map of america and mexico

Between 1849 and 1857, the Army Corps of Topographical Engineers marked and mapped the U.S.-Mexico boundary and published a report on natural features of. Find the perfect usa border map mexico stock photo. Huge collection, amazing choice, 100+ million high quality, affordable RF and RM images. Map shows mid-nineteenth century geography, cities, territories, and political borders in the United States, Mexico, Central America.

Map of america and mexico -

First-ever Map and Priority Restoration Areas of Border Wall through Arizona and New Mexico Released

The first publicly available map documenting the U.S.-Mexico border wall through New Mexico and Arizona was released Tuesday. The map depicts completed sections of border wall as well as other related construction activities and is the most accurate, detailed and up-to-date documentation of new sections of border wall completed during the Trump Administration.

The map, produced by the nonprofit Wildlands Network, was developed through remote sensing and extensive on-the-ground fieldwork to assess what was completed and the progress of sections that were not completed. The Great Old Broads for Wilderness assisted in on-the-ground surveys through portions of Arizona.

AZ & NM Border Barriers 2021 v1-1.jpg

Following the April announcement by the Biden Administration that it would end border wall construction contracts and shift funding to restoration, the map is an important resource for understanding where remediation and removal of border walls should be prioritized.

“The borderlands have long been an essential region for the continental movement of wildlife,” said Myles Traphagen, borderlands coordinator for Wildlands Network who led the mapping effort. “Unfortunately, border wall construction has impacted some of the highest value wildlife habitat and areas that are most important for wildlife migration in the region.”

In addition to the map, Wildlands Network has also released a StoryMap that highlights six priority restoration areas in Arizona and New Mexico. In New Mexico, these include sites in the Whitewater Mountains and the Carrizalillo Mountains. The priority restoration areas in Arizona include sites in the Patagonia Mountains, Pajarito Mountains and San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge – all of which are in desperate need of immediate restoration.

“Following the Biden Administration’s announcement that remaining funds would be shifted to restoration, there were many questions about how much money remained, who would lead restoration, and where restoration would be prioritized,” said Michael Dax, Western program director for Wildlands Network. “For Arizona and New Mexico, we believe these are the areas where restoration must occur to protect the unique natural resource values, including wildlife migration.”

Numerous species including deer, pronghorn, bear, javelina and mountain lion have been impacted by the wall, which has isolated these binational populations. Additionally, a jaguar was recently spotted in the Sky Islands of southeastern Arizona—only the seventh sighting in the past 25 years. Connectivity between the U.S. and Mexico will be essential for the species’ long-term recovery, especially as more animals attempt to travel north into historically occupied habitats.

IMG_1477_Credit Myles Traphagen, Wildlands Network.jpg

Beginning in March 2019, Wildlands Network started mapping the proposed border wall projects from court documents that described the planned locations. Over the ensuing two years, the team used drones, ground-based photos and GPS to track the project.

When construction was halted on January 20, 2021, Wildlands Network marked the endpoints of construction to ensure that the stop work order had not been violated. At that point, staff systematically drove nearly every mile of the border in New Mexico and Arizona to document cases of severe environmental destruction and hazards, as well as to identify locations where the wall had not been completed and other gaps in the wall that wildlife can use. 

“We found that there was a lot of shoddy construction and many places where contractors had not figured out how to deal with drainages that are prone to flash floods when strong desert downpours occur,” says Traphagen. “We also found that most of the flood gates installed that are designed to be opened during periods of heavy rains were welded shut, with no possibility to open them in a timely fashion should flooding occur.” 

Wildlands Network, which focuses on the protection of large-scale habitat and corridors for wildlife in North America, is working to ensure wildlife can safely traverse political boundaries, like the U.S.-Mexico border and other human-made barriers to ensure their natural movements.

“There has been a lot of misinformation around the border wall and its construction,” says Dax. “Our hope is that this map will be a resource for the Biden Administration and congressional leaders when directing funding towards remediation and restoration of the borderlands, and we look forward to working with leaders to restore this ecologically important landscape.”

###

Contact:

Michael Dax, Western Program Director
[email protected], 518-598-3442

Resources:

  • To view the interactive map, click here

  • To read the StoryMap, click here

  • To access a folder of press images, click here

Since 1991, Wildlands Network has been committed to reconnecting, restoring and rewilding North America so that life—in all its diversity—can thrive. Our work is founded in science, driven by fieldwork and furthered through strategic policy and partnerships. We envision a North America where nature is undivided, and where people coexist in harmony with our native plants and animals.

Border wallArizonaNew Mexico

Источник: https://wildlandsnetwork.org/news/first-ever-map-of-border-wall-released

37 maps that explain how America is a nation of immigrants

American politicians, and Americans themselves, love to call themselves “a nation of immigrants”: a place where everyone’s family has, at some point, chosen to come to seek freedom or a better life. America has managed to maintain that self-image through the forced migration of millions of African slaves, restrictive immigration laws based on fears of “inferior” races, and nativist movements that encouraged immigrants to assimilate or simply leave.

But while the reality of America’s immigrant heritage is more complicated than the myth, it’s still a fundamental truth of the country’s history. It’s impossible to understand the country today without knowing who’s been kept out, who’s been let in, and how they’ve been treated once they arrive.


Where we come from

1) We’re all immigrants

US Census Bureau

This map from the 2000 census colors each county according to which country most of its residents cite as their “ancestry.” What might be most surprising about this map is the predominance of light yellow in Appalachia; in those counties, more people say their ancestry is simply “American” than anything else. But this is a strikingly recent phenomenon: the number of people saying their ancestry was “American” nearly doubled from 1990 to 2000. It’s amazing that in a country that’s been around for more than 200 years — with many family lineages having lived in the New World for even longer — most people are still able to identify their ancestry based on the countries in which their families lived before they immigrated to the United States.


2) The very first American migration

Even the first Americans were immigrants — it’s generally accepted that they came across “Beringia” (the land that’s now the Bering Strait, the body of water between Russia and Alaska) at least 20,000 years ago (and possibly as long as 30,000 years ago). But scientists are still trying to piece together when the first Americans came through Beringia; how many of them there were; and whether they came all at once, or in multiple waves.

This map, from a 2007 paper, is based on an analysis of mitochondrial DNA — which children inherit only from their mother, making it easier to trace one line back for many generations. The researchers hypothesize that the group that came to Beringia from Asia, approximately 25,000 years ago, actually stayed in Beringia for some time before some of them came through to the Americas. Then, however — according to this analysis — they populated the Americas fairly quickly, spreading as far south as Chile by 15,000 years ago. The analysis also suggests that some early Americans migrated back to Asia from Beringia, while other, newer waves of immigrants crossed to America.


3) America has more immigrants than anybody

Worldmapper.org

Later waves of European immigration killed off most of the first Americans (largely through European diseases, which traveled through the Americas much more quickly than European humans did). That set the stage for European Americans to rebrand the United States, in particular (where indigenous populations were almost completely “replaced”), as a “nation of immigrants.” Even today, America is still home to more total immigrants than any other country in the world. In this map, each country’s size is distorted to reflect the size of its immigrant population. It’s based on 2005 data, but a 2013 UN report shows that 19.8 percent of the world’s international migrants live in the United States.


4) ...but as a share of the population, the US doesn’t crack the top 10

As much as American politicians pat themselves on the back for representing “the most welcoming country in the world,” there are smaller countries that have been more open to immigrants in recent decades. So on this chart from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), which measures the percentage of each country’s population that was made up of immigrants in 2000 (the orange dot) and 2010 (the blue bar), America doesn’t even hit the top 10. Some of the countries that outrank the United States are tiny — it’s much easier for 40 percent of Luxembourg’s population to be immigrants, since the country has only 540,000 people, than it would be for the United States — but medium-size countries like Canada, Australia, and Spain also outrank the United States.


5) The simplest explanation of how immigration to America has changed

mexico germany immigration GIFPew Research Center

If this feature were called “A nation of immigrants in one map,” this is the one we’d show you. The bottom line: before 1965, Germany sent more immigrants to America than anyone else; after 1965, Mexico did.

Here’s why: from World War I to 1965, the immigration system was designed, essentially, to keep the United States white. Rice University sociologist Stephen Klineberg has called it “unbelievable in its clarity of racism.” Each country was given a certain quota of immigrants who were allowed to come to the United States each year, based on who’d been in the country in 1890.

Combined with existing laws that prevented any Asian Americans from coming into the country, the laws of the 1920s basically froze the demographics of the immigrant population in place until 1965.


6) The Danish Utahns, and other immigrant enclaves

where immigrants live@MetricMaps

This GIF, compiled by internet hero @MetricMaps, tracks where immigrants from different countries have settled in the United States. The result is an exhaustive portrait of more than two dozen different native countries and regions. Some ancestry groups pop up in interesting places, revealing forgotten pockets of American history — the Danish population in Utah, for example, is the result of an extremely early wave of Danish conversion to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons).


Forced migration, then and now

7) Forced migration built America

David Eltis and David Richardson/Atlas of the Transatlantic Slave Trade, reprinted with permission of Yale University Press

The American myth about “a nation of immigrants” excludes millions of forced migrants to America from Africa, who were brought to the US over two centuries of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. It’s hard to overstate how much slaves built America: according to historian Steven Deyle, the value of all slaves in 1860 was seven times the value of all currency then in circulation in the United States. Slave labor built the agrarian economy of the South and fed the cotton mills of the industrializing North. But slaves had no way to become citizens, build wealth, or bring their families — they had no opportunity to practice the self-reliance that America often expects of its immigrants.


8) The first illegal migrations were of trafficked slaves

The forced migration of Africans to America also represents the first unauthorized migration to the United States. The Constitution banned the “importation” (trafficking) of slaves into the United States after 1809, but black-market slave trading continued until the Civil War. According to historian David Eltis of Emory University, 1.5 million Africans arrived in the Americas after the countries they landed in had theoretically banned the slave trade. Because there were no restrictions on voluntary migration to the United States until the 1880s, these were the first people to come to the country illegally.

The Atlas of the Transatlantic Slave Trade documents 78,360 slaves landing in mainland North America from 1800 to 1865 — about 20 percent of all arrivals over the 200 years of the slave trade. (Since slave importation wasn’t banned until 1807, many of those arrivals could have been legal.)


9) Modern-day forced migration: human trafficking

Dave Eames and Mark Morris/Kansas City Star

Large-scale human trafficking is no longer legal, let alone widely condoned. But it still happens. This graphic is one attempt to map the global reach of the contemporary human-smuggling industry.

A report by the Urban Institute in 2014 interviewed 122 victims of labor trafficking in the United States, and found that 71 percent of those trafficked actually had legal visas when they arrived in the country. But because immigrant workers’ legal status is tied to their employer, most victims who escaped their traffickers had lost their legal status by the time they were connected to law enforcement. Furthermore, the report found, public officials often encountered labor-trafficking victims and failed to realize what was going on — or, worse, sided with the traffickers and threatened to report the victims to federal immigration agents.


A nation of immigrants

10) The most famous immigrant in American history

Give me your tired, your poor;
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free;
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore;
Send these, the homeless, tempest-toss’d, to me;
I lift my lamp beside the golden door.
—Emma Lazarus, 1883

Of course, the Statue of Liberty was itself an immigrant. It was designed and cast in copper in France over the span of a decade, from 1876 to 1884, as an intended gift from the French government to the United States. But the statue then had to wait in France for several months until the Americans had done enough work on its pedestal. It was then shipped to the United States in 350 separate pieces, housed in 214 crates, to be assembled by American workers once it arrived.


11) An insanely detailed map of immigrants in America from 1903

Frank P. Sargent/Commission-General of Immigration (via Michigan State University)

This exhaustive map includes 51 infographics (for each state plus Washington, DC). The right column of the infographic covers how many immigrants settled in the state each year; the left column shows their occupations. The top depicts the ethnic mix, color-coded by race: Teutonic, Keltic, Slavic, Iberic, Mongolic, and “all others.”

At the time, those racial labels were real — and the source of anxiety. A medical journal article from this era expressed concern about the “preponderance of the Iberic and Slavic races” among recent immigrants, because of “their poorer physical and mental equipment” compared to “Celtic and Teutonic” immigrants.


12) How charities helped immigrants become American

The organization Hull House (founded by Jane Addams) was devoted to serving Chicago’s urban poor; in the process, it set the template for charity in America. And most of Chicago’s urban poor were immigrants: in 1890, in fact, immigrants made up 77 percent of the city’s population. To better tailor its services to the communities it served (and to assist the federal government in its study of urban “ghettos”), Hull House researchers produced maps like this one, which shows the ethnicity of each immigrant family living in a given tenement block.

The result was that Hull House increasingly focused on teaching English, civics, and other skills that would help immigrants and first-generation Americans assimilate — what would be called the “Americanization” movement. The existence of organizations like Hull House, which were willing to take the time to help immigrants acclimate to America and learn things (like English) that they needed to succeed, was an important factor in helping the European immigrants of 100 years ago assimilate to the point where they simply counted as “white” Americans.


13) Are today’s immigrants less Americanized?

Claude S. Fischer, Mike Hout, Aliya Saperstein

The “Americanization” movement of the early 1900s wasn’t just about how to help immigrants. It was also grounded in the belief that immigrants should be welcomed to the United States only if they wanted to, and could, be successfully assimilated into America. That idea survives today, in everything from the metaphor of the country as a “melting pot” to the demand that immigrants “learn English.” But while “learning English” is shorthand for assimilation, and despite fears that this generation of immigrants is less assimilated than their forerunners, immigrants to America in the late 20th century were much more likely to know English when they got here, or to pick it up quickly, than the immigrants who lived at Hull House. Even Latino immigrants, who lag behind other immigrants (who tend to be more educated) in how long it takes them to speak English, perform much better than the European immigrants of the 1880s.


14) The grandchildren of today’s Latino immigrants barely speak Spanish

Pew Hispanic Trends Project

Second-generation Latinos — the children of immigrants — tend to be fully bilingual; this might mean they’re used to speaking with their parents in Spanish but using English outside the home, or just that they’re in situations where they deal with Spanish and English speakers pretty much equally. And with the third generation, who are grandchildren of immigrants, bilingualism fades quickly. In fact, the proportion of immigrants who speak mostly English (35 percent) is bigger than the share of Latinos who are thoroughly bilingual in the third generation.


15) Immigrants are saving the Midwest

More Americans are leaving Middle America than moving there (with the exception of North Dakota). But immigrants are forestalling Middle America’s demographic decline. A Chicago Council study in 2014 found four metro areas (including Davenport, Iowa, on the Illinois border, and Duluth in eastern Minnesota) that grew between 2000 and 2010 solely because of the immigrant population, and another five where immigrants made up more than 50 percent of the metro area’s total growth over that time. But immigrants might be having an even bigger impact in rural areas in Middle America, where the demographic crunch is most acute. In Kansas, immigrants make up 5.3 percent of the rural population; in Nebraska it’s 4.8 percent. Just as importantly, immigrants are making these areas demographically younger. The Chicago Council report found that Wichita, Kansas, for example, lost 24 percent of its 35- to 44-year-old, native-born population from 2000 to 2010 — but its immigrant population in that age range grew by 87 percent.


