency in the world. Later that year, she shot her first print piece for Seventeen magazine. After graduating from high school in 1991, Banks enrolled at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, but decided to forego college when Elite offered to send her to Paris for high-fashion runway modeling.

Banks rose swiftly through the ranks of fashion how to pay with apple pay on amazon to become one of the world's top supermodels. She booked 25 runway shows while in Paris in 1991, an unprecedented feat for a newcomer to the industry. But by the mid-1990s, Banks began to gain weight, a forbidden sin in the world of rail-thin clothing models. Unwilling to starve herself to achieve the desired physique for high-fashion models, Banks decided to return to the United States and switch to swimwear and lingerie modeling, where curvier models are more welcome. "I made my living being 20 or 30 pounds heavier than the average model," Banks says. "And that's where I got famous. Victoria's Secret said I sold more bras and panties than anybody else, and I was traipsing down that runway with 30 pounds more booty than the other girls."

'Sport Illustrated' to Victoria's Secret

In 1996, Banks became the first Black woman to appear on the cover of GQ. A year later, she became the first African American woman to appear on the cover of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition, as well as the first Black woman to be featured in Victoria's Secret lingerie catalogue. She signed lucrative contracts with Cover Girl and Victoria's Secret, becoming a staple of both companies' advertising campaigns and runway shows. Named to People magazine's 50 Most Beautiful People list numerous times, Banks received the prestigious Michael Award for Supermodel of the Year in 1997, and also won two Teen Choice Awards for Favorite Supermodel.

Banks returned to the front of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition in 2019, 23 years after she first graced its cover.

Acting Work

In addition to her modeling, Banks began pursuing an acting career in the 1990s. She made her debut in 1993 with a seven-episode stint on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, and enjoyed a prominent role in the 1995 drama Higher Learning. In 2000 Banks appeared in a trio of popular films: Love & Basketball, Coyote Ugly and the made-for-television movie Life Size. Later TV work included appearances in Gossip Girl and Glee.

Reality TV and Talk Show

'America's Next Top Model'

In 2003 Banks ventured into the world of reality TV when she created, produced and hosted the UPN show America's Next Top Model. The show, which pits aspiring models against each other in a competition for the label of America's Next Top Model, was UPN's highest-rated show through its first six seasons. In 2006 Top Model was chosen to headline the newly created CW television network. The show, with more than 20 seasons under its belt, continues to draw enormous television audiences.

'The Tyra Banks Show'

Banks expanded into daytime television with tyra banks model search own talk show, The Tyra Show, in 2005. The show's most famous moment came in February 2007, shortly after several unflattering pictures of Banks in a bathing suit surfaced in tabloid magazines. Banks marched onstage wearing the same bathing suit and told critics to "Kiss my fat ass!" She picked up a Daytime Emmy Award for her work on the show in 2008 — a feat she repeated the following year as well. In 2010 Banks said goodbye to her talk show after five years on the air. She told People magazine that she decided to end her program to focus on "bringing positive images of women to the big screen."

'America's Got Talent'

Banks tyra banks model search a new talk show in September 2015 called FABLife, though she announced her departure just two months later. She later resurfaced to host the reality competition series America's Got Talent in 2017, as a replacement for Nick Cannon, and spent two seasons in the role.

'Dancing with the Stars'

Banks took over hosting duties from Tom Bergeron and Erin Andrews for the 29th season of Dancing with the Stars. She also served as executive producer.

Book and Businesswoman

In 2011 Banks published the best-selling novel Modelland, based on her life and experiences in the industry, and launched a style and beauty website called typeF.com. She also enrolled at Harvard Business School around this time, completing her special course for CEOs and other top executives in early 2012. The model-turned-entertainment-mogul has since founded the TYRA Beauty cosmetics line.

Personal Life & Son

Banks, who rarely discusses her romantic life in public, has been involved with several tyra banks model search over the years, including director John Singleton and basketball player Chris Webber. In January 2016, Banks and her long-time boyfriend, Norwegian photographer Erik Asla, welcomed a baby boy, York Banks Asla. Banks had previously revealed her trouble with infertility and their son was delivered via a surrogate mother. In 2017, Banks and Asla called off their five-year relationship on amicable terms.

Banks is active in a number of social and charitable causes. One of her personal missions has been to help young women deal with self-esteem issues. As early as 1992, when she was only 19 years old, Banks funded a scholarship to help young Black women attend her alma mater, the private Immaculate Heart High School in Los Angeles. In 1998, she wrote Tyra's Beauty Inside & Out, a book aimed at inspiring young women, and a year later she founded TZONE, a foundation aimed at developing teenage girls' independence and self-esteem.

Источник: https://www.biography.com

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