A nation of (immigration) laws

16) 200 years of immigration in one gorgeous visual

Natalia Bronshtein

It’s easy now to assume that Mexico has always been among the main sources of immigration to America. But as this wonderful chart by Natalia Bronshtein (using 200 years of government data) shows, that’s not even close to true. There’s an interactive version on Bronshtein’s website: you can hover over any color, at any point, and see the exact number of immigrants who became residents from that country in that decade. But taken as a whole, the chart tells a very clear story: there are two laws that totally transformed immigration to the United States.


17) The 1920s law that made immigration much less diverse — and created illegal immigration as we know it

Because the quota laws were passed in the early 1920s, but were based on immigration flows from 1890, they actually rolled back immigration from certain countries. Politicians were worried that new immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe (largely Italians and Jews) were genetically “inferior” immigrant stock was threatening Americans’ quality of life. This pair of maps, from the New York Times, shows the effects of the primary quota law: the National Origins Act of 1924. The map to the left of the slider shows annual immigration to America from various European countries before the law was passed; the map to the right of the slider shows the quotas imposed for each country under the law. The National Origins Act forced the legal immigrant population to plummet — and made “illegal immigration” a widespread phenomenon for the first time in American history. It hasn’t stopped since.


18) How America began to rely on Mexican labor

With World War II causing labor shortages, the United States started to encourage seasonal labor from Mexico. As the map shows, the 2 million braceros who came under the program (from 1942 to 1964) migrated from all over Mexico to most of the United States. Most worked in agriculture, under punishing conditions: according to some reports, braceros were sprayed directly with DDT (an insecticide now known to be carcinogenic and toxic to humans). The bracero program was supposed to prevent migrants from settling in the United States by sending 10 percent of their paychecks back to Mexico. But many braceros returned to Mexico only to discover their money had not. Many Mexican Americans are descended from braceros, and the memory of their mistreatment colors their opinions of guest-worker proposals today.


19) America’s only been a global destination for the past 50 years

The modern era of immigration to America began in 1965, when the restrictionist quotas of the National Origins Act were replaced by the Immigration and Nationality Act. It’s only in this era that immigration to the United States has really become a global phenomenon — with European and Mexican immigrants joined by Asian, Central and South American, and African immigrants. There are still more immigrants from some countries than from others — in 2013, there were twice as many naturalized US citizens from Mexico as from any other country — but as this chart shows, immigration to the United States has never been more globally balanced.


20) How to come here the right way

Mike Flynn, Shikha Dalmia, Terry Colon/Reason Magazine

From one perspective, there are plenty of ways to come to the United States legally — there’s an alphabet soup of visas, not to mention immigrant Americans’ ability to sponsor family members for green cards. But the overwhelming majority of the world’s non-American population isn’t eligible for any of these paths. In other words, there’s no legal immigration “line” for them to get into. Furthermore, there are far too many qualified applicants for most available visas — causing years-long (or even decades-long) backlogs for Mexican, Chinese, Indian and Filipino immigrants hoping to bring their parents, adult children, or siblings to the United States. This flowchart, from Reason Magazine, shows who’s able to come “the right way” and who isn’t. Spoiler alert: most aren’t, and most of those who are will have to wait a long time.


21) The era of unauthorized immigration: 1996–2006

Joe Posner/Vox

This chart documents the biggest wave of unauthorized migration in US history: from 1996, when the economy was booming and a law made it harder for unauthorized immigrants to “get legal,” to the US recession of the late 2000s. The line graph (and the left y-axis) shows how many immigrants entered the country illegally each year; the bar chart (and the right y-axis) shows the estimated number of unauthorized immigrants living in the United States at that time.


Nativism, then and now

22) One reason some Americans fear immigrants? They overestimate how many there are

Americans have an unfortunate tendency to overestimate how many people in the United States are immigrants — possibly because many white Americans assume that most Latinos in the United States are immigrants (and some assume most Latinos in the United States are unauthorized immigrants). Fears of America being overrun by immigrants make a little more sense if you think that a third of people living in the United States are immigrants already.


23) America’s first single-issue party was anti-immigrant

National Atlas of the United States

The American Party of the 1840s and 1850s was often called, and is remembered today as, the “Know-Nothing Party.” In the 1856 presidential election, as shown here, Maryland sent its electoral votes to the party (which had nominated former President Millard Fillmore). The leading Know-Nothing in Congress, Lewis Charles Levin of Pennsylvania, was also the first Jewish member of the US Congress. American nativists have usually been more afraid of some kinds of immigrants than others — and one way for an immigrant to assimilate into American life is to play the “good immigrant,” attacking the bad ones.


24) When Louisville rioted against Catholic immigrants

The Public I

In 1855, the Know-Nothing Party was beginning to take over politics in Louisville, Kentucky. The night before a local election in August, Know-Nothings armed with torches paraded through the city’s Catholic areas, telling voters to “keep their elbows in.” That day — fueled by rumors that hundreds of armed Germans were taking over polling places, and that an Irishman had killed a Know-Nothing — the Know-Nothings exploded into wholesale rioting in the Irish and German sections of town. At least 22 people were killed — and probably many more. From the blog the Public I: “The death toll would have been higher but in the German district one of the first buildings looted was Armbruster’s brewery. The rioters got so drunk they could only satisfy themselves with torching the building before passing out.”


25) An 1885 “vice map” of San Francisco’s Chinatown

W. B. Farwell, John E. Kunkler, E. B. Pond/San Francisco Board of Supervisors

The first immigration restrictions in US history were passed in 1882, when the Chinese Exclusion Act more or less eliminated legal immigration from China. This created a market in human smuggling and trafficking — especially of young Chinese women. The US Customs and Border Protection website is still proud of the agency’s work in “kidnapping” Chinese women “in order to save them” from brothel owners and human traffickers. But as this “vice map of Chinatown,” created by the City of San Francisco, shows, attempts to “save” immigrant victims from their traffickers often bled into prejudice against the immorality of the immigrant community itself.


26) Fears of an immigrant “fifth column” bought into Nazi propaganda

One of the recurring themes in American nativism is the fear that immigrants will be more loyal to their native countries than to their adopted ones — including in times of war. This map, from a book of Nazi propaganda, tried to exploit those fears. It sent the message that every one of the 20 million German Americans in the United States could be counted on to stand with their homeland rather than with the country that their families had lived in for (in some cases) generations. But the fear was groundless. The United States never had a substantial Nazi-sympathizer movement — and the closest thing to it were the “isolationists,” who were interested in staying out of World War II not because they were loyal to Germany, but because they didn’t feel any connection to Europe.


27) Japanese internment camps

All Aboard Magazine

During World War II, fears of an immigrant fifth column led President Franklin D. Roosevelt to order 120,000 Japanese Americans into internment camps in the western United States. The majority of internees were American citizens, and many were born in the United States. Internment ended in 1944, before Japan surrendered to the United States. But many internees had lost their homes and belongings. Several thousand German Americans and Italian Americans, among others, were also put into camps during World War II. But the scope of the Japanese internment is striking — especially because no Japanese American was ever found guilty of espionage.


28) Langston Hughes’s doodles turn a pro-immigrant map into an anti-Jim Crow one

Emma Bourne/Council Against Intolerance In America

While other Americans worried that immigrants were a threat to a country at war, the Council Against Intolerance made this illustrated map to argue the opposite: that prejudice itself would weaken the United States against its enemies. It’s a relatively early example of an idea that’s become popular in recent decades: that diversity itself is what makes America strong, and that difference is something to be celebrated rather than eliminated. This particular copy of the council’s map was owned by Langston Hughes, who penciled in a couple of illustrations of his own — including a burning Ku Klux Klan cross near Louisiana — making the point that the people most interested in preserving differences between groups tend to be the ones least interested in tolerance.


A bordered country

29) This is what the border actually is

Popularly, “the border” is a line between United States and Mexico. But officially, it’s a 100-mile area that stretches all the way around the United States — covering as much as two-thirds of the nation’s population. The legal definition of the border matters because the government has long said it can do things “at the border” to track down unauthorized migration and smuggling that it can’t do other places, from setting up “checkpoints” within the United States to check drivers’ citizenship to straight-up racial profiling. As recently as 2011, Border Patrol officers were boarding buses in upstate New York to ask passengers for IDs, and responding to police calls in Forks, Washington. New guidance from the federal government, which came out in December 2014, has opened the door to narrowing the definition of the “border” — but it’s not clear whether it will.


30) The militarization of the US/Mexico border

border militarization mapJoss Fong/Vox

Increasing border security is a very recent phenomenon: the number of Border Patrol agents on the United States/Mexico border has more than quadrupled from 1995 to 2014. The militarization of the border hasn’t been evenly spaced: it’s concentrated on the areas that people are most likely to cross. The buildup was supposed to stop unauthorized entrances, but it also made it harder for unauthorized immigrants to leave the United States if they ever wanted to return. Immigrants who were used to splitting time between their jobs in the United States and their families at home moved their families to the United States instead — and the unauthorized population grew, and settled.


31) A volunteer effort to identify immigrants who died crossing the border

Источник: https://www.vox.com/2015/1/12/7474897/immigration-america-maps
1847 Ornamental Map of the United States and Mexico

By: Humphrey Phelps
Date: 1847 (dated) New York
Original Size: 28.5 x 21 inches
This is a fine reproduction of one of the most sought after, decorative map of the United States and Mexico, published during the Mexican War.

This exciting work by Humphrey Phelps features the new, enlarged state of Texas. The "Great Oregon Rail Road" is delineated across the country, along crudely drawn state and territorial boundaries from New York to Oregon City. Territories depicted west of the Mississippi include the Missouri Territory, Indian Territory, the Oregon Territory and Upper California, which is shown under control of the United States before the was came to an end. Texas is shows as the largest it has ever been.
Adorning the map are portraits of Cortez, Washington, and Montezuma. Below the map are, portraits of generals Taylor and Santa Anna, the official seals of Mexico and America, as well as a view of an Aztec temple.The text describes the history of the region culminating with the Mexican American War and showing the United States in possession of New Mexico and the Californias despite the fact that the war had not yet ended at the time of publication.
Inventory #80006

Special Request & Contact Form

Open tab
What can be referred to as modern cartography has been around for over 550 years. Throughout that time an enormous amount of new land was discovered, cities were founded while others perished. International trade and travel became the norm, political borders were ever-changing, and numerous wars were waged. With all that being said, hundreds of thousands of maps were created that show such events and episodes in time. 
If we do not have exactly what you are looking for, let us know. Even if you are not exactly sure what you are looking for, we can help. All you have to do is ask...
Источник: https://thevintagemapshop.com/products/1847-ornamental-map-of-the-united-states-and-texas

Mexico Map and Satellite Image

ADVERTISEMENT


Mexico Bordering Countries:

Belize, Guatemala, United States of America

Regional Maps:

  Map of North America,   World Map

Where is Mexico?


Map of Mexico States


Map of Mexico States

Mexico Satellite Image


Mexico satellite photo
Political Map of Mexico and Central America

Political Map of Mexico and Central America:

This is a political map of Mexico and Central America which shows the countries of the region along with capital cities, major cities, islands, oceans, seas, and gulfs. The map is a portion of a larger world map created by the Central Intelligence Agency using Robinson Projection. You can also view the full pan-and-zoom CIA World Mapas a PDF document.
Explore Mexico Using Google Earth

Explore Mexico Using Google Earth:

Google Earth is a free program from Google that allows you to explore satellite images showing the cities and landscapes of Mexico and all of North America in fantastic detail. It works on your desktop computer, tablet, or mobile phone. The images in many areas are detailed enough that you can see houses, vehicles and even people on a city street. Google Earth is free and easy-to-use.
Mexico on a World Wall Map

Mexico on a World Wall Map:

Mexico is one of nearly 200 countries illustrated on our Blue Ocean Laminated Map of the World. This map shows a combination of political and physical features. It includes country boundaries, major cities, major mountains in shaded relief, ocean depth in blue color gradient, along with many other features. This is a great map for students, schools, offices and anywhere that a nice map of the world is needed for education, display or decor.
Mexico On a Large Wall Map of North America

Mexico On a Large Wall Map of North America:

If you are interested in Mexico and the geography of North America, our large laminated map of North America might be just what you need. It is a large political map of North America that also shows many of the continent's physical features in color or shaded relief. Major lakes, rivers, cities, roads, country boundaries, coastlines and surrounding islands are all shown on the map.

Mexico Cities:

Acapulco, Aguascalientes, Cabo San Lucas, Campeche, Cancun, Casas Grandes, Chetumal, Chihuahua, Chilpancingo, Ciudad Acuna, Ciudad del Carmen, Ciudad Juarez, Ciudad Obregon, Ciudad Victoria, Coatzacoalcos, Colima, Cuauhtemoc, Cuernavaca, Culiacan, Delicias, Durango, Ensenada, Guadalajara, Guanajuato, Guaymas, Guerrero Negro, Hermosillo, Hidalgo del Parral, Iguala, Jalapa, Jimenez, La Paz, Lazaro Cardenas, Leon, Loreto, Los Mochis, Manzanillo, Matamoros, Mexicali, Mazatlan, Merida, Mexico City, Monclova, Monterrey, Morelia, Morro Redondo, Nogales, Nuevo Laredo, Oaxaca, Pachuca, Poza Rica, Puebla, Puerto Escondido, Puerto Penasco, Puerto Vallarta, Queretaro, Salina Cruz, Saltillo, San Felipe, San Luis Potosi, San Quintin, Santa Rosalia, Tampico, Tepic, Tlaxcala, Tijuana, Toluca, Torreon, Tuxtla Gutierrez, Veracruz, Villahermosa, and Zacatecas.

Mexico States:

Aguascalientes, Baja California, Baja California Sur, Campeche, Chiapas, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Colima, Durango, Guanajuato, Guerrero, Hidalgo, Jalisco, Mexico, Michoacan, Morelos, Nayarit, Nuevo Leon, Oaxaca, Puebla, Queretaro, Quintana Roo, San Luis Potosi, Sinaloa, Sonora, Tabasco, Tamaulipas, Tlaxcala, Veracruz, Yucatan, and Zacatecas. Distrito Federal (the area including and surrounding Mexico City) is a federal district.

Mexico Locations:

Bahia Blanco, Bahia de San Jorge, Bahia la Ventana, Bahia Santa Maria, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of California, Gulf of Mexico, Lago Catemaco, Lago de Chapala, Laguna Agua Brava, Laguna de Pueblo Viejo, Laguna de San Andres, Laguna de Tamiahua, Laguna Inferior, Laguna Madre, Pacific Ocean, Presa Alvaro Obregon, Presa de la Angostura, Presa de la Boquilla, Presa Miguel Aleman, Presa Nezahualcoyotl, Rio Balsas, Rio Conchos, Rio Grande and Rio Verde.

Mexico Natural Resources:

Mexico has fossil fuel deposits which include petroleum and natural gas. Some of the country's metal resources are copper, gold, lead, silver, and zinc. Timber is also a natural resource for Mexico.

Mexico Natural Hazards:

The country of Mexico has volcanic activity and destructive earthquakes which occur in the central and southern parts of the country. Other natural hazards include tsunamis along the Pacific coast, and hurricanes on the Pacific, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean coasts.

Mexico Environmental Issues:

Environmental issues for Mexico are numerous. Regarding the land, the issues include: deforestation; widespread erosion; the deterioration of agricultural lands; desertification. In addition, the land in the Valley of Mexico is sinking due to the depletion of groundwater. The country has rural to urban migration. This complicates the serious air and water pollution in the nation's capital and urban centers along the United States-Mexico border. Raw sewage and industrial effluents are polluting the rivers in urban areas. In addition, the natural freshwater resources are scarce and polluted in the north. These resources are also of poor quality or inaccessible in the center and extreme southeast of Mexico. The country has a scarcity of hazardous waste disposal facilities. Note: The government considers the lack of clean water and deforestation national security issues.
Copyright information: The images on this page were composed by Angela King and Brad Cole and are copyright by Geology.com. These images are not available for use beyond our websites. If you would like to share them with others please link to this page. The satellite image was produced using Landsat data from NASA.
Источник: https://geology.com/world/mexico-satellite-image.shtml

Map of Mexico

Mexico has it all: vast cactus-strewn deserts, jungles dotted with ancient ruined pyramids, grand colonial cities and gorgeous Pacific and Caribbean coastlines. The richly varied culinary scene reflects a beguiling blend of Spanish and indigenous traditions, while vibrant markets supply perhaps the brightest and boldest crafts in the world. Use our map of Mexico to plan your journey to find the tastiest tacos, the most inspirational Rivera murals, the coolest tequila bars and the most challenging treks.

Mexico is rich in history; explore the tribal Oaxacan highlands; admire the Bonampak murals; or take in the cave art of Baja California, before heading to its beaches to spot whales. Whether you choose to explore the Zócalo in Mexico City or party on the long beaches of Caribbean coastline on the Riviera Maya, you’ll find plenty to see and do in Mexico.

If you are planning to travel, check out Mexico itineraries, read more on the best places to go in Mexico, learn about getting there and where to stay once you are there.

The Rough Guide to Mexico and related travel guides

In-depth, easy-to-use travel guides filled with expert advice.

Travel advice for Mexico

Find even more inspiration for Mexico here

previous photo
previous photo
Источник: https://www.roughguides.com/maps/north-america/mexico/

Mexico Map and Satellite Image

ADVERTISEMENT


Mexico Bordering Countries:

Belize, Guatemala, United States of America

Regional Maps:

  Map of North America,   World Map

Where is Mexico?


Map of Mexico States


Map of Mexico States

Mexico Satellite Image


Mexico satellite photo
Political Map of Mexico and Central America

Political Map of Mexico and Central America:

This is a political map of Mexico and Central America which shows the countries of the region along with capital cities, major cities, islands, oceans, seas, and gulfs. The map is a portion of a larger world map created by the Central Intelligence Agency using Robinson Projection. You can also view the full pan-and-zoom CIA World Mapas a PDF document.
Explore Mexico Using Google Earth

Explore Mexico Using Google Earth:

Google Earth is a free program from Google that allows you to explore satellite images showing the cities and landscapes of Mexico and all of North America in fantastic detail. It works on your desktop computer, tablet, or mobile phone. The images in many areas are detailed enough that you can see houses, vehicles and even people on a city street. Google Earth is free and easy-to-use.
Mexico on a World Wall Map

Mexico on a World Wall Map:

Mexico is one of nearly 200 countries illustrated on our Blue Ocean Laminated Map of the World. This map shows a combination of political and physical features. It includes country boundaries, major cities, major mountains in shaded relief, ocean depth in blue color gradient, along with many other features. This is a great map for students, schools, offices and anywhere that a nice map of the world is needed for education, display or decor.
Mexico On a Large Wall Map of North America

Mexico On a Large Wall Map of North America:

If you are interested in Mexico and the geography of North America, our large laminated map of North America might be just what you need. It is a large political map of North America that also shows many of the continent's physical features in color or shaded relief. Major lakes, rivers, cities, roads, country boundaries, coastlines and surrounding islands are all shown on the map.

Mexico Cities:

Acapulco, Aguascalientes, Cabo San Lucas, Campeche, Cancun, Casas Grandes, Chetumal, Chihuahua, Chilpancingo, Ciudad Acuna, Ciudad del Carmen, Ciudad Juarez, Ciudad Obregon, Ciudad Victoria, Coatzacoalcos, Colima, Cuauhtemoc, Cuernavaca, Culiacan, Delicias, Durango, Ensenada, Guadalajara, Guanajuato, Guaymas, Guerrero Negro, Hermosillo, Hidalgo del Parral, Iguala, Jalapa, Jimenez, La Paz, Lazaro Cardenas, Leon, Loreto, Los Mochis, Manzanillo, Matamoros, Mexicali, Mazatlan, Merida, Mexico City, Monclova, Monterrey, Morelia, Morro Redondo, Nogales, Nuevo Laredo, Oaxaca, Pachuca, Poza Rica, Puebla, Puerto Escondido, Puerto Penasco, Puerto Vallarta, Queretaro, Salina Cruz, Saltillo, San Felipe, San Luis Potosi, San Quintin, Santa Rosalia, Tampico, Tepic, Tlaxcala, Tijuana, Toluca, Torreon, Tuxtla Gutierrez, Veracruz, Villahermosa, and Zacatecas.

Mexico States:

Aguascalientes, Baja California, Baja California Sur, Campeche, Chiapas, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Colima, Durango, Guanajuato, Guerrero, Hidalgo, Jalisco, Mexico, Michoacan, Morelos, Nayarit, Nuevo Leon, Oaxaca, Puebla, Queretaro, Quintana Roo, San Luis Potosi, Sinaloa, Sonora, Tabasco, Tamaulipas, Tlaxcala, Veracruz, Yucatan, and Zacatecas. Distrito Federal (the area including and surrounding Mexico City) is a federal district.

Mexico Locations:

Bahia Blanco, Bahia de San Jorge, Bahia la Ventana, Bahia Santa Maria, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of California, Gulf of Mexico, Lago Catemaco, Lago de Chapala, Laguna Agua Brava, Laguna de Pueblo Viejo, Laguna de San Andres, Laguna de Tamiahua, Laguna Inferior, Laguna Madre, Pacific Ocean, Presa Alvaro Obregon, Presa de la Angostura, Presa de la Boquilla, Presa Miguel Aleman, Presa Nezahualcoyotl, Rio Balsas, Rio Foreclosed homes for sale tulsa, Rio Grande and Rio Verde.

Mexico Natural Resources:

Mexico has fossil fuel deposits which include petroleum and natural gas. Some of the country's metal resources are copper, gold, lead, silver, and zinc. Timber is also a natural resource for Mexico.

Mexico Natural Hazards:

The country of Mexico has volcanic activity and destructive earthquakes which occur in the central and southern parts of the country. Other natural hazards include tsunamis along the Pacific coast, and hurricanes on the Pacific, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean coasts.

Mexico Environmental Issues:

Environmental issues for Mexico are numerous. Regarding the land, the issues include: deforestation; widespread erosion; the deterioration of agricultural lands; desertification. In addition, the land in the Valley of Mexico is sinking due to the depletion of groundwater. The country has rural to urban migration. This complicates the serious air and water pollution in the nation's capital and urban centers along the United States-Mexico border. Raw sewage and industrial effluents are polluting the rivers in urban areas. In addition, the natural freshwater resources are scarce and polluted in the north. These resources are also of poor quality or inaccessible in the center and extreme southeast of Mexico. The country has a scarcity of hazardous waste disposal facilities. Note: The government considers the lack of clean water and deforestation national security issues.
Copyright information: The images on this page were composed by Angela King and Brad Cole and are copyright by Geology.com. These images are not available for use beyond our websites. If you would like to share them with others please link to this page. The satellite image was produced using Landsat data from NASA.
Источник: https://geology.com/world/mexico-satellite-image.shtml

37 maps that explain how America is a nation of immigrants

American politicians, and Americans themselves, love to call themselves “a nation of immigrants”: a place where everyone’s family has, at some point, chosen to come to seek freedom or a better life. America has managed to maintain that self-image through the forced migration of millions of African slaves, restrictive immigration laws based on fears of “inferior” races, and nativist movements that encouraged immigrants to assimilate or simply leave.

But while the reality of America’s immigrant heritage is more complicated than the myth, it’s still a fundamental truth of the country’s history. It’s impossible to understand the country today without knowing who’s been kept out, who’s been let in, and how they’ve been treated once they arrive.


Where we come from

1) We’re all immigrants

US Census Bureau

This map from the 2000 census colors each county according to which country most of its residents cite as their “ancestry.” What might be most surprising about this map is the predominance of light yellow in Appalachia; in those counties, more people say their ancestry is simply “American” than anything else. But this is a strikingly recent phenomenon: the number of people saying their ancestry was “American” nearly doubled from 1990 to 2000. It’s amazing that in a country that’s been around for more than 200 years — with many family lineages having lived in the New World for even longer — most people are still able to identify their ancestry based on the countries in which their families lived before they immigrated to the United States.


2) The very first American migration

Even the first Americans were immigrants — it’s generally accepted that they came across “Beringia” (the land that’s now the Bering Strait, the body of water between Russia and Alaska) at least 20,000 years ago (and possibly as long as 30,000 years ago). But scientists are still trying to piece together when the first Americans came through Beringia; how many of them there were; and whether they came all at once, or in multiple waves.

This map, from a 2007 paper, is based on an analysis of mitochondrial DNA — which children inherit only from their mother, making it easier to trace one line back for many generations. The researchers hypothesize that the group that came to Beringia from Asia, approximately 25,000 years ago, actually stayed in Beringia for some time before some of them came through to the Americas. Then, however — according to this analysis — they populated the Americas fairly quickly, spreading as far south as Chile by 15,000 years ago. The analysis also suggests that some early Americans migrated back to Asia from Beringia, while other, newer waves of immigrants crossed to America.


3) America has more immigrants than anybody

Worldmapper.org

Later waves of European immigration killed off most of the first Americans (largely through European diseases, which traveled through the Americas much more quickly than European humans did). That set the stage for European Americans to rebrand the United States, in particular (where indigenous populations were almost completely “replaced”), as a “nation of immigrants.” Even today, America is still home to more total immigrants than any other country in the world. In this map, each country’s size is distorted to reflect the size of its immigrant population. It’s based on 2005 data, but a 2013 UN report shows that 19.8 percent of the world’s international migrants live in the United States.


4) .but as a share of the population, the US doesn’t crack the top 10

As much as American politicians pat themselves on the back for representing “the most welcoming country in the world,” there are smaller countries that have been more open to immigrants in recent decades. So on this chart from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), which measures the percentage of each country’s population that was made up of immigrants in 2000 (the orange dot) and 2010 (the blue bar), America doesn’t even hit the top 10. Some of the countries that outrank the United States are tiny — it’s much easier for 40 percent of Luxembourg’s population to be immigrants, since the country has only 540,000 people, than it would be for the United States — but medium-size countries like Canada, Australia, and Spain also outrank the United States.


5) The simplest explanation of how immigration to America has changed

mexico germany immigration GIFPew Research Center

If this feature were called “A nation of immigrants in one map,” this is the one we’d show you. The bottom line: before 1965, Germany sent more immigrants to America than anyone else; after 1965, Mexico did.

Here’s why: from World War I to 1965, the immigration system was designed, essentially, to keep the United States white. Rice University sociologist Stephen Klineberg has called it “unbelievable in its clarity of racism.” Each country was given a certain quota of immigrants who were allowed to come to the United States each year, based on who’d been in the country in 1890.

Combined with existing laws that prevented any Asian Americans from coming into the country, the laws of the 1920s basically froze the demographics of the immigrant population in place until 1965.


6) The Danish Utahns, and other immigrant enclaves

where immigrants live@MetricMaps

This GIF, compiled by internet hero @MetricMaps, tracks where immigrants from different countries have settled in the United States. The result is an exhaustive portrait of more than two dozen different native countries and regions. Some ancestry groups pop up in interesting places, revealing forgotten pockets of American history — the Danish population in Utah, for example, is the result of an extremely early wave of Danish conversion to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons).


Forced migration, then and now

7) Forced migration built America

David Eltis and David Richardson/Atlas of the Transatlantic Slave Trade, reprinted with permission of Yale University Press

The American myth about “a nation of immigrants” excludes millions of forced migrants to America from Africa, who were brought to the US over two centuries of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. It’s hard to overstate how much slaves built America: according to historian Steven Deyle, the value of all slaves in 1860 was seven times the value of all currency then in circulation in the United States. Slave labor built the agrarian economy of the South and fed the cotton mills of the industrializing North. But slaves had no way to become citizens, build wealth, or bring their families — they had no opportunity to practice the self-reliance that America often expects of its immigrants.


8) The first illegal migrations were of trafficked slaves

The forced migration of Africans to America also represents the first unauthorized migration to the United States. The Constitution banned the “importation” (trafficking) of slaves into the United States after 1809, but black-market slave trading continued until the Civil War. According to historian David Eltis of Emory University, 1.5 million Africans arrived in the Americas after the countries they landed in had theoretically banned the slave trade. Because there were no restrictions on voluntary migration to the United States until the 1880s, these were the first people to come to the country illegally.

The Atlas of the Transatlantic Slave Trade documents 78,360 slaves landing in mainland North America from 1800 to 1865 — about 20 percent of all arrivals over the 200 years of the slave trade. (Since slave importation wasn’t banned until 1807, many of those arrivals could have been legal.)


9) Modern-day forced migration: human trafficking

Dave Eames and Mark Morris/Kansas City Star

Large-scale human trafficking is no longer legal, let alone widely condoned. But it still happens. This graphic is one attempt to map the global reach of whole foods houston contemporary human-smuggling industry.

A report by the Urban Institute in 2014 interviewed 122 victims of labor trafficking in the United States, and found that 71 percent of those trafficked actually had legal visas when they arrived in the country. But because immigrant workers’ legal status is tied to their employer, most victims who escaped their traffickers had lost their legal status by the time they were connected to law enforcement. Furthermore, the report found, public officials often encountered labor-trafficking victims and failed to realize what was going on — or, worse, sided with the traffickers and map of america and mexico to report the victims to federal immigration agents.


A nation of immigrants

10) The most famous immigrant in American history

Give me your tired, your poor;
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free;
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore;
Send these, the homeless, tempest-toss’d, to me;
I lift my lamp beside the golden door.
—Emma Lazarus, 1883

Of course, the Statue of Liberty was itself an immigrant. It was designed and cast in copper in France over the span of a decade, from 1876 to 1884, as an intended gift from the French government to the United States. But the statue then had to wait in France for several months until the Americans had done enough work on its pedestal. It was then shipped to the United States in 350 separate pieces, housed in 214 crates, to be assembled by American workers once it arrived.


11) An insanely detailed map of immigrants in America from 1903

Frank P. Sargent/Commission-General of Immigration (via Michigan State University)

This exhaustive map includes 51 infographics (for each state plus Washington, DC). The right column of the infographic covers how many immigrants settled in the state each year; the left column shows their occupations. The top depicts the ethnic mix, color-coded by race: Teutonic, Keltic, Slavic, Iberic, Mongolic, and “all others.”

At the time, those racial labels were real — and the source of anxiety. A medical journal article from this era expressed concern about the “preponderance of the Iberic and Slavic races” among recent immigrants, because of “their poorer physical and mental equipment” compared to “Celtic and Teutonic” immigrants.


12) How charities helped immigrants become American

The organization Hull House (founded by Jane Addams) was devoted to serving Chicago’s urban poor; in the process, it set the template for charity in America. And most of Chicago’s urban poor were immigrants: in 1890, in fact, immigrants made up 77 percent of the city’s population. To better tailor its services to the communities it served (and to assist the federal government in its study of urban “ghettos”), Hull House researchers produced maps like this one, which shows the ethnicity of each immigrant family living in a given tenement block.

The result was that Hull House increasingly focused on teaching English, civics, and other skills that would help immigrants and first-generation Americans assimilate — what would be called the “Americanization” movement. The existence of organizations like Hull House, which were willing to take the time to help immigrants acclimate to America and learn things (like English) that they needed to succeed, was an important factor in helping the European immigrants of 100 years ago assimilate to the point where they simply santander bank hours near me as “white” Americans.


13) Are today’s immigrants less Americanized?

Claude S. Fischer, Mike Hout, Aliya Saperstein

The “Americanization” movement of the early 1900s wasn’t just about how to help immigrants. It was also grounded in the belief that immigrants should be welcomed to the United States only if they wanted to, and could, be successfully assimilated into America. That idea survives today, in everything from the metaphor of the country as a “melting pot” to the demand that immigrants “learn English.” But while “learning English” is shorthand for assimilation, and despite fears that this generation of immigrants is less assimilated than their forerunners, immigrants to America in the late 20th century were much more likely to know English when they got here, or to pick it up quickly, than the immigrants who lived at Hull House. Even Latino immigrants, who lag behind other immigrants (who tend to be more educated) in how long it takes them to speak English, perform much better than the European immigrants of the 1880s.


14) The grandchildren of today’s Latino immigrants barely speak Spanish

Pew Hispanic Trends Project

Second-generation Latinos — the children of immigrants — tend to be fully bilingual; this might mean they’re used to speaking with their parents in Spanish but using English outside the home, or just that they’re in situations where they deal with Spanish and English speakers pretty much equally. And with the third generation, who are grandchildren online login citibank credit card immigrants, bilingualism fades quickly. In fact, the proportion of immigrants who speak mostly English (35 percent) is bigger than the share of Latinos who are thoroughly bilingual in the third generation.


15) Map of america and mexico are saving the Midwest

More Americans are leaving Middle America than moving there (with the exception of North Dakota). But immigrants are forestalling Middle America’s demographic decline. A Chicago Council study in 2014 found four metro areas (including Davenport, Iowa, on the Illinois border, and Duluth in eastern Minnesota) that grew between 2000 and 2010 solely because of the immigrant population, and another five where immigrants made up more than 50 percent of the metro area’s total growth over that time. But immigrants might be having an even bigger impact in rural areas in Middle America, where the demographic crunch is most acute. In Kansas, immigrants make up 5.3 percent of the rural population; in Nebraska it’s 4.8 percent. Just as importantly, immigrants are making these areas demographically younger. The Chicago Council report found that Wichita, Kansas, for example, lost 24 percent of its 35- to 44-year-old, native-born population from 2000 to 2010 — but its immigrant population in that age range grew by 87 percent.


A nation of (immigration) laws

16) 200 years of immigration in one gorgeous visual

Natalia Bronshtein

It’s easy now to assume that Mexico has always been among the main sources of immigration to America. But as this wonderful chart by Natalia Bronshtein (using 200 years of government data) shows, that’s not even close to true. There’s an interactive version on Bronshtein’s website: you can hover over any color, at any point, and see the exact number of immigrants who became residents from that country in that decade. But taken as a whole, the chart tells a very clear story: there are two laws that totally transformed immigration to the United States.


17) The 1920s law that made immigration much less diverse — and created illegal immigration as we know it

Because the quota laws were passed in the early 1920s, but were based on immigration flows from 1890, they actually rolled back immigration from certain countries. Politicians were worried that new immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe (largely Italians and Jews) were genetically “inferior” immigrant stock was threatening Americans’ quality of life. This pair of maps, from the New York Times, shows the effects of the primary quota law: the National Origins Act of 1924. The map to the left of the slider shows annual immigration to America from various European countries before the law was passed; the map to the right of the slider shows the quotas imposed for each country under the law. The National Origins Act forced the legal immigrant population to plummet — and made “illegal immigration” a widespread phenomenon for the first time in American history. It hasn’t stopped since.


18) How America began to rely on Mexican labor

With World War II causing labor shortages, the United States started to encourage seasonal labor from Mexico. As the map shows, the 2 million braceros who came under the program (from 1942 to 1964) migrated from all over Mexico to most of the United States. Most worked in agriculture, under punishing conditions: according to some reports, braceros were sprayed directly with DDT (an insecticide now known to be carcinogenic and toxic to humans). The bracero program was supposed to prevent migrants from settling in the United States by sending 10 percent of their paychecks back to Mexico. But many braceros returned to Mexico only to discover their money had not. Many Mexican Americans are descended from braceros, and the memory of their mistreatment colors their opinions of guest-worker proposals today.


19) America’s only been a global destination for the past 50 years

The modern era of immigration to America began in 1965, when the restrictionist quotas of the National Origins Act were replaced by the Immigration and Nationality Act. It’s only in this era that immigration to the United States has really become a global phenomenon — with European and Mexican immigrants joined by Asian, Central and South American, and African immigrants. There are still more immigrants from some countries than from others — in 2013, there were twice as many naturalized US citizens from Mexico as from any other country — but as this chart shows, immigration to the United States has never been more globally balanced.


20) How to come here the right way

Mike Flynn, Shikha Dalmia, Terry Colon/Reason Magazine

From one perspective, there are plenty of ways to come to the United States legally — there’s an alphabet soup of visas, not to mention immigrant Americans’ ability to sponsor family members for green cards. But crystal coast north carolina beach rentals overwhelming majority of the world’s non-American population isn’t eligible for any of these paths. In other words, there’s no legal immigration “line” for them to get into. Furthermore, there are far too many qualified applicants for most available visas — causing years-long (or even decades-long) backlogs for Mexican, Chinese, Indian and Filipino immigrants hoping to bring their parents, adult children, or siblings to the United States. This flowchart, from Reason Magazine, shows who’s able to come “the right way” and who isn’t. Spoiler alert: most aren’t, and most of those who are will have to wait a long time.


21) The era of unauthorized immigration: 1996–2006

Joe Posner/Vox

This chart documents the biggest wave of unauthorized migration in US history: from 1996, when the economy was booming and a law made it harder for unauthorized immigrants to “get legal,” to the US recession of the late 2000s. The line graph (and the left y-axis) shows how many immigrants entered the country illegally each year; the bar chart (and the right y-axis) shows the estimated number of unauthorized immigrants living in the United States at that time.


Nativism, then and now

22) One reason some Americans fear immigrants? They overestimate how many there are

Americans have an unfortunate tendency to overestimate how many people in the United States are immigrants — possibly because many white Americans assume that most Latinos in the United States are immigrants (and some assume most Latinos in the United States are unauthorized immigrants). Fears of America being overrun by immigrants make a little more sense if you think that a third of people living in the United States are immigrants already.


23) America’s first single-issue party was anti-immigrant

National Atlas of the United States

The American Party of the 1840s and 1850s was often called, and is remembered today as, the “Know-Nothing Party.” In the 1856 presidential election, as shown here, Maryland sent its electoral votes to the party (which had nominated former President Millard Fillmore). The leading Know-Nothing in Congress, Lewis Charles Levin of Pennsylvania, was also the first Jewish member of the US Congress. American nativists have usually been more afraid of some kinds of immigrants than others — and one way for an immigrant to assimilate into American life is to play the “good immigrant,” attacking the bad ones.


24) When Louisville rioted against Catholic immigrants

The Public I

In 1855, the Know-Nothing Party was beginning to take over politics in Louisville, Kentucky. First tennessee digital banking login night before a local election in August, Know-Nothings armed with torches paraded through the city’s Catholic areas, telling voters to “keep their elbows in.” That day — fueled by rumors that hundreds of armed Germans were taking over polling places, and that an Irishman had killed a Know-Nothing — the Know-Nothings exploded into wholesale rioting in the Irish and German sections of town. At least 22 people were killed — and probably many more. From the blog the Public I: “The death toll would have been higher but in the German district one of the first buildings looted was Armbruster’s brewery. The rioters got so drunk they could only satisfy themselves with torching the building before passing out.”


25) An 1885 “vice map” of San Francisco’s Chinatown

W. B. Farwell, John E. Kunkler, E. B. Pond/San Francisco Board of Supervisors

The first immigration restrictions in US history were passed in 1882, when the Chinese Exclusion Act more or less eliminated legal immigration from China. This created a market in human smuggling and trafficking — especially of young Chinese women. The US Customs and Border Protection website is still proud of the agency’s work in “kidnapping” Chinese women “in order to save them” from brothel owners and human traffickers. But as this “vice map of Chinatown,” created by the City of San Francisco, shows, attempts to “save” immigrant victims from their traffickers often bled into prejudice against the immorality of the immigrant community itself.


26) Fears of an immigrant “fifth column” bought into Nazi propaganda

One of the recurring themes in American nativism is the fear that immigrants will be more loyal to their native countries than to their adopted ones — including in times of war. This map, from a book of Nazi propaganda, tried to exploit those fears. It sent the message that every one of the 20 million German Americans in the United States could be counted on to stand with their homeland rather than with the country that their families had lived in for (in some cases) generations. But the fear was groundless. The United States never had a substantial Nazi-sympathizer movement — and the closest thing to it were the “isolationists,” who were interested in staying map of america and mexico of World War II not because they were map of america and mexico to Germany, but because they didn’t feel any connection to Europe.


27) Japanese internment camps

All Aboard Magazine

During World War II, fears of an immigrant fifth column led President Franklin D. Roosevelt to order 120,000 Japanese Americans into internment camps in the western United States. The majority of internees were American citizens, and many were born in the United States. Internment ended in 1944, before Japan surrendered to the United States. But many internees had bank of america cherry hill new jersey their homes and belongings. Several thousand German Americans and Italian Americans, among others, were also put into camps during World War II. But the scope of the Japanese internment is striking — especially because no Japanese American was ever found guilty of espionage.


28) Langston Hughes’s doodles turn a pro-immigrant map into an anti-Jim Crow one

Emma Bourne/Council Against Intolerance In America

While other Americans worried that immigrants were a threat to a country at war, the Council Against Intolerance made this illustrated map to argue the opposite: that prejudice itself would weaken the United States against its enemies. It’s a relatively early example of an idea that’s become popular in recent decades: that diversity itself is what makes America strong, and that difference is something to be celebrated rather than eliminated. This particular copy of the council’s map was owned by Langston Hughes, who penciled in a couple of illustrations of his own — including a burning Ku Klux Klan cross near Louisiana — making the point that the people most interested in preserving differences between groups tend to be the ones least interested in tolerance.


A bordered country

29) This is what the border actually is

Popularly, “the border” is a line between United States and Mexico. But officially, it’s a 100-mile area that stretches all the way around the United States — covering as much as two-thirds of the nation’s population. The legal definition of the border matters because the government has long said it can do things “at the border” to track down unauthorized migration and smuggling that it can’t do other places, from setting up “checkpoints” within the United States to check drivers’ citizenship to straight-up racial profiling. As recently as 2011, Border Patrol officers were boarding buses in upstate New York to ask passengers for IDs, and responding to police calls in Forks, Washington. New guidance from the federal government, which came out in December 2014, has opened the door to narrowing the definition of the “border” — but it’s not clear whether it will.


30) The militarization of the US/Mexico border

border militarization mapJoss Fong/Vox

Increasing border security is a very recent phenomenon: the number of Border Patrol agents on the United States/Mexico border has more than quadrupled from 1995 to 2014. The militarization of the border hasn’t been evenly spaced: it’s concentrated on the areas that people are most likely to cross. The buildup was supposed to stop unauthorized entrances, but it also made it harder for unauthorized immigrants to leave the United States if they ever wanted to return. Immigrants who were used to splitting time between their jobs in the United States and their families at home moved their families to the United States instead — and the unauthorized population grew, and settled.


31) A volunteer effort to identify immigrants who died crossing the border

Источник: https://www.vox.com/2015/1/12/7474897/immigration-america-maps
Search filters
  • Vector map of the border districts in the United States and Mexico along the border - Stock ImageVector map of the border districts in the United States and Mexico along the borderVector map of the border districts in the United States and Mexico along the borderhttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/vector-map-of-the-border-districts-in-the-united-states-and-mexico-along-the-border-image356604723.html
  • Tijuana, City at the Mexico USA Border on the World Map - Stock ImageTijuana, City at the Mexico USA Border on the World MapTijuana, City at the Mexico USA Border on the World Maphttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-tijuana-city-at-the-mexico-usa-border-on-the-world-map-102888022.html
  • united states-mexico border map - Stock Imageunited states-mexico border mapunited states-mexico border maphttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-united-states-mexico-border-map-125633212.html
  • Map of territory acquired by the United States in the Mexican-US War. Color lithograph - Stock ImageMap of territory acquired by the United States in the Mexican-US War. Color lithographMap of territory acquired by the United States in the Mexican-US War. Color lithographhttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-map-of-territory-acquired-by-the-united-states-in-the-mexican-us-war-20793371.html
  • mexico administrative and political vector map. - Stock Imagemexico administrative and political vector map.mexico administrative and political vector map.https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/mexico-administrative-and-political-vector-map-image212291684.html
  • El Paso, City at the USA Mexico Border on the World Map - Stock ImageEl Paso, City at the USA Mexico Border on the World MapEl Paso, City at the USA Mexico Border on the World Maphttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-el-paso-city-at-the-usa-mexico-border-on-the-world-map-102888021.html
  • Road vector map of the cross-border agglomeration San Diego-Tijuana, Mexico, United States - Stock ImageRoad vector map of the cross-border agglomeration San Diego-Tijuana, Mexico, United StatesRoad vector map of the cross-border agglomeration San Diego-Tijuana, Mexico, United Stateshttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/road-vector-map-of-the-cross-border-agglomeration-san-diego-tijuana-mexico-united-states-image368590521.html
  • aerial photo map of Nogales Arizona Mexico border - Stock Imageaerial photo map of Nogales Arizona Mexico borderaerial photo map of Nogales Arizona Mexico borderhttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-aerial-photo-map-of-nogales-arizona-mexico-border-47992348.html
  • Vector outline map of the Rocky Mountains in North America - Stock ImageVector outline map of the Rocky Mountains in North AmericaVector outline map of the Rocky Mountains in North Americahttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/vector-outline-map-of-the-rocky-mountains-in-north-america-image366666167.html
  • Map of the U S boundary disputes with Spain and Great Britain 1810 to 1812. Color lithograph - Stock ImageMap of the U S boundary disputes with Spain and Great Britain 1810 to 1812. Color lithographMap of the U S boundary disputes with Spain and Great Britain 1810 to 1812. Color lithographhttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-map-of-the-u-s-boundary-disputes-with-spain-and-great-britain-1810-17095996.html
  • aerial photo map of Nogales Arizona Mexico border - Stock Imageaerial photo map of Nogales Arizona Mexico borderaerial photo map of Nogales Arizona Mexico borderhttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-aerial-photo-map-of-nogales-arizona-mexico-border-47992439.html
  • mexiko road vektor map - Stock Imagemexiko road vektor mapmexiko road vektor maphttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-image-mexiko-road-vektor-map-164673748.html
  • Map of USA and Mexico. Highly detailed 3D rendering - Stock ImageMap of USA and Mexico. Highly detailed 3D renderingMap of USA and Mexico. Highly detailed 3D renderinghttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-map-of-usa-and-mexico-highly-detailed-3d-rendering-127057433.html
  • aerial photo map of Arizona Mexico border east of Nogales - Stock Imageaerial photo map of Arizona Mexico border east of Nogalesaerial photo map of Arizona Mexico border east of Nogaleshttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-aerial-photo-map-of-arizona-mexico-border-east-of-nogales-47992637.html
  • fictional map of the usa temperature barometric pressure wind speed wind direction - Stock Imagefictional map of the usa temperature barometric pressure wind speed wind directionfictional map of the usa temperature barometric pressure wind speed wind directionhttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/fictional-map-of-the-usa-temperature-barometric-pressure-wind-speed-wind-direction-image330651359.html
  • Map of USA and Mexico. Highly detailed 3D rendering - Stock ImageMap of USA and Mexico. Highly detailed 3D renderingMap of USA and Mexico. Highly detailed 3D renderinghttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-map-of-usa-and-mexico-highly-detailed-3d-rendering-127057426.html
  • aerial photo map of Arizona Mexico border east of Nogales - Stock Imageaerial photo map of Arizona Mexico border east of Nogalesaerial photo map of Arizona Mexico border east of Nogaleshttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-aerial-photo-map-of-arizona-mexico-border-east-of-nogales-47992555.html
  • Map of Mexico with national borders, main cities and rivers - Stock ImageMap of Mexico with national borders, main cities and riversMap of Mexico with national borders, main cities and rivershttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/map-of-mexico-with-national-borders-main-cities-and-rivers-image417238379.html
  • 3d render of USA map with New Mexico state highlighted - Stock Image3d render of USA map with New Mexico state highlighted3d render of USA map with New Mexico state highlightedhttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-3d-render-of-usa-map-with-new-mexico-state-highlighted-77805618.html
  • aerial photo map of trails along the Mexican Arizona border - Stock Imageaerial photo map of trails along the Mexican Arizona borderaerial photo map of trails along the Mexican Arizona borderhttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-aerial-photo-map-of-trails-along-the-mexican-arizona-border-47961396.html
  • Administrative and political vector map of the three North American states, Mexico, Canada and the United States of America - Stock ImageAdministrative and political vector map of the three North American states, Mexico, Canada and the United States of AmericaAdministrative and political vector map of the three North American states, Mexico, Canada and the United States of Americahttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/administrative-and-political-vector-map-of-the-three-north-american-states-mexico-canada-and-the-united-states-of-america-image230192548.html
  • North America countries border map. vector map of U.S. and Canada, Mexico. - Stock ImageNorth America countries border map. vector map of U.S. and Canada, Mexico.North America countries border map. vector map of U.S. and Canada, Mexico.https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/north-america-countries-border-map-vector-map-of-us-and-canada-mexico-image419030653.html
  • aerial photo map of Mexican American border Tijuana Mexico - Stock Imageaerial photo map of Mexican American border Tijuana Mexicoaerial photo map of Mexican American border Tijuana Mexicohttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-aerial-photo-map-of-mexican-american-border-tijuana-mexico-47183895.html
  • Administrative vector map of the cross-border agglomeration San Diego-Tijuana, Mexico, United States - Stock ImageAdministrative vector map of the cross-border agglomeration San Diego-Tijuana, Mexico, United StatesAdministrative vector map of the cross-border agglomeration San Diego-Tijuana, Mexico, United Stateshttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/administrative-vector-map-of-the-cross-border-agglomeration-san-diego-tijuana-mexico-united-states-image368690366.html
  • North America countries border map. vector map of U.S. and Canada, Mexico. - Stock ImageNorth America countries border map. vector map of U.S. and Canada, Mexico.North America countries border map. vector map of U.S. and Canada, Mexico.https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/north-america-countries-border-map-vector-map-of-us-and-canada-mexico-image419030710.html
  • aerial map view above Mexican American border Nogales Arizona Mexico - Stock Imageaerial map view above Mexican American border Nogales Arizona Mexicoaerial map view above Mexican American border Nogales Arizona Mexicohttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-aerial-map-view-above-mexican-american-border-nogales-arizona-mexico-30693324.html
  • simple colored louisiana state physical vector map - Stock Imagesimple colored louisiana state physical vector mapsimple colored louisiana state physical vector maphttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/simple-colored-louisiana-state-physical-vector-map-image233624593.html
  • North America countries border map. vector map of U.S. and Canada, Mexico. - Stock ImageNorth America countries border map. vector map of U.S. and Canada, Mexico.North America countries border map. vector map of U.S. and Canada, Mexico.https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/north-america-countries-border-map-vector-map-of-us-and-canada-mexico-image419030591.html
  • aerial photo map Mexican American border at Calexico Mexico Mexicali California - Stock Imageaerial photo map Mexican American border at Calexico Mexico Mexicali Californiaaerial photo map Mexican American border at Calexico Mexico Mexicali Californiahttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-aerial-photo-map-mexican-american-border-at-calexico-mexico-mexicali-43216764.html
  • Colorful united states administrative and political vector map - Stock ImageColorful united states administrative and political vector mapColorful united states administrative and political vector maphttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/colorful-united-states-administrative-and-political-vector-map-image368882606.html
  • aerial map view above Tijuana Mexico at San Ysidro Mexican American border crossing - Stock Imageaerial map map of america and mexico above Tijuana Mexico at San Ysidro Mexican American border crossingaerial map view above Tijuana Mexico at San Ysidro Mexican American border crossinghttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-aerial-map-view-above-tijuana-mexico-at-san-ysidro-mexican-american-35323646.html
  • Mexico map - Stock ImageMexico mapMexico maphttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-mexico-map-100346938.html
  • North America countries border map. vector map of U.S. and Canada, Mexico. - Stock ImageNorth America countries border map. vector map of U.S. and Canada, Mexico.North America countries border map. vector map of U.S. and Canada, Mexico.https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/north-america-countries-border-map-vector-map-of-us-and-canada-mexico-image419030663.html
  • Usa and Mexico border map with national flags, vector illustration - Stock ImageUsa and Mexico border map with national flags, vector illustrationUsa and Mexico border map with national flags, vector illustrationhttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/usa-and-mexico-border-map-with-national-flags-vector-illustration-image230972528.html
  • mexico administrative map - Stock Imagemexico administrative mapmexico administrative maphttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-mexico-administrative-map-123070703.html
  • North America countries border map. vector map of U.S. and Canada, Mexico. - Stock ImageNorth America countries border map. vector map of U.S. and Canada, Mexico.North America countries border map. vector map of U.S. and Canada, Mexico.https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/north-america-countries-border-map-vector-map-of-us-and-canada-mexico-image419030624.html
  • Usa and Mexico border map with national flags, vector illustration - Stock ImageUsa and Mexico border map with national flags, vector illustrationUsa and Mexico border map with national flags, vector illustrationhttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/usa-and-mexico-border-map-with-national-flags-vector-illustration-image230971076.html
  • simple vector map of the state mexico - Stock Imagesimple vector map of the state mexicosimple vector map of the state mexicohttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-simple-vector-map-of-the-state-mexico-101736579.html
  • North America countries border map. vector map of U.S. and Canada, Mexico. - Stock ImageNorth America countries border map. vector map of U.S. and Canada, Mexico.North America countries border map. vector map of U.S. and Canada, Best mortgage refinance rates in texas width="902" height="1084" alt="Texas state map with neighboring states - Stock Image">Texas state map with neighboring statesTexas state map with neighboring stateshttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/texas-state-map-with-neighboring-states-image246986311.html
  • Wall between USA and Mexico. Highly detailed 3D rendering - Stock ImageWall between USA and Mexico. Highly detailed 3D renderingWall between USA and Mexico. Highly detailed 3D renderinghttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-wall-between-usa-and-mexico-highly-detailed-3d-rendering-127057424.html
  • simple colored texas state physical vector map - Stock Imagesimple colored texas state physical vector mapsimple colored texas state physical vector maphttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/simple-colored-texas-state-physical-vector-map-image233624548.html
  • Usa and Mexico border map with national flags, vector illustration - Stock ImageUsa and Mexico border map with national flags, vector illustrationUsa and Mexico border map with national flags, vector illustrationhttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/usa-and-mexico-border-map-with-national-flags-vector-illustration-image230923249.html
  • Wall between USA and Mexico. Highly detailed 3D rendering - Stock ImageWall between USA and Mexico. Highly detailed 3D renderingWall between USA and Mexico. Highly detailed 3D renderinghttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-wall-between-usa-and-mexico-highly-detailed-3d-rendering-127057429.html
  • florida administrative vector map - Stock Imageflorida administrative vector mapflorida administrative vector maphttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-image-florida-administrative-vector-map-164669960.html
  • cartoon border wall between USA and Mexico - Stock Imagecartoon border wall between USA and Mexicocartoon border wall between USA and Mexicohttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/cartoon-border-wall-between-usa-and-mexico-image332603948.html
  • Cute cartoon New Mexico state character clipart. Illustrated map of state of New Mexico of USA with state name. Funny character design for kids game, - Stock ImageCute cartoon New Mexico state character clipart. Illustrated map of state of New Mexico of USA with state name. Funny character design for kids game,Cute cartoon New Mexico state character clipart. Illustrated map of state atlantic federal credit union topsham New Mexico of USA with state name. Funny character design for kids game,https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/cute-cartoon-new-mexico-state-character-clipart-illustrated-map-of-state-of-new-mexico-of-usa-with-state-name-funny-character-design-for-kids-game-image388108319.html
  • florida administrative vector map with flag - Stock Imageflorida administrative vector map with flagflorida administrative vector map with flaghttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-image-florida-administrative-vector-map-with-flag-164669956.html
  • Glenn Spencer of the American Border Patrol, Hereford, Arizona, USA, shows a map of the U.S./Mexico border. - Stock ImageGlenn Spencer of the American Border Patrol, Hereford, Arizona, USA, shows a map of the U.S./Mexico border.Glenn Spencer of the American Border Patrol, Hereford, Arizona, USA, shows a map of the U.S./Mexico border.https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-glenn-spencer-of-the-american-border-patrol-hereford-arizona-usa-shows-58020462.html
  • Roads, political and administrative map of the Western United States of America.eps - Stock ImageRoads, political and administrative map of the Western United States of America.epsRoads, political and administrative map of the Western United States of America.epshttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-roads-political-and-administrative-map-of-the-western-united-states-134106125.html
  • aerial map view above southern San Diego bay at US Mexico border Imperial Beach Olf Ream field airport - Stock Imageaerial map view above southern San Diego bay at US Mexico border Imperial Beach Olf Ream field airportaerial map view above southern San Diego bay at US Mexico border Imperial Beach Olf Ream field airporthttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-aerial-map-view-above-southern-san-diego-bay-at-us-mexico-border-imperial-24559028.html
  • Vector map of the Great Basin in the western United States - Stock ImageVector map of the Great Basin in the western United StatesVector map of the Great Basin in the western United Stateshttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/vector-map-of-the-great-basin-in-the-western-united-states-image418971012.html
  • A close up <a href=wells fargo drive through hours near me Texas and the U.S./Mexican border on a puzzle map. - Stock Image">A close up of Texas and the U.S./Mexican border on a puzzle map.A close up of Texas and the U.S./Mexican border on a puzzle map.https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-a-close-up-of-texas-and-the-usmexican-border-on-a-puzzle-map-54412135.html
  • detailed vector map of North America, Mexico, Canada and the United States - Stock Imagedetailed vector map of North America, Mexico, Canada and the United Statesdetailed vector map of North America, Mexico, Canada map of america and mexico the United Stateshttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/detailed-vector-map-of-north-america-mexico-canada-and-the-united-states-image417117901.html
  • Globe, close-up on USA and Canada - Stock ImageGlobe, close-up on USA and CanadaGlobe, close-up on USA and Canadahttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-globe-close-up-on-usa-and-canada-77805629.html
  • Map of the Rio Grande, Rio Bravo Drainage Basin, Mexico, United States - <a href=Where is there a huntington bank near me Image">Map of the Rio Grande, Rio Bravo Drainage Basin, Mexico, United StatesMap of the Rio Grande, Rio Bravo Drainage Basin, Mexico, United Stateshttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/map-of-the-rio-grande-rio-bravo-drainage-basin-mexico-united-states-image401915795.html
  • Bordering map of USA with State of New Mexico marked with red color. - Stock ImageBordering map of USA with Midland states bank routing number rockford il of New Mexico marked with red color.Bordering map of USA with State of New Mexico marked with red color.https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/bordering-map-of-usa-with-state-of-new-mexico-marked-with-red-color-image155675904.html
  • cartography, historical maps, modern times, colonial empires and colonial conflicts in 19th century, historic, historical, - Stock Imagecartography, historical maps, modern times, colonial empires and colonial conflicts in 19th century, historic, historical, colonialism, England, Great Britain, France, Netherlands, Spain, Portugal, Belgium, Russia, Italy, Germany, Japan, Europe, America, Africa, Asia, Australia, Hudson Bay Company, Mexico, USA, Cuba, Carribean, Peru, South America, Brazil, Argentinia, Paraguay, border conflict, French West Africa, Fadoscha, Egypt, South Africa, Congo, India, Indonesia, China, Phillipines, world map, CEAM,cartography, historical maps, modern times, colonial empires and colonial conflicts in 19th century, historic, historical, colonialism, England, Great Britain, France, Netherlands, Spain, Portugal, Belgium, Russia, Italy, Germany, Japan, Europe, America, Africa, Asia, Australia, Hudson Bay Company, Mexico, USA, Cuba, Carribean, Peru, South America, Brazil, Map of america and mexico, Paraguay, border conflict, French West Africa, Fadoscha, Egypt, South Africa, Congo, India, Indonesia, China, Phillipines, world map, CEAM,https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-cartography-historical-maps-modern-times-colonial-empires-and-colonial-19857002.html
  • Vector map of the Texan El Paso County, United States - Stock ImageVector map of the Texan El Paso County, United StatesVector map of the Texan El Paso County, United Stateshttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/vector-map-of-the-texan-el-paso-county-united-states-image399264743.html
  • Mexico on world map - Stock ImageMexico on world mapMexico on world maphttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/mexico-on-world-map-image349138118.html
  • north America map - Stock Imagenorth America mapnorth America maphttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-north-america-map-96546441.html
  • Immigration Reform concept on US-Mexico border map with United States and Mexico flags - Stock ImageImmigration Reform concept on US-Mexico border map with United States and Mexico flagsImmigration Reform concept on US-Mexico border map with United States and Mexico flagshttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/immigration-reform-concept-on-us-mexico-border-map-with-united-states-and-mexico-flags-image243189860.html
  • North America vector map. Usa canada mexico world map icon, american continent - Stock ImageNorth America vector map. Usa canada mexico world map icon, american continentNorth America vector map. Usa canada mexico world map icon, american continenthttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/north-america-vector-map-usa-canada-mexico-world-map-icon-american-continent-image428872560.html
  • barbed wire or border of USA for the protection of a country at the end of a country or river shore with a cloudy sky - Stock Imagebarbed wire or border of USA for the protection of a country at the end of a country or river shore with a cloudy skybarbed wire or border of USA for the protection of a country at the end of a country or river shore with a cloudy skyhttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/barbed-wire-or-border-of-usa-for-the-protection-of-a-country-at-the-end-of-a-country-or-river-shore-with-a-cloudy-sky-image379266718.html
  • Immigration Reform concept on US-Mexico border map with United States and Mexico flags - Stock ImageImmigration Reform concept on US-Mexico border map with United States and Mexico flagsImmigration Reform concept on US-Mexico border map with United States and Mexico flagshttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/immigration-reform-concept-on-us-mexico-border-map-with-united-states-and-mexico-flags-image243190204.html
  • Usa and Mexico border map with national flags, <a href=which island in the keys has the best beaches illustration - Stock Image">Usa and Mexico border map with national flags, vector illustrationUsa and Mexico border map with national flags, vector illustrationhttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/usa-and-mexico-border-map-with-national-flags-vector-illustration-image231181110.html
  • Gulf of Mexico, shaded relief map. - Stock ImageGulf of Mexico, shaded relief map.Gulf of Mexico, shaded relief map.https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-gulf-of-mexico-shaded-relief-map-29599182.html
  • Immigration Reform concept on US-Mexico border map with United States and Mexico flags - Stock ImageImmigration Reform concept on US-Mexico border map with United States homes for rent in nevada trails las vegas Mexico flagsImmigration Reform concept on US-Mexico border map with United States and Mexico flagshttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/immigration-reform-concept-on-us-mexico-border-map-with-united-states-and-mexico-flags-image243189749.html
  • Gulf of Mexico, shaded relief map. - Stock ImageGulf of Mexico, shaded relief map.Gulf of Mexico, shaded relief map.https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-gulf-of-mexico-shaded-relief-map-29603836.html
  • Satellite view of the US - Mexico Border (with country boundaries). This image was compiled from data acquired by - Stock ImageSatellite view of the US - Mexico Border (with country boundaries). This image was compiled from data acquired by Landsat 7 & 8 satellites.Satellite view of the US - Mexico Border (with country boundaries). This image was compiled from data acquired by Landsat 7 & 8 satellites.https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-satellite-view-of-the-us-mexico-border-with-country-boundaries-this-112373462.html
  • Immigration Reform concept on US-Mexico border map with United States and Mexico flags - Stock ImageImmigration Reform concept on US-Mexico border map with United States and Mexico flagsImmigration Reform concept on US-Mexico border map with United States and Mexico flagshttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/immigration-reform-concept-on-us-mexico-border-map-with-united-states-and-mexico-flags-image242980835.html
  • New Mexico counties vector map outline with USA map colors national flag - Stock ImageNew Mexico counties vector map outline with USA map colors national flagNew Mexico counties vector map outline with USA map colors national flaghttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/new-mexico-counties-vector-map-outline-with-usa-map-colors-national-flag-image407210265.html
  • State of New Mexico on map of USA - Stock ImageState of New Mexico on map of USAState of New Mexico on map of USAhttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/state-of-new-mexico-on-map-of-usa-image227263129.html
  • Immigration Reform concept on US-Mexico border map with United States and Mexico flags - Stock ImageImmigration Reform concept on US-Mexico border map with United States and Mexico flagsImmigration Reform concept on US-Mexico border map with United States and Mexico flagshttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/immigration-reform-concept-on-us-mexico-border-map-with-united-states-and-mexico-flags-image243190097.html
  • historical aerial photograph Mexican American border El Paso Texas Ciudad Juarez Mexico 1974 - Stock Imagehistorical aerial photograph Mexican American border El Paso Texas Ciudad Juarez Mexico 1974historical aerial photograph Mexican American border El Paso Texas Ciudad Juarez Mexico 1974https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-historical-aerial-photograph-mexican-american-border-el-paso-texas-47167001.html
  • The traditional cultural areas of the North American indigenous peoples vector map. - Stock ImageThe traditional cultural areas of the North American indigenous peoples vector map.The traditional simple bible com areas of the North American indigenous peoples vector map.https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/the-traditional-cultural-areas-of-the-north-american-indigenous-peoples-vector-map-image222168503.html
  • Immigration Reform concept on US-Mexico border map with United States and Mexico flags - Stock ImageImmigration Reform concept on US-Mexico border map with United States and Mexico flagsImmigration Reform concept on US-Mexico border map with United States and Mexico flagshttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/immigration-reform-concept-on-us-mexico-border-map-with-united-states-and-mexico-flags-image243190339.html
  • historical aerial photograph Mexican American border El Paso Texas Ciudad Juarez Mexico 1964 - Stock Imagehistorical aerial photograph Mexican American border El Paso Texas Ciudad Juarez Mexico 1964historical aerial photograph Mexican American border El Paso Texas Ciudad Juarez Mexico 1964https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-historical-aerial-photograph-mexican-american-border-el-paso-texas-47166991.html
  • merrimack county savings bank jobs height="1060" alt="New Mexico NM state Map USA with Capital City Star at Santa Fe. Black silhouette and outline isolated on a white background. EPS Vector - Stock Image">New Mexico NM state Map USA with Capital City Star at Santa Fe. Black silhouette and outline isolated on a white background. EPS VectorNew Mexico NM state Map USA with Capital City Star at Santa Fe. Black silhouette and outline isolated on a white background. EPS Vectorhttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/new-mexico-nm-state-map-usa-with-capital-city-star-at-santa-fe-black-silhouette-and-outline-isolated-on-a-white-background-eps-vector-image401531814.html
  • Immigration Reform concept on US-Mexico border map with United States and Mexico flags - Stock ImageImmigration Reform concept on US-Mexico border map with United States and Mexico flagsImmigration Reform concept on US-Mexico border map with United States and Mexico flagshttps://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1https://www.alamy.com/immigration-reform-concept-on-us-mexico-border-map-with-united-states-and-mexico-flags-image243190266.html
Источник: https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo/usa-border-map-mexico.html

First-ever Map and Priority Restoration Areas of Border Wall through Arizona and New Mexico Released

The first publicly available map documenting the U.S.-Mexico border wall through New Mexico and Arizona was released Tuesday. The map depicts completed sections of border wall as well as other related construction activities and is the most accurate, detailed and up-to-date documentation of new sections of border wall completed during the Trump Administration.

The map, produced by the nonprofit Wildlands Network, was developed through remote sensing and extensive on-the-ground fieldwork to assess what was completed and the progress of sections that were not completed. The Great Old Broads for Wilderness assisted in on-the-ground surveys through portions of Arizona.

AZ & NM Border Barriers 2021 v1-1.jpg

Following the April announcement by the Biden Administration that it would end border wall construction contracts and shift funding to restoration, the map is an important resource for understanding where remediation and removal of border walls should be prioritized.

“The borderlands have long been an essential region for the continental movement of wildlife,” said Myles Traphagen, borderlands coordinator for Wildlands Network who led the mapping effort. “Unfortunately, border wall construction has impacted some of the highest value wildlife habitat and areas that are most important for wildlife migration in the region.”

In addition to the map, Wildlands Network has also released a StoryMap that highlights six priority restoration areas in Arizona and New Mexico. In New Mexico, these include sites in the Whitewater Mountains and the Carrizalillo Mountains. The priority restoration areas in Arizona include sites in the Patagonia Mountains, Pajarito Mountains and San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge – all of which are in desperate need of immediate restoration.

“Following the Biden Administration’s announcement that remaining funds would be shifted to restoration, there were many questions about how much money remained, who would lead restoration, and where restoration would be prioritized,” said Michael Dax, Western program director for Wildlands Network. “For Arizona and New Mexico, we believe these are the areas where restoration must occur to protect the unique natural resource values, including wildlife migration.”

Numerous species including deer, pronghorn, bear, javelina and mountain lion have been impacted by the wall, which has isolated these binational populations. Additionally, a jaguar was recently spotted in the Sky Islands of southeastern Arizona—only the seventh sighting in the past 25 years. Connectivity between the U.S. and Mexico will be essential for the species’ long-term recovery, especially as more animals attempt to travel north into historically occupied habitats.

IMG_1477_Credit Myles Traphagen, Wildlands Network.jpg

Beginning in March 2019, Wildlands Network started mapping the proposed border wall projects from court documents that described the planned locations. Over the ensuing two years, the team used drones, ground-based photos and GPS to track the project.

When construction was halted on January 20, 2021, Wildlands Network marked the endpoints of construction to ensure that the stop work order had not been violated. At that point, staff systematically drove nearly every mile of the border in New Mexico and Arizona to document cases of severe environmental destruction and hazards, as well as to identify locations where the wall had not been completed and other gaps in the wall that wildlife can use. 

“We found that there was a lot of shoddy construction and many places where contractors had not figured out how to deal with drainages that are prone to flash floods when strong desert downpours occur,” says Traphagen. “We also found that most of the flood gates installed that are designed to be opened during periods chase online banking login in heavy rains were welded shut, with no possibility to open them in a timely fashion should flooding occur.” 

Wildlands Network, which map of america and mexico on the protection of large-scale habitat and corridors for wildlife in North America, is working to ensure wildlife can safely traverse political boundaries, like the U.S.-Mexico border and other human-made barriers to ensure their natural movements.

“There has been a lot of misinformation around the border wall and its construction,” says Dax. “Our hope is that this map will be a resource for the Biden Administration and congressional leaders when directing funding towards remediation and restoration of the borderlands, and we look forward to working with leaders to restore this ecologically important landscape.”

###

Contact:

Michael Dax, Western Program Director
[email protected], 518-598-3442

Resources:

  • To view the interactive map, click here

  • To read the StoryMap, click here

  • To access a folder of press images, click here

Since 1991, Wildlands Network has been committed to reconnecting, restoring and rewilding North America so that life—in all its diversity—can thrive. Our work is founded in science, driven by fieldwork and furthered through strategic policy and partnerships. We envision a North America where nature is undivided, and where people coexist in harmony with our native plants and animals.

Border wallArizonaNew Mexico

Источник: https://wildlandsnetwork.org/news/first-ever-map-of-border-wall-released

Beach and hotels in Cancún, Quintana Roo.

 

 

Central America

 

Copyright © Geographic Guide - Maps of World. American Continent.

 

 

Map California

 

Central America

 

Antilles map

 

 

 

 

 

Physical Map of Mexico and Central America

 

 

 

Maps Continents

 

 

 

Источник: http://www.maps-world.net/central-america.htm

Map of america and mexico -

First-ever Map and Priority Restoration Areas of Border Wall through Arizona and New Mexico Released

The first publicly available map documenting the U.S.-Mexico border wall through New Mexico and Arizona was released Tuesday. The map depicts completed sections of border wall as well as other related construction activities and is the most accurate, detailed and up-to-date documentation of new sections of border wall completed during the Trump Administration.

The map, produced by the nonprofit Wildlands Network, was developed through remote sensing and extensive on-the-ground fieldwork to assess what was completed and the progress of sections that were not completed. The Great Old Broads for Wilderness assisted in on-the-ground surveys through portions of Arizona.

AZ & NM Border Barriers 2021 v1-1.jpg

Following the April announcement by the Biden Administration that it would end border wall construction contracts and shift funding to restoration, the map is an important resource for understanding where remediation and removal of border walls should be prioritized.

“The borderlands have long been an essential region for the continental movement of wildlife,” said Myles Traphagen, borderlands coordinator for Wildlands Network who led the mapping effort. “Unfortunately, border wall construction has impacted some of the highest value wildlife habitat and areas that are most important for wildlife migration in the region.”

In addition to the map, Wildlands Network has also released a StoryMap that highlights six priority restoration areas in Arizona and New Mexico. In New Mexico, these include sites in the Whitewater Mountains and the Carrizalillo Mountains. The priority restoration areas in Arizona include sites in the Patagonia Mountains, Pajarito Mountains and San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge – all of which are in desperate need of immediate restoration.

“Following the Biden Administration’s announcement that remaining funds would be shifted to restoration, there were many questions about how much money remained, who would lead restoration, and where restoration would be prioritized,” said Michael Dax, Western program director for Wildlands Network. “For Arizona and New Mexico, we believe these are the areas where restoration must occur to protect the unique natural resource values, including wildlife migration.”

Numerous species including deer, pronghorn, bear, javelina and mountain lion have been impacted by the wall, which has isolated these binational populations. Additionally, a jaguar was recently spotted in the Sky Islands of southeastern Arizona—only the seventh sighting in the past 25 years. Connectivity between the U.S. and Mexico will be essential for the species’ long-term recovery, especially as more animals attempt to travel north into historically occupied habitats.

IMG_1477_Credit Myles Traphagen, Wildlands Network.jpg

Beginning in March 2019, Wildlands Network started mapping the proposed border wall projects from court documents that described the planned locations. Over the ensuing two years, the team used drones, ground-based photos and GPS to track the project.

When construction was halted on January 20, 2021, Wildlands Network marked the endpoints of construction to ensure that the stop work order had not been violated. At that point, staff systematically drove nearly every mile of the border in New Mexico and Arizona to document cases of severe environmental destruction and hazards, as well as to identify locations where the wall had not been completed and other gaps in the wall that wildlife can use. 

“We found that there was a lot of shoddy construction and many places where contractors had not figured out how to deal with drainages that are prone to flash floods when strong desert downpours occur,” says Traphagen. “We also found that most of the flood gates installed that are designed to be opened during periods of heavy rains were welded shut, with no possibility to open them in a timely fashion should flooding occur.” 

Wildlands Network, which focuses on the protection of large-scale habitat and corridors for wildlife in North America, is working to ensure wildlife can safely traverse political boundaries, like the U.S.-Mexico border and other human-made barriers to ensure their natural movements.

“There has been a lot of misinformation around the border wall and its construction,” says Dax. “Our hope is that this map will be a resource for the Biden Administration and congressional leaders when directing funding towards remediation and restoration of the borderlands, and we look forward to working with leaders to restore this ecologically important landscape.”

###

Contact:

Michael Dax, Western Program Director
[email protected], 518-598-3442

Resources:

  • To view the interactive map, click here

  • To read the StoryMap, click here

  • To access a folder of press images, click here

Since 1991, Wildlands Network has been committed to reconnecting, restoring and rewilding North America so that life—in all its diversity—can thrive. Our work is founded in science, driven by fieldwork and furthered through strategic policy and partnerships. We envision a North America where nature is undivided, and where people coexist in harmony with our native plants and animals.

Border wallArizonaNew Mexico

Источник: https://wildlandsnetwork.org/news/first-ever-map-of-border-wall-released

Beach and hotels in Cancún, Quintana Roo.

 

 

Central America

 

Copyright © Geographic Guide - Maps of World. American Continent.

 

 

Map California

 

Central America

 

Antilles map

 

 

 

 

 

Physical Map of Mexico and Central America

 

 

 

Maps Continents

 

 

 

Источник: http://www.maps-world.net/central-america.htm

37 maps that explain how America is a nation of immigrants

American politicians, and Americans themselves, love to call themselves “a nation of immigrants”: a place where everyone’s family has, at some point, chosen to come to seek freedom or a better life. America has managed to maintain that self-image through the forced migration of millions of African slaves, restrictive immigration laws based on fears of “inferior” races, and nativist movements that encouraged immigrants to assimilate or simply leave.

But while the reality of America’s immigrant heritage is more complicated than the myth, it’s still a fundamental truth of the country’s history. It’s impossible to understand the country today without knowing who’s been kept out, who’s been let in, and how they’ve been treated once they arrive.


Where we come from

1) We’re all immigrants

US Census Bureau

This map from the 2000 census colors each county according to which country most of its residents cite as their “ancestry.” What might be most surprising about this map is the predominance of light yellow in Appalachia; in those counties, more people say their ancestry is simply “American” than anything else. But this is a strikingly recent phenomenon: the number of people saying their ancestry was “American” nearly doubled from 1990 to 2000. It’s amazing that in a country that’s been around for more than 200 years — with many family lineages having lived in the New World for even longer — most people are still able to identify their ancestry based on the countries in which their families lived before they immigrated to the United States.


2) The very first American migration

Even the first Americans were immigrants — it’s generally accepted that they came across “Beringia” (the land that’s now the Bering Strait, the body of water between Russia and Alaska) at least 20,000 years ago (and possibly as long as 30,000 years ago). But scientists are still trying to piece together when the first Americans came through Beringia; how many of them there were; and whether they came all at once, or in multiple waves.

This map, from a 2007 paper, is based on an analysis of mitochondrial DNA — which children inherit only from their mother, making it easier to trace one line back for many generations. The researchers hypothesize that the group that came to Beringia from Asia, approximately 25,000 years ago, actually stayed in Beringia for some time before some of them came through to the Americas. Then, however — according to this analysis — they populated the Americas fairly quickly, spreading as far south as Chile by 15,000 years ago. The analysis also suggests that some early Americans migrated back to Asia from Beringia, while other, newer waves of immigrants crossed to America.


3) America has more immigrants than anybody

Worldmapper.org

Later waves of European immigration killed off most of the first Americans (largely through European diseases, which traveled through the Americas much more quickly than European humans did). That set the stage for European Americans to rebrand the United States, in particular (where indigenous populations were almost completely “replaced”), as a “nation of immigrants.” Even today, America is still home to more total immigrants than any other country in the world. In this map, each country’s size is distorted to reflect the size of its immigrant population. It’s based on 2005 data, but a 2013 UN report shows that 19.8 percent of the world’s international migrants live in the United States.


4) ...but as a share of the population, the US doesn’t crack the top 10

As much as American politicians pat themselves on the back for representing “the most welcoming country in the world,” there are smaller countries that have been more open to immigrants in recent decades. So on this chart from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), which measures the percentage of each country’s population that was made up of immigrants in 2000 (the orange dot) and 2010 (the blue bar), America doesn’t even hit the top 10. Some of the countries that outrank the United States are tiny — it’s much easier for 40 percent of Luxembourg’s population to be immigrants, since the country has only 540,000 people, than it would be for the United States — but medium-size countries like Canada, Australia, and Spain also outrank the United States.


5) The simplest explanation of how immigration to America has changed

mexico germany immigration GIFPew Research Center

If this feature were called “A nation of immigrants in one map,” this is the one we’d show you. The bottom line: before 1965, Germany sent more immigrants to America than anyone else; after 1965, Mexico did.

Here’s why: from World War I to 1965, the immigration system was designed, essentially, to keep the United States white. Rice University sociologist Stephen Klineberg has called it “unbelievable in its clarity of racism.” Each country was given a certain quota of immigrants who were allowed to come to the United States each year, based on who’d been in the country in 1890.

Combined with existing laws that prevented any Asian Americans from coming into the country, the laws of the 1920s basically froze the demographics of the immigrant population in place until 1965.


6) The Danish Utahns, and other immigrant enclaves

where immigrants live@MetricMaps

This GIF, compiled by internet hero @MetricMaps, tracks where immigrants from different countries have settled in the United States. The result is an exhaustive portrait of more than two dozen different native countries and regions. Some ancestry groups pop up in interesting places, revealing forgotten pockets of American history — the Danish population in Utah, for example, is the result of an extremely early wave of Danish conversion to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons).


Forced migration, then and now

7) Forced migration built America

David Eltis and David Richardson/Atlas of the Transatlantic Slave Trade, reprinted with permission of Yale University Press

The American myth about “a nation of immigrants” excludes millions of forced migrants to America from Africa, who were brought to the US over two centuries of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. It’s hard to overstate how much slaves built America: according to historian Steven Deyle, the value of all slaves in 1860 was seven times the value of all currency then in circulation in the United States. Slave labor built the agrarian economy of the South and fed the cotton mills of the industrializing North. But slaves had no way to become citizens, build wealth, or bring their families — they had no opportunity to practice the self-reliance that America often expects of its immigrants.


8) The first illegal migrations were of trafficked slaves

The forced migration of Africans to America also represents the first unauthorized migration to the United States. The Constitution banned the “importation” (trafficking) of slaves into the United States after 1809, but black-market slave trading continued until the Civil War. According to historian David Eltis of Emory University, 1.5 million Africans arrived in the Americas after the countries they landed in had theoretically banned the slave trade. Because there were no restrictions on voluntary migration to the United States until the 1880s, these were the first people to come to the country illegally.

The Atlas of the Transatlantic Slave Trade documents 78,360 slaves landing in mainland North America from 1800 to 1865 — about 20 percent of all arrivals over the 200 years of the slave trade. (Since slave importation wasn’t banned until 1807, many of those arrivals could have been legal.)


9) Modern-day forced migration: human trafficking

Dave Eames and Mark Morris/Kansas City Star

Large-scale human trafficking is no longer legal, let alone widely condoned. But it still happens. This graphic is one attempt to map the global reach of the contemporary human-smuggling industry.

A report by the Urban Institute in 2014 interviewed 122 victims of labor trafficking in the United States, and found that 71 percent of those trafficked actually had legal visas when they arrived in the country. But because immigrant workers’ legal status is tied to their employer, most victims who escaped their traffickers had lost their legal status by the time they were connected to law enforcement. Furthermore, the report found, public officials often encountered labor-trafficking victims and failed to realize what was going on — or, worse, sided with the traffickers and threatened to report the victims to federal immigration agents.


A nation of immigrants

10) The most famous immigrant in American history

Give me your tired, your poor;
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free;
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore;
Send these, the homeless, tempest-toss’d, to me;
I lift my lamp beside the golden door.
—Emma Lazarus, 1883

Of course, the Statue of Liberty was itself an immigrant. It was designed and cast in copper in France over the span of a decade, from 1876 to 1884, as an intended gift from the French government to the United States. But the statue then had to wait in France for several months until the Americans had done enough work on its pedestal. It was then shipped to the United States in 350 separate pieces, housed in 214 crates, to be assembled by American workers once it arrived.


11) An insanely detailed map of immigrants in America from 1903

Frank P. Sargent/Commission-General of Immigration (via Michigan State University)

This exhaustive map includes 51 infographics (for each state plus Washington, DC). The right column of the infographic covers how many immigrants settled in the state each year; the left column shows their occupations. The top depicts the ethnic mix, color-coded by race: Teutonic, Keltic, Slavic, Iberic, Mongolic, and “all others.”

At the time, those racial labels were real — and the source of anxiety. A medical journal article from this era expressed concern about the “preponderance of the Iberic and Slavic races” among recent immigrants, because of “their poorer physical and mental equipment” compared to “Celtic and Teutonic” immigrants.


12) How charities helped immigrants become American

The organization Hull House (founded by Jane Addams) was devoted to serving Chicago’s urban poor; in the process, it set the template for charity in America. And most of Chicago’s urban poor were immigrants: in 1890, in fact, immigrants made up 77 percent of the city’s population. To better tailor its services to the communities it served (and to assist the federal government in its study of urban “ghettos”), Hull House researchers produced maps like this one, which shows the ethnicity of each immigrant family living in a given tenement block.

The result was that Hull House increasingly focused on teaching English, civics, and other skills that would help immigrants and first-generation Americans assimilate — what would be called the “Americanization” movement. The existence of organizations like Hull House, which were willing to take the time to help immigrants acclimate to America and learn things (like English) that they needed to succeed, was an important factor in helping the European immigrants of 100 years ago assimilate to the point where they simply counted as “white” Americans.


13) Are today’s immigrants less Americanized?

Claude S. Fischer, Mike Hout, Aliya Saperstein

The “Americanization” movement of the early 1900s wasn’t just about how to help immigrants. It was also grounded in the belief that immigrants should be welcomed to the United States only if they wanted to, and could, be successfully assimilated into America. That idea survives today, in everything from the metaphor of the country as a “melting pot” to the demand that immigrants “learn English.” But while “learning English” is shorthand for assimilation, and despite fears that this generation of immigrants is less assimilated than their forerunners, immigrants to America in the late 20th century were much more likely to know English when they got here, or to pick it up quickly, than the immigrants who lived at Hull House. Even Latino immigrants, who lag behind other immigrants (who tend to be more educated) in how long it takes them to speak English, perform much better than the European immigrants of the 1880s.


14) The grandchildren of today’s Latino immigrants barely speak Spanish

Pew Hispanic Trends Project

Second-generation Latinos — the children of immigrants — tend to be fully bilingual; this might mean they’re used to speaking with their parents in Spanish but using English outside the home, or just that they’re in situations where they deal with Spanish and English speakers pretty much equally. And with the third generation, who are grandchildren of immigrants, bilingualism fades quickly. In fact, the proportion of immigrants who speak mostly English (35 percent) is bigger than the share of Latinos who are thoroughly bilingual in the third generation.


15) Immigrants are saving the Midwest

More Americans are leaving Middle America than moving there (with the exception of North Dakota). But immigrants are forestalling Middle America’s demographic decline. A Chicago Council study in 2014 found four metro areas (including Davenport, Iowa, on the Illinois border, and Duluth in eastern Minnesota) that grew between 2000 and 2010 solely because of the immigrant population, and another five where immigrants made up more than 50 percent of the metro area’s total growth over that time. But immigrants might be having an even bigger impact in rural areas in Middle America, where the demographic crunch is most acute. In Kansas, immigrants make up 5.3 percent of the rural population; in Nebraska it’s 4.8 percent. Just as importantly, immigrants are making these areas demographically younger. The Chicago Council report found that Wichita, Kansas, for example, lost 24 percent of its 35- to 44-year-old, native-born population from 2000 to 2010 — but its immigrant population in that age range grew by 87 percent.


A nation of (immigration) laws

16) 200 years of immigration in one gorgeous visual

Natalia Bronshtein

It’s easy now to assume that Mexico has always been among the main sources of immigration to America. But as this wonderful chart by Natalia Bronshtein (using 200 years of government data) shows, that’s not even close to true. There’s an interactive version on Bronshtein’s website: you can hover over any color, at any point, and see the exact number of immigrants who became residents from that country in that decade. But taken as a whole, the chart tells a very clear story: there are two laws that totally transformed immigration to the United States.


17) The 1920s law that made immigration much less diverse — and created illegal immigration as we know it

Because the quota laws were passed in the early 1920s, but were based on immigration flows from 1890, they actually rolled back immigration from certain countries. Politicians were worried that new immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe (largely Italians and Jews) were genetically “inferior” immigrant stock was threatening Americans’ quality of life. This pair of maps, from the New York Times, shows the effects of the primary quota law: the National Origins Act of 1924. The map to the left of the slider shows annual immigration to America from various European countries before the law was passed; the map to the right of the slider shows the quotas imposed for each country under the law. The National Origins Act forced the legal immigrant population to plummet — and made “illegal immigration” a widespread phenomenon for the first time in American history. It hasn’t stopped since.


18) How America began to rely on Mexican labor

With World War II causing labor shortages, the United States started to encourage seasonal labor from Mexico. As the map shows, the 2 million braceros who came under the program (from 1942 to 1964) migrated from all over Mexico to most of the United States. Most worked in agriculture, under punishing conditions: according to some reports, braceros were sprayed directly with DDT (an insecticide now known to be carcinogenic and toxic to humans). The bracero program was supposed to prevent migrants from settling in the United States by sending 10 percent of their paychecks back to Mexico. But many braceros returned to Mexico only to discover their money had not. Many Mexican Americans are descended from braceros, and the memory of their mistreatment colors their opinions of guest-worker proposals today.


19) America’s only been a global destination for the past 50 years

The modern era of immigration to America began in 1965, when the restrictionist quotas of the National Origins Act were replaced by the Immigration and Nationality Act. It’s only in this era that immigration to the United States has really become a global phenomenon — with European and Mexican immigrants joined by Asian, Central and South American, and African immigrants. There are still more immigrants from some countries than from others — in 2013, there were twice as many naturalized US citizens from Mexico as from any other country — but as this chart shows, immigration to the United States has never been more globally balanced.


20) How to come here the right way

Mike Flynn, Shikha Dalmia, Terry Colon/Reason Magazine

From one perspective, there are plenty of ways to come to the United States legally — there’s an alphabet soup of visas, not to mention immigrant Americans’ ability to sponsor family members for green cards. But the overwhelming majority of the world’s non-American population isn’t eligible for any of these paths. In other words, there’s no legal immigration “line” for them to get into. Furthermore, there are far too many qualified applicants for most available visas — causing years-long (or even decades-long) backlogs for Mexican, Chinese, Indian and Filipino immigrants hoping to bring their parents, adult children, or siblings to the United States. This flowchart, from Reason Magazine, shows who’s able to come “the right way” and who isn’t. Spoiler alert: most aren’t, and most of those who are will have to wait a long time.


21) The era of unauthorized immigration: 1996–2006

Joe Posner/Vox

This chart documents the biggest wave of unauthorized migration in US history: from 1996, when the economy was booming and a law made it harder for unauthorized immigrants to “get legal,” to the US recession of the late 2000s. The line graph (and the left y-axis) shows how many immigrants entered the country illegally each year; the bar chart (and the right y-axis) shows the estimated number of unauthorized immigrants living in the United States at that time.


Nativism, then and now

22) One reason some Americans fear immigrants? They overestimate how many there are

Americans have an unfortunate tendency to overestimate how many people in the United States are immigrants — possibly because many white Americans assume that most Latinos in the United States are immigrants (and some assume most Latinos in the United States are unauthorized immigrants). Fears of America being overrun by immigrants make a little more sense if you think that a third of people living in the United States are immigrants already.


23) America’s first single-issue party was anti-immigrant

National Atlas of the United States

The American Party of the 1840s and 1850s was often called, and is remembered today as, the “Know-Nothing Party.” In the 1856 presidential election, as shown here, Maryland sent its electoral votes to the party (which had nominated former President Millard Fillmore). The leading Know-Nothing in Congress, Lewis Charles Levin of Pennsylvania, was also the first Jewish member of the US Congress. American nativists have usually been more afraid of some kinds of immigrants than others — and one way for an immigrant to assimilate into American life is to play the “good immigrant,” attacking the bad ones.


24) When Louisville rioted against Catholic immigrants

The Public I

In 1855, the Know-Nothing Party was beginning to take over politics in Louisville, Kentucky. The night before a local election in August, Know-Nothings armed with torches paraded through the city’s Catholic areas, telling voters to “keep their elbows in.” That day — fueled by rumors that hundreds of armed Germans were taking over polling places, and that an Irishman had killed a Know-Nothing — the Know-Nothings exploded into wholesale rioting in the Irish and German sections of town. At least 22 people were killed — and probably many more. From the blog the Public I: “The death toll would have been higher but in the German district one of the first buildings looted was Armbruster’s brewery. The rioters got so drunk they could only satisfy themselves with torching the building before passing out.”


25) An 1885 “vice map” of San Francisco’s Chinatown

W. B. Farwell, John E. Kunkler, E. B. Pond/San Francisco Board of Supervisors

The first immigration restrictions in US history were passed in 1882, when the Chinese Exclusion Act more or less eliminated legal immigration from China. This created a market in human smuggling and trafficking — especially of young Chinese women. The US Customs and Border Protection website is still proud of the agency’s work in “kidnapping” Chinese women “in order to save them” from brothel owners and human traffickers. But as this “vice map of Chinatown,” created by the City of San Francisco, shows, attempts to “save” immigrant victims from their traffickers often bled into prejudice against the immorality of the immigrant community itself.


26) Fears of an immigrant “fifth column” bought into Nazi propaganda

One of the recurring themes in American nativism is the fear that immigrants will be more loyal to their native countries than to their adopted ones — including in times of war. This map, from a book of Nazi propaganda, tried to exploit those fears. It sent the message that every one of the 20 million German Americans in the United States could be counted on to stand with their homeland rather than with the country that their families had lived in for (in some cases) generations. But the fear was groundless. The United States never had a substantial Nazi-sympathizer movement — and the closest thing to it were the “isolationists,” who were interested in staying out of World War II not because they were loyal to Germany, but because they didn’t feel any connection to Europe.


27) Japanese internment camps

All Aboard Magazine

During World War II, fears of an immigrant fifth column led President Franklin D. Roosevelt to order 120,000 Japanese Americans into internment camps in the western United States. The majority of internees were American citizens, and many were born in the United States. Internment ended in 1944, before Japan surrendered to the United States. But many internees had lost their homes and belongings. Several thousand German Americans and Italian Americans, among others, were also put into camps during World War II. But the scope of the Japanese internment is striking — especially because no Japanese American was ever found guilty of espionage.


28) Langston Hughes’s doodles turn a pro-immigrant map into an anti-Jim Crow one

Emma Bourne/Council Against Intolerance In America

While other Americans worried that immigrants were a threat to a country at war, the Council Against Intolerance made this illustrated map to argue the opposite: that prejudice itself would weaken the United States against its enemies. It’s a relatively early example of an idea that’s become popular in recent decades: that diversity itself is what makes America strong, and that difference is something to be celebrated rather than eliminated. This particular copy of the council’s map was owned by Langston Hughes, who penciled in a couple of illustrations of his own — including a burning Ku Klux Klan cross near Louisiana — making the point that the people most interested in preserving differences between groups tend to be the ones least interested in tolerance.


A bordered country

29) This is what the border actually is

Popularly, “the border” is a line between United States and Mexico. But officially, it’s a 100-mile area that stretches all the way around the United States — covering as much as two-thirds of the nation’s population. The legal definition of the border matters because the government has long said it can do things “at the border” to track down unauthorized migration and smuggling that it can’t do other places, from setting up “checkpoints” within the United States to check drivers’ citizenship to straight-up racial profiling. As recently as 2011, Border Patrol officers were boarding buses in upstate New York to ask passengers for IDs, and responding to police calls in Forks, Washington. New guidance from the federal government, which came out in December 2014, has opened the door to narrowing the definition of the “border” — but it’s not clear whether it will.


30) The militarization of the US/Mexico border

border militarization mapJoss Fong/Vox

Increasing border security is a very recent phenomenon: the number of Border Patrol agents on the United States/Mexico border has more than quadrupled from 1995 to 2014. The militarization of the border hasn’t been evenly spaced: it’s concentrated on the areas that people are most likely to cross. The buildup was supposed to stop unauthorized entrances, but it also made it harder for unauthorized immigrants to leave the United States if they ever wanted to return. Immigrants who were used to splitting time between their jobs in the United States and their families at home moved their families to the United States instead — and the unauthorized population grew, and settled.


31) A volunteer effort to identify immigrants who died crossing the border

Источник: https://www.vox.com/2015/1/12/7474897/immigration-america-maps

Ornamental Map of the United States & Mexico

ENSIGN & THAYER. Ornamental Map of the United States & Mexico. New York: Ensign & Thayer, 1848. Lithograph map, with full original hand color, sheet dimensions: 31 x 23 inches (excellent condition, edges reinforced, slight chipping on top right edge). Created at a time of incredible expansion for the nation, this map boldly proclaims in no uncertain terms that America is poised to emerge as a dominant global force. 1848 was a pivotal year that saw the U.S. on the cusp of victory in the Mexican American War, which ended with Mexico being forced to cede almost half of her territory at the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo on the 4th of July of that year. Texas had become a state in 1845, and California, as well as the area to the north which would become Oregon and Washington State were being recognized as U.S. Territories. This sudden addition of land was the first major expansion of the country since the Louisiana Purchase and began the great migration to the west and southwest that continues to this day. Portraits of Generals Zachary Taylor and Winfield Scott-two heroes of the war with Mexico-flank a central image of a mythic-looking and approving George Washington framed in flags and sunbeams. At the base of the sheet, two scenes depict an ancient Mexican culture that has just be defeated by the upstart American conquerors. The "Panoramic View from New York to the Pacific Ocean by the Contemplated Oregon Railroad", located between the map and the top register, is a highly stylized cross-section of the newly transcontinental America. This pictorial expression of 'Manifest Destiny' anticipates the construction of a transnational railway more than twenty years before such an ambition was realized. In "An American Exhibiting to the Sovereigns of Europe the Progress of his country" a healthy Walt Whitman-looking figure in fashionable and casual dress stands on the battlement of a fort bristling with cannon, confidently gesturing to a vista depicting scenes that embody the virtues of America's natural resources and the ingenuity of her people. The European dignitaries are outfitted in stuffy formal garb and look sallow, old, paunched, and intimidated. The landscape features a crowded river filled with steam and sailing ships, rich farmlands dotting lush fields, and bold cloud-piercing mountains surmounted only by an ultra-modern balloon rising in the sky. This juxtaposition was meant to highlight the difference between the Old world and the New, with America as the leaders of the future-a message that the readers of that time must have heard loud and clear. This patriotic tableau, richly ornamented, was the ultimate statement that the popular notion of 'Manifest Destiny' was being fulfilled in the west. In the map of the United States and Mexico, which makes up the centerpiece of the tableau, the United States is shown to extend from sea to sea. Her new possessions include the vast new territory of 'New California', occupying all of the modern states of California, Nevada, Utah, and most of Arizona. New Mexico runs down the length of the upper Rio Grande, while an enlarged Texas (which became a U.S. state in 1845), prominently occupies the center of the map. Also featured is the Oregon Territory, in the Pacific Northwest, which officially became part of the U.S. in 1846, while the vast 'Missouri Territory' and the 'Indian Territory' (the latter still reserved for Native Americans) occupy most the Great Plains. References: Wheat, 'California Gold Fields', no.38; Wheat 'Mapping the Transmississippi West', no. 557. Location note: Texas drawer. Seller Inventory # 72GM07

Ask Seller a Question

Источник: https://www.abebooks.com/Ornamental-Map-United-States-Mexico-Ensign/19937696556/bd

Map of Mexico

Mexico has it all: vast cactus-strewn deserts, jungles dotted with ancient ruined pyramids, grand colonial cities and gorgeous Pacific and Caribbean coastlines. The richly varied culinary scene reflects a beguiling blend of Spanish and indigenous traditions, while vibrant markets supply perhaps the brightest and boldest crafts in the world. Use our map of Mexico to plan your journey to find the tastiest tacos, the most inspirational Rivera murals, the coolest tequila bars and the most challenging treks.

Mexico is rich in history; explore the tribal Oaxacan highlands; admire the Bonampak murals; or take in the cave art of Baja California, before heading to its beaches to spot whales. Whether you choose to explore the Zócalo in Mexico City or party on the long beaches of Caribbean coastline on the Riviera Maya, you’ll find plenty to see and do in Mexico.

If you are planning to travel, check out Mexico itineraries, read more on the best places to go in Mexico, learn about getting there and where to stay once you are there.

The Rough Guide to Mexico and related travel guides

In-depth, easy-to-use travel guides filled with expert advice.

Travel advice for Mexico

Find even more inspiration for Mexico here

previous photo
previous photo
Источник: https://www.roughguides.com/maps/north-america/mexico/

Gadsden Purchase, 1853–1854

The Gadsden Purchase, or Treaty, was an agreement between the United States and Mexico, finalized in 1854, in which the United States agreed to pay Mexico $10 million for a 29,670 square mile portion of Mexico that later became part of Arizona and New Mexico. Gadsden’s Purchase provided the land necessary for a southern transcontinental railroad and attempted to resolve conflicts that lingered after the Mexican-American War.

Map Depicting the Gadsden Purchase

While the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo formally ended the Mexican-American War in February 1848, tensions between the Governments of Mexico and the United States continued to simmer over the next six years. The two countries each claimed the Mesilla Valley as part of their own country. The Mexican Government demanded monetary compensation for Native American attacks in the region because, under the Treaty, the United States had agreed to protect Mexico from such attacks; however, the United States refused to comply, insisting that while they had agreed to protect Mexico from Native American attacks, they had not agreed to financially compensate for attacks that did occur. The persistent efforts of private American citizens to enter Mexico illegally and incite rebellions in an effort to gain territory exacerbated tensions between the governments.

These continuing tensions between Mexico and the United States complicated U.S. efforts to find a southern route for a transcontinental railroad as the only viable routes passed through Mexican territory. In 1847, the United States attempted to buy the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, an isthmus on the southern edge of North America, as an alternative means of providing a southern connection between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Mexico, however, had already granted Mexican Don José de Garay the right to build colonies for Americans on the isthmus with capital from the New Orleans Company. Fearing the colonists would rebel as those in Texas had, Mexican President Juan Ceballos revoked the grant, angering U.S. investors.

In 1853, Mexican officials evicted Americans from their property in the disputed Mesilla Valley. When the U.S. Government did not act, Governor William Lane of New Mexico declared the Mesilla Valley part of the U.S. territory of New Mexico. Mexican President Antonio de Santa Anna responded by sending troops into the valley. Attempting to defuse the situation, U.S. President Franklin Pierce sent James Gadsden, the new U.S. Minister to Mexico, to negotiate with Santa Anna. Secretary of State William Marcy instructed Gadsden to renegotiate a border that provided a route for a southern railroad, arrange for a release of U.S. financial obligations for Native American attacks, and settle the monetary claims between the countries related to the Garay project.

Mexican President Antonio de Santa Anna

Gadsden met with Santa Anna on September 25, 1853. President Pierce sent verbal instructions for Gadsden through Christopher Ward, an agent for U.S. investors in the Garay project, giving Gadsden negotiating options ranging from $50 million for lower California and a large portion of northern Mexico to $15 million for a smaller land deal that would still provide for a southern railroad. Ward also lied to Gadsden, stating the President wanted the claims of the Garay party addressed in any treaty concluded with the Mexican Government; however, President Pierce never gave Ward these instructions because he did not believe in government involvement in affairs between private companies and foreign governments. Santa Anna refused to sell a large portion of Mexico, but he needed money to fund an army to put down ongoing rebellions, so on December 30, 1853 he and Gadsden signed a treaty stipulating that the United States would pay $15 million for 45,000 square miles south of the New Mexico territory and assume private American claims, including those related to the Garay deal. The United States Government agreed to work toward preventing American raids along Mexico’s border and Mexico voided U.S. responsibility for Native American attacks.

With a great deal of difficulty resulting from the increasing strife between the northern and southern states, the U.S. Senate ratified a revised treaty on April 25, 1854. The new treaty reduced the amount paid to Mexico to $10 million and the land purchased to 29,670 square miles, and removed any mention of Native American attacks and private claims. President Pierce signed the treaty and Gadsden presented the new treaty to Santa Anna, who signed it on June 8, 1854.

After Gadsden’s Purchase a new border dispute caused tension over the United States’ payment, and the treaty failed to resolve the issues surrounding financial claims and border attacks. However, it did create the southern border of the present-day United States, despite the beliefs of the vast majority of policymakers at the time who thought the United States would eventually expand further into Mexico.

Источник: https://history.state.gov/milestones/1830-1860/gadsden-purchase

Map of Western Territories

Map of Western Territories/tiles/non-collection/c/c_001imgtile1.xml
Image courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration

Description

On December 5, 1848, President James K. Polk transmitted his annual message to Congress. He used this map as an exhibit to illustrate his desired plan for the land acquired through the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo that ended the Mexican-American War earlier in the year. The land included the present-day states of California, Nevada, and Utah, as well as parts of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Wyoming. The map shows the latitude of 36°30' established in the Missouri Compromise of 1820: Slavery was prohibited in the Louisiana Territory in areas north of this latitude, and Polk advocated extending the prohibition to the Pacific Ocean to cover the newly acquired acreage. The table on the left-hand side describes the territories and their boundaries and lists the square mileage of land that fell north and that fell south of 36°30'. The table on the right-hand side tallies the total square mileage of free states (454,340 square miles) and slave states in the Union (610,798 square miles). The Compromise of 1850, actually a series of different bills, resolved the status of the new territory and diffused sectional tension over slavery for a time.

Related Subjects

Источник: https://history.house.gov/Records-and-Research/Featured-Content/1848-Map-of-Western-Territories/

: Map of america and mexico

Is dark chocolate good or bad for you
FORECLOSED HOMES FOR SALE TULSA
Map of america and mexico
map of america and mexico
map of america and mexico

5 Replies to “Map of america and mexico”

  1. Video upload mattum pandringa..yevlo members doubt keakaraanga reply panna maateengala...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *