fast times at ridgemont high a true story

Fast Times at Ridgemont High by Cameron Crowe Digital E-Book Download Fireside Press (1981) edition This is a true story. In the fall of 1979, Cameron Crowe. This book was what came out of it. So, we're supposed to believe that it's all a true story, but it doesn't really come across as one. It reads like a. The film was written by Cameron Crowe, who based it off his 1981 book "Fast Times at Ridgemont High: A True Story," which found him going.
fast times at ridgemont high a true story

Fast times at ridgemont high a true story -

Netflix.

Accordingly, Is Fast Times at Ridgemont High a book?

Fast Times at Ridgemont High is a 1982 American coming-of-age comedy-drama film directed by Amy Heckerling (in her feature directorial debut), from a screenplay by Cameron Crowe, based on his 1981 book Fast Times at Ridgemont High: A True Story.

in the same way How many Oscars did Fast Times at Ridgemont High win?

Though “Fast Times” was ignored by the Academy, it features three Academy Award winning actors: Nicolas Cage, Sean Penn and Forrest Whitaker. Cage would later win an Oscar for Best Actor for “Leaving Las Vegas” (1995).

How old was Stacy in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

Stacy works at a pizza store at Ridgemont Mall along with her friend, Linda Barrett. Fans also wondered How old was Stacy in Fast Times at Ridgemont High? She was fifteen-year-old and also later got pregnant after her first sexual experience with Mike Damone.

Is Fast Times at Ridgemont High on Netflix Canada?

Yes, Fast Times at Ridgemont High is now available on Canadian Netflix.

Is Ridgemont High a real school?

“Ridgemont” is a fictional name. Crowe applied it to Clairemont High School in San Diego where he attended the school undercover. … Most of the exteriors of Ridgemont High School were shot at Van Nuys High School, and other scenes were shot at Canoga Park High School and Torrance High.

Is there a new Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

WILL THERE BE A FAST TIMES AT RIDGEMONT HIGH REMAKE? As of now, there are no plans to reboot Fast Times at Ridgemont High, so the live table read will have to suffice!

Why is Fast Times at Ridgemont High a classic?

Certainly, one of the reasons why it proved so popular at the time and has remained in the pop culture conversation is due to the film’s honest depiction of that milieu, gleaned via a rather unique endeavour. … On the surface, Fast Times has all the makings of a typical teen flick from the eighties.

Which actors won Fast Times at Ridgemont High Oscars?

Beyond this, Fast Times at Ridgemont High served as the start to a number of Oscar winners’ careers, including Nicolas Cage, Sean Penn, and Forest Whitaker.

Who are the twins in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

They played the silent twin bodyguards Igg and Ook in Hudson Hawk and as conjoined twin Addams family members Dexter and Donald in The Addams Family and Addams Family Values. They also played as the “angry twins” in Fast Times At Ridgemont High.

How old were actors in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

IMDb Rating: 7.2

Actor Age then Age now
Jennifer Jason Leigh 20 59
Judge Reinhold 25 64
Robert Romanus 26 65
Brian Backer 26 64

Who is the girl in the Corvette in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982) – Nancy Wilson as Beautiful Girl in Car – IMDb.

Is Pat Benatar in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

The character Pat Bernardo in Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982) was inspired by Benatar.

What school was used for Ridgemont High?

Fast Times at Ridgemont High was shot in Los Angeles, La Crescenta, and Santa Monica, California, USA. Filming locations included Canoga Park High School, Anderson W Clark Magnet High School, Santa Monica Place, Sherman Oaks Galleria, and Van Nuys High School.

Who got Stacy pregnant in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

The storyline in question follows 15-year-old sophomore Stacy Hamilton (Jennifer Jason Leigh) who starts off the school year as a virgin, only to become impregnated by fellow classmate Mike Damone (Robert Romanus).

How old were the actors in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

IMDb Rating: 7.2

Actor Age then Age now
Sean Penn 22 61
Jennifer Jason Leigh 20 59
Judge Reinhold 25 64
Robert Romanus 26 65

Was Julia Roberts in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

Julia Roberts voiced Jennifer Jason Leigh’s Stacy Hamilton while Matthew McConaughey and Dane Cook read the parts of Stacy’s love interests Mike Damone and Mark Ratner, respectively.

Is Fast Times at Ridgemont High a classic?

Thirty-five years later, Cameron Crowe’s coming-of-age teen movie is a timeless classic that continues to dole out life lessons.

What era was Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

Fast Times at Ridgemont High (United States, 1982) Because Fast Times at Ridgemont High arrived in movie theaters during the height of the ’80s “teenspoitation” era, it has often been unfairly lumped together with Porky’s and its successors and copycats.

Who is the pizza delivery guy in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

Comedian and actor Taylor Negron has died after a long battle with cancer. The 57-year-old was best known for his role as a pizza delivery boy in the 1982 comedy, “Fast Times At Ridgemont High.”

Why do they sniff the paper in fast times?

After the paper is passed out, the students put the page up to their noses and deeply inhale. This was a popular school ritual of the ’60s, ’70s and early ’80s as photocopying machines were very expensive, so ditto machines were used. The resulting copies did not get you high but they smelled good.

Is Nancy Wilson in fast times heart?

At the time, Wilson was 41 and undergoing fertility treatments, which were difficult to schedule around a rock tour and appearances. Wilson had played “Beautiful Girl in Car” in Crowe’s Fast Times at Ridgemont High, then had a small speaking part in The Wild Life.

What Led Zeppelin song is played in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

The scene immediately cuts to Rat driving love interest Stacy, blasting Led Zeppelin’s “Kashmir,” off their “Physical Graffiti” album — a glaring mistake to the band’s Zep fanatics.

Which Wilson sister was in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

Nancy Wilson in ‘Fast Times at Ridgemont High’ – Musician Movie Cameos. In the 1982 flick ‘Fast Times at Ridgemont High,’ a young Nancy Wilson of Heart caught the eye of Brad Hamilton (Judge Reinhold) at a streetlight.


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Fast Times at Ridgemont High (United States, 1982)

Because Fast Times at Ridgemont High arrived in movie theaters during the height of the '80s "teenspoitation" era, it has often been unfairly lumped together with Porky's and its successors and copycats. In reality, Fast Times is smarter and more perceptive. While teensploitation movies thrived on juvenilia, sex jokes, and nudity, Fast Times, like Valley Girl and The Last American Virgin, is character-based and character-driven. As a result, the humor and nudity - and there are plenty of each (including one of the most popular topless scenes of the '80s) - are more honest. When the final cut of Fast Times was delivered to the Universal Pictures executives, they didn't know what they had. The film was unceremoniously dumped into 500 theaters in August of 1982, and proceeded to surprise everyone by grossing more than ten times its budget. It has gone on to become a much-loved VHS and DVD title, earning nearly as much in rental dollars as it did during its theatrical run.

Despite being directed by newcomer Amy Heckerling, Fast Times is most commonly known as "a Cameron Crowe movie." Crowe wrote the screenplay, based on a book he penned about his experiences when he went back to high school posing as a senior. The film shares characteristics with Crowe's later directorial efforts (Say Anything, Jerry Maguire), including sharp dialogue and a pop-heavy soundtrack. Heckerling's contributions to the project are often overlooked in the zeal to attribute Fast Times to Crowe. It's not all that different from what occurs with This Is Spinal Tap, the rockumentary directed by Rob Reiner that is often credited to Christopher Guest (who co-wrote it then went on to make a series of mockumentaries with a similar approach).

Fast Times looks at a year in the life of a group of students attending Ridgemont High during the 1980s. Having been a member of the generation portrayed by the movie, I can attest to its accuracy in both broad strokes and details. However, one would expect nothing less from a Crowe script. Whatever his flaws, he has a history of authenticity when it comes to dialogue and character interaction. There is one area where Fast Times, like many high school themed movies, courts artificiality: actor age. The majority of the kids in this movie are supposed to be between 15 and 18. The actors, however, check in at 21 (Sean Penn), 19 (Jennifer Jason Leigh), 24 (Judge Reinhold), 25 (Robert Romanus), 25 (Brian Backer), and 20 (Forest Whitaker). Only Phoebe Cates, at 18, and Nicolas Cage, at 17, were in the proper age range. In some cases, like Leigh and Backer, the illusion works. With Penn, Reinhold, and Romanus, it's a stretch to accept them as being high school seniors unless one believes them to have been held back multiple times.

The movie's standout character is Jeff Spicoli (Penn), who has become one of those oft-imitated movie personalities. Spicoli is a surfer, a slacker, and a stoner. When asked why he doesn't get a job, he responds: "All I need are some tasty waves, a cool buzz, and I'm fine." During his senior year, he develops an ongoing feud with his history teacher, Mr. Hand (Ray Walston). This leads to several memorable confrontations (both inside and outside of the classroom) that indicate Mr. Hand may be the only one to get the upper hand on Spicoli.

Mark Ratner (Backer) is a high school virgin who is urged by his more experienced (but not necessarily more insightful) friend, Mike Damone (Romanus), to pursue a girl in his biology class who catches his eye. She's Stacy Hamilton (Leigh), who has decided to aggressively pursue losing her virginity. One that deed is done (with an older guy), she in interested in seeing if it will be better the second time around. Her older best friend, Linda Barrett (Cates), assures her it will be, so she decides to try with Mark. However, her forwardness scares him off - although the same cannot be said of Mike, who is more than willing to go after his buddy's would-be girlfriend. Meanwhile, Stacy's brother, Brad (Reinhold) is spending his final high school year working at fast food places, breaking up with his girlfriend, and fantasizing about Linda.

Fast Times is loaded with young talent. Some members of the cast would go on to long, successful careers while others would fade away. In the latter category are Backer and Romanus. This represented the career high-water mark for both of them. They're effective and believable in their Fast Times roles - Backer as the stereotypical shy nerd and Romanus as the guy who uses bravado to cover his insecurity - but both ended up filling supporting roles in TV series and indie movies. Cates took the path less traveled for an actress, making movies for about a decade after Fast Times then retiring to raise a family with her husband, Kevin Kline. Cates is still fondly remembered by Generation X males for her topless scene in Fast Times, which became the source material for numerous teenage masturbatory fantasies.

The most successful Fast Times alum is Sean Penn, who has gone on to worldwide acclaim. Taken in conjunction with his other roles, Fast Times illustrates amazing versatility. He is the perfect Spicoli, nailing every aspect of the character and becoming the movie's most memorable individual. Penn reportedly became so immersed in the role that even when the cameras weren't rolling, he demanded to be called Spicoli and never dropped the attitude. Whatever he may have done off-screen to fashion the on-screen man, it worked.

Jennifer Jason Leigh, who appears in some of Fast Times' most raw scenes (reportedly, she wanted to bare all but fears of an X-rating kept her pubic hair hidden), went on to become a daring and adaptable actress with a varied career that is still going strong. Likewise, Judge Reinhold achieved a measure of success by appearing in a number of high-profile family-friendly features. Other future stars who showed their faces in Fast Times: Eric Stoltz, Anthony Edwards, Forest Whitaker, and Nicolas Cage (credited as "Nicolas Coppola").

The only veteran actor in Fast Times is Ray Walston, who represents the lone adult with significant screen time. Before appearing in Fast Times, Walston was known primarily as Uncle Martin the Martian in My Favorite Martian. This movie introduced him to a new generation, for which he would forever be "Mr. Hand." It's a distinction Walston embraced to his dying day, glad to be known for more than one part.

Although Fast Times is primarily a comedy, it doesn't shy away from dealing with serious issues. Its depiction of sex is true to life. We are privy to Stacy's first and second sexual encounters, and both are less than satisfactory. The first occurs in a baseball dugout at night. She gazes at graffiti on a wall and wonders when it will be over. The second transpires in a bath house and is over so fast she doesn't have time to wonder. Movies often romanticize teenage sex; Fast Times goes in the opposite direction - a direction more viewers are likely to identify with. The film also deals with abortion and betrayal. Neither is typical material for a "teen comedy," yet both are evident in Fast Times, where they are treated deferentially.

Today, many who graduated from college in the '80s identify Fast Times as a favorite teen film because it does so much more than other movies in its sub-genre. The film is far from perfect - the soundtrack occasionally chooses the wrong songs, there are times when the acting (especially by the supporting players) falters, and there are scenes (most of them throw-ways) that don't work. Aside from jump-starting so many promising motion picture careers (including Crowe, Heckerling, and members of the cast), Fast Times will always be remembered for one thing: showing respect for and insight into the members of its core audience, something that was as rare in the 1980s as it is today.






Fast Times at Ridgemont High (United States, 1982)

Director: Amy Heckerling
Cast: Sean Penn, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Judge Reinhold, Robert Romanus, Brian Backer, Phoebe Cates, Ray Walston
Screenplay: Cameron Crowe, based on his book
Cinematography: Matthew F. Leonetti
Music:
U.S. Distributor: Universal Pictures


Источник: https://www.reelviews.net/reelviews/fast-times-at-ridgemont-high

Fast Times At Ridgemont High: 10 Awesome, Totally Awesome Behind-The-Scenes Facts

In the summer of 1982, a little teen comedy by the name of Fast Times at Ridgemont High came onto the scene and became one of the most iconic ’80s movies, making instant stars out of its large ensemble cast. Nearly 40 years later, Amy Heckerling’s cult classic, which was based on the real-life experiences of writer Cameron Crowe, remains just as righteous, and just as "awesome, totally awesome" as ever before.

But, as great as the movie is, some of the behind-the-scenes facts from the making of Fast Times at Ridgemont High are just as awesome, just as righteous, and just as entertaining as spotting a young Nicolas Cage flipping burgers at the local mall. Here are some of those stories.

Fast Times At Ridgemont High Is The Result Of Writer Cameron Crowe Spending A Year Undercover As A High School Senior

The story of Fast Times at Ridgemont High begins in 1979 when Cameron Crowe, who was writing for Rolling Stone at time time, published a book by the same name containing observations after spending a year undercover as a high school senior. Upon the release of the film in August 1982, The Washington Post published a lengthy profile on Crowe and his year masquerading as a 17-year-old even though he was well into his 20s at the time.

Over the course of nine months, Cameron Crowe acted as if he were just any normal student with the only people in on the gag being Ridgemont High School’s principal, his homeroom teacher, and several other instructors. When it came time to write the book, Crowe left himself out of the narrative and instead focused on six major characters, which would become the basis for teens featured in the movie three years later.

David Lynch Was Approached About Directing Fast Times At Ridgemont High Before Amy Heckerling Signed On

Amy Heckerling would famously make her directorial debut with Fast Times at Ridgemont High, but before the young filmmaker signed on to helm the teen comedy, the whole project could have gone in a very different direction. When speaking with Variety for the film’s 35th anniversary, Cameron Crowe revealed that a Universal Pictures executive really wanted David Lynch to direct, going as far as to invite to visionary director to the studio for a meeting:

He had a very wry smile on his face as I sat talking with him. He went and read it. We met again. He was very, very sweet about it, but slightly perplexed we thought of him. He said hit was a really nice story but ‘it’s not really the kind of thing that I do, but good luck.’ He got into the white VW bug and drove off.

Okay, who doesn’t want to see a Lynchian version of Fast Times now?

The Ridgemont Mall Scenes All Had To Be Shot At Night Because The Sherman Oaks Galleria Was Still In Operation

A large portion of Fast Times at Ridgemont High takes place at the Ridgemont Mall, which was filmed on location at the since-remodeled Sherman Oaks Galleria in Los Angeles. Since the mall was very munch in operation at the time, production on the movie had to take place during night, as director Amy Heckerling noted in Variety’s 35th anniversary piece. Something similar had been done at the Monroeville Mall in suburban Pittsburgh for Dawn of the Dead in 1978, though Fast Times didn’t have to worry about zombies getting drunk and wrecking golf carts between takes.

Nicolas Cage’s Experience On The Set Of Fast Times At Ridgemont High Led To Abandoning His Coppola Name

Like many actors, Nicolas Cage has used a stage name for the vast majority of his career, but there was one movie early on where he went by his legal name: Nicolas Coppola. The nephew of acclaimed filmmaker Francis Ford Coppola, Cage was just 17 years old when he joined the cast of Fast Times at Ridgemont High as “Brad’s Bud” at All-American Burger, and the experience, as he told The Hollywood Reporter, was enough for him to make a major change:

And I was surrounded by actors, whose names I won’t mention, who were not very open to the idea of a young guy named “Coppola” being an actor. So that movie was instrumental in me changing my name because of the kind of unfortunate responses to my last name.

In that same interview, Cage also revealed he originally auditioned for the role of Brad Hamilton (which later went to Judge Reinhold), but was rejected because his age prevented him from working long hours.

Jeff Spicoli’s Dream Sequence Originally Took Place On The Tonight Show With Johnny Carson

The original version of Jeff Spicoli’s dream sequence in the Fast Times at Ridgemont High book sees the resident stoner being interviewed on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, but the scene had to be changed prior to the start of production. According to The Uncool (the official website for all things Cameron Crowe), Carson, and several other talk show hosts including David Letterman and Merv Griffin turned down the opportunity, resulting in scene being completely rewritten to the one in the final version of the movie.

The Led Zeppelin IV Gaffe In Fast Times At Ridgemont High Was Written In Because The Studio Couldn’t Secure The Album’s Rights

There is the famous segment in Fast Times at Ridgemont High where Mike Damone (Robert Romanus) goes over his five-point plan to woo a girl to Mark “Rat” Ratner (Brian Backer) which involves playing side one of Led Zeppelin IV, only for the next scene to cut in with Rat playing Led Zeppelin’s rocking “Kashmir” while driving Stacy Hamilton (Jennifer Jason Leigh). When speaking with the New York Daily News, Cameron Crowe explained that this wasn’t a flub in the editing process but instead something to do with the publishing rights of the album. Crowe went on to say that a decision was made to imply that Rat had messed up his big moment with his crush.

There Was One Take Of The Iconic Bathroom Scene That Left The Studio In Shock

One of the hardest scenes in Fast Times at Ridgemont High to watch in a crowded room takes place when Linda Barrett (Phoebe Cates) walks in on Brad Hamilton (Judge Reinhold) pleasuring himself. And, while no full-frontal male nudity is shown, there was one unused take that writer Cameron Crowe said left studio executives laughing in shock, as he revealed in a 2017 interview on The Dan Patrick Show:

There was one take the director, Amy Heckerling, did just for the studio where the camera pans down to Judge and lets just say he was carrying a very large accessory that didn’t make it into the movie but made people laugh in shock.

That particular take has never been shown publicly, but the movie nearly had an X rating for a completely different scene.

Fast Times At Ridgemont High Originally Had An X Rating Because Of Male Genitalia

When making Fast Times at Ridgemont High, director Amy Heckerling wanted to flip the script so to speak and show male genitalia in the sex scene between Rat and Stacy instead of taking the commonly-taken route of showing a naked female. In the 35th anniversary piece on the movie in Variety, it was noted that when the MPAA watched the movie (and that specific scene), it gave it an X-rating, which would have severely limited the number of people who could see it in theaters. And while there was some resistance to changing the scene, Heckerling eventually decided to blur the shot and go with an R-rating.

Forest Whitaker Was Singing At The USC Conservatory When He Was Cast As Charles Jefferson

Forest Whitaker played the tough-as-nails high school football player Charles Jefferson in Fast Times at Ridgemont High, but when the future Academy Award winner auditioned for the role that would forever change his life, he was a student at the USC Conservatory and decided to audition with a few of his opera buddies. During a 2019 appearance on Live with Kelly and Ryan, Whitaker revealed that he didn’t expect to move into his acting career so quickly and went up to San Francisco to another conservatory immediately after filming his scenes.

Sean Penn, Who Remained In Character The Whole Time, Didn’t Introduce Himself Until The Final Day Of Shooting

Sean Penn may not enjoy acting anymore, but at one point in his career, he was one of the most notorious method actors in Hollywood, even when he was cast as Jeff Spicoli in Fast Times at Ridgemont High. To celebrate the 30th anniversary of the film’s release in 2012, Cameron Crowe shared a story with The Uncool about the final day of shooting decades earlier. Most of the writeup is about being nostalgic and proud of what they accomplished, but there’s a brief line about Penn that was just too good to pass up:

Sean Penn, who’d been in character the entire filming, arrived in a brown corduroy jacket and introduced himself. ‘I’m Sean,’ he announced.

And you thought Daniel Day-Lewis on the set of There Will Be Blood was something.

It’s hard to say if we’ll ever get another teen comedy like Fast Times at Ridgemont High, but there are still some contenders on the list of 2021 movies that could carve out a nice legacy for themselves one day.

Philip grew up in Louisiana (not New Orleans) before moving to St. Louis after graduating from Louisiana State University-Shreveport. When he's not writing about movies or television, Philip can be found being chased by his three kids, telling his dogs to stop yelling at the mailman, or yelling about professional wrestling to his wife. If the stars properly align, he will talk about For Love Of The Game being the best baseball movie of all time.

Источник: https://www.cinemablend.com/news/2572322/fast-times-at-ridgemont-high-awesome-totally-awesome-behind-the-scenes-facts

Translation of "ridgemont high" in Spanish

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It was after I saw Fast Times at Ridgemont High.

Fue después de que vi "Fast Times at Ridgemont High".

The following year, she appeared in the TV movie Babies Having Babies, and the short-lived series Fast Times, a TV adaptation of the 1982 film Fast Times at Ridgemont High (Wells played Linda Barrett, portrayed by Phoebe Cates in the film).

Al año siguiente apareció en la película Babies Having Babies y en la serie de breve duración Fast Times (Tiempos rápidos), una adaptación de la popular película de 1982 Aquel excitante curso (Fast Times at Ridgemont High).

I let you watch fast times at ridgemont high too early.

Te dejé ver Aquel excitante curso demasiado pronto.

Before the book was released, Fast Times at Ridgemont High was optioned for a film.

Antes de que el libro fuese publicado, los derechos de Fast Times at Ridgemont High ya habían sido vendidos para convertirse en una película.

His book, Fast Times at Ridgemont High: A True Story, came out in 1981.

El fruto de esas vivencias se plasmó en el libro Fast Times at Ridgemont High: A True Story (1981).

For me, Fast Times at Ridgemont High.

Para mi, Tiempos Rápidos en Ridgemont High.

You should watch "Fast Times at Ridgemont High".

Deberías ver "Tiempos Rápidos en la Alta Ridgemont".

"Madonna was married to this Ridgemont High alum."

¿Con qué alumno de la secundaria Ridgemont... estuvo casada Madonna?

Henley also contributed "Love Rules" to the 1982 Fast Times at Ridgemont High movie soundtrack.

Henley también contribuyó en "Love Rules" de la banda sonora de "Fast Times at Ridgemont High".

Your fast times at Ridgemont High quote, that proves you belong at the adult table.

Tu rapidez en la alta cotización de Ridgemont, eso prueba que perteneces a la mesa de los adultos.

Then watch Fast Times At Ridgemont High 1982, took and enjoy.

Ponte Fast Times in Ridgemont High (1982), fuma y disfruta.

Such is the same case for the song "The Critic" which is taken from the film Fast Times At Ridgemont High (1982).

También se tomó otra para la canción "The Critic" de la película Fast Times at Ridgemont High de 1982.

"Madonna was married to this Ridgemont High alum."

"Madonna estaba casada con este alumno de Ridgemont".

Vans later Nike Air Max 95 Womens sent the trainers to the production staff of "Fast Times At Ridgemont High" (1982), a Hollywood film that would go on to become a cult classic.

Más tarde, Vans envió a los entrenadores al equipo de producción de" Fast Times At Ridgemont High"(1982), una película de Hollywood que se convertiría en un clásico de culto. Aparecieron pesadamente. Las furgonetas seguirían vendiendo por millones.

Oingo Boingo appeared in a number of soundtracks in the early to mid-1980s, including Fast Times at Ridgemont High, which features "Goodbye, Goodbye".

Luego, la banda apareció en una serie de bandas sonoras en la primera mitad de la década de 1980, como en la de Fast Times at Ridgemont High, que cuenta con "Goodbye, Goodbye".

Since his film debut with a minor role in Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982), opposite Judge Reinhold and Sean Penn, Cage has appeared in a wide range of films, both mainstream and offbeat.

Desde su pequeño papel en Fast Times at Ridgemont High con Sean Penn, Cage ha aparecido en una gran variedad de películas, tanto convencionales como poco convencionales.

I watched "The Daily Show," fell into the best sleep I ever had, woke up, watched "Fast Times at Ridgemont High," had a vanilla-scented jacuzzi bath.

Miré Daily Show, he dormido como nunca me he despertado, he mirado Fast Times at Ridgemont High y me he hecho un jacuzzi a la vainilla

Following this success, Crowe wrote the screenplay for 1984's The Wild Life, the pseudo-sequel to Fast Times at Ridgemont High.

Después de aquel éxito, Crowe escribió el guion de The wild life, una pseudo secuela de Aquel excitante curso.

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Источник: https://context.reverso.net/translation/english-spanish/ridgemont+high

Book Vs. Film: Fast Times At Ridgemont High

SPOILER WARNING: Book Vs. Film is a column comparing books to the film adaptations they spawn, often discussing them on a plot-point-by-plot-point basis. This column is meant largely for people who've already been through one version, and want to know how the other compares. As a result, major, specific spoilers for both versions abound, often including dissection of how they end. Proceed with appropriate caution.

Book: Fast Times At Ridgemont High, Cameron Crowe, 1981

Film: Fast Times At Ridgemont High, adapted by Cameron Crowe, directed by Amy Heckerling, 1982

When I first set out to write my Better Late Than Never column about Amy Heckerling's Fast Times At Ridgemont High, I was vaguely aware of the background: Cameron Crowe started his career at 15, playing an adult role in society by writing for Playboy, Creem, Rolling Stone, and other high-profile publications. Seven years later, as a nominal adult, he reversed the formula by playing a much younger role. At age 22, he returned to high school and spent a year pretending to be a senior, so he could observe the wild American teenager in its native habitat and document what he learned. Fast Times At Ridgemont High was the book that came out of that experience, essentially a year in the life of a California high school. A year later, Crowe's screenplay version of the book was a hit teen sex comedy that still maintains a positive reputation today.

So what happened to the book, which is now out of print and fairly rare? (Worn paperback copies go for $40 and up online, according to a couple of reputable book search engines.) Why didn't Crowe's book go on to similar glory and a similarly warm place in the hearts of pop-culture addicts everywhere? After all, the two versions are very similar–virtually all the action in the film is right there in the original version.

The simple, direct, obvious answer is that the film had hit music, high levels of charisma from newbie actors who went on to be stars, and nubile naked breasts. That breast thing in particular likely made a big difference with the film's intended teen audience: The book just had boring old words on paper. But even accepting the book's boobless handicappitude, I think there's a little more going on, and frankly, I blame the way Crowe chose to frame the book. I strongly suspect that if he'd written it as more of a personal essay, more of a tell-all, more of a sociological "Here's what's going on with the kids of today, and here's what grown-ups think is going on, and here's why they're wrong" analysis rooted in the moment, that people would still be reading it today with fascination. Instead, what he gave us is framed as fiction, and it comes across as a fairly dull, plodding, unfocused novel.

Here's an excerpt, starting from page 2 of the book:

Stacy was a sweet-looking girl with long, blond hair and only the last traces of adolescent baby fat. An interesting thing had happened over the summer. She had caught the flu and had lost weight, and slimmed down to what her mother constantly reminded her was a "voluptuous figure." Stacy was not quite used to it yet. She had noted increased attention from boys, but as Linda Barrett pointed out, boys didn't count. The idea was to interest men.

Stacy had been working the cash register on the August night that The Vet first walked into Swenson's. He looked to be in his early 20s. He sat down at table C-9, clasped his bandless fingers in front of him, and ordered a French dip sandwich. Stacy watched as the main-floor waitresses all vanished into the back kitchen. He was kind of cute, she decided, in a blow-dry sort of way.

He kept staring at her. It wasn't Stacy's imagination. Even the other girls noticed. The man finished his sandwich, bypassed any ice-cream order, and walked directly over to Stacy with his check.

"So," he said, with a ready smile. "Are you working hard, or hardly working?"

Stacy smiled back–they were supposed to enjoy all customer jokes, unless obscene–and punched up the amount.

"Working hard," she said, with studied indifference. She took his ten-dollar bill. "Out of ten."

"Listen," the man said. "My name is Ron Johnson."

She counted back his change. "I'm Stacy."

"You really look like someone I'd like to know. I never really do this, but…" He pulled a business card from his wallet and wrote his home number on the back. "Why don't you give me a call sometime? I'd love to take you out for dinner. What do you say?"

Caught by surprise, Stacy reverted to the tone and phrasing she usually reserved for customers asking for substitutions on to-go orders. "I'll see what I can do."

"I look forward to hearing from you."

"Okay. Thank you, and have a nice evening."

As soon as he walked out of Swenson's, three waitresses beelined for Stacy.

"What's his name? What's his name?"

"What a total fox!"

"Does he work in the mall?"

Note the choppy, repetitively declarative sentences, the flat dialogue, the tell-don't-show style, the physical-appearance-as-characterization summary. If this was a straight-up fictional novel, I can't imagine it would have gone too far as a pop-culture artifact. It's pretty clumsy stuff. (Better than my writing when I was 22, sure, but none of that is in print either.)

And the shame of it is that Crowe's introduction, where he tells the story of how his experiment came about, is much more dynamic and involving. Over a few short pages, he talks about pitching his idea to a principal who was dubious until Crowe mentioned meeting Kris Kristofferson, at which point the principal was apparently so dazzled by this brush with fame that he let the whole project ride. Then he apparently forgot about it: Crowe mentions seeing him again at the end of the year, at which point "a fleeting look of panic crossed his face. Nine months later, it was as if he couldn't quite recall my name or where he knew me from." Crowe also talks about his first meeting with the girl he calls Linda Barrett (the Phoebe Cates character from the film), and about how people from that year of high school probably largely remember him as "the guy with the bad bladder," because he was always requesting bathroom trips so he could run outside and write down some telling piece of conversation he'd just overheard.

And finally, he talks in a few bare sentences about how his friends and family reacted to his experiment–their horror at how into "cars and the prom" he became during his second adolescence, and at how little he was writing professionally: "Magazine journalists, like P.O.W.'s and Turkish drug prisoners, are presumed dead if not heard from over two major holidays." Coming out of Crowe's intro to the book, I wanted much more of that kind of personal touch–his lively sense of humor, his reflections on the experiment, and above all, descriptions of what it was like sneaking into a high school and pretending to be a teenager again, especially given that he apparently wasn't much of a typical teenager back when he was a teenager.

As a sideline, compare all this to one of my favorite Harlan Ellison essays, "The Gang," from Memos From Purgatory. Ellison famously infiltrated a Brooklyn street gang when he was 23, as research for a novel. He hung out with them and went through a standard initiation, fucking a girl and fighting the gang to prove his commitment. Then he hung with them and fought alongside them for weeks before bailing. The essay is an observation of how those kids lived, what they did for fun, how they interacted, and what they thought and believed, but it's also an observation of Ellison's personal experiences, including his terror that they'd find him out as a phony, and the mental gymnastics he went through to stay in the game. It's far more interesting than the debut novel, Web Of The City, that came out of the experience.

And I think Fast Times the book needed that frank personal insight. Crowe did something authentically brave and interesting and unique, and he had a chance to file a detailed report on an extraordinary experience that virtually no one else is likely to have. Instead, he gave us a clunky, choppy novel billed as "a true story," though it contains any number of things that are hard to take as fact.

Without the intro, there'd be no reason to believe that Fast Times is based on real life instead of being pure clumsy fiction. About the only time Crowe as author interferes in the narrative is in a very brief–and yet tellingly entertaining–rapturous comment about the teen buzzword that was apparently all the rage when he went back to school: "wussy," an amalgam of "wimp" and "pussy" that wasn't as mild as the former or as dirty as the latter, but summed up the contempt of both.

All that is the downside. The upside, naturally, is that Crowe's book Fast Times At Ridgemont High is full of ground-level observations of teenagers on their own turf, and as such, it's reasonably involving. Most of the film was taken directly from the book, and just condensed or streamlined. Here's the scene from the film that came out of the scene from the book excerpted above:

Maybe it's just Jennifer Jason Leigh's shy charm as Stacy Hamilton, and maybe it's that Crowe cut a lot of the book's unnecessary dialogue for this scene, and the description is all right there on her face. Either way, the scene is fleeter and sweeter on film. But you can see where the dialogue and scenario came straight from the book.

Most of the film comes directly from the book in similar fashion, given that Crowe wrote both based on the same experiences. But he tweaked the story considerably for the film, tightening it up and focusing on just a few characters, seemingly to give it more of a story arc, and in some cases, possibly to make it more palatable for audiences of the day. One of the more notable plot changes is that in the film, Ron ("The Vet") takes Stacy out to The Point on their first date and deflowers her; she's shy, but more than willing, even eager, to get this rite of passage out of the way. In the book, they go on several dates, he refuses to make a move, and she gets impatient and consults Linda, who tells her "Most guys are just pussies… So I started making the first move, and you know what else? Most guys are just too insecure and too chicken to do it themselves." So Stacy meaningfully suggests that Ron take her to the Point, and she's the one who kisses him on the mouth, suggesting he go further, and he seems… well, shy, but more than willing. (Maybe Crowe and director Amy Heckerling thought that an America that was barely ready for teen girls who wanted sex wasn't yet ready for teen girls who practically had to mug guys to get it.) In the film, he sends her flowers afterward but never calls again, in a "Wham, bam, thank you ma'am" sort of move; in the book, he continues to call her and angle for more dates, but she's done with him, because she's sick of hiding him from her mom and lying about her age. After a round of speculative note-passing between her and Linda, she writes him a disingenuous letter revealing that she's only 15. Only then does he stop bugging her. Later, during her abortion crisis, she calls him seeking solace, but he nervously gives her the quickest brush-off possible, before even hearing why she's calling.

Another major book-vs.-film difference: In the film, surfer-dude Spicoli (Sean Penn) is a clownish but sympathetic figure, the affable, relateable stoner in us all, whereas in the book, he's more obviously being mocked every time Crowe observes him. Crowe never comes out and says "Look how dumb this guy is," but the slant of the stories about Spicoli all point in that direction. For instance, in the scene where a student named Louis Crowley loses his father and sister when their car is smashed over the side of a bridge by a reckless driver. Everything is somber until Spicoli charges into Louis' journalism class, obliviously lofting a newspaper featuring photos of the accident: "'Look at these bitchin' photos of the crash,' boomed Jeff Spicoli. 'You can see the people inside and everything.' Everyone froze. No one spoke. Louis Crowley hung his head and began to sob. It would be another month before anyone spoke to Jeff Spicoli again."

Losing scenes like that may help make Spicoli more palatable in the film, but Penn's bantery cheerfulness and infectious grin are also a large part of the change. I also wonder if he improv-ed some of his scenes; the dialogue in the Spicoli scenes is further from the dialogue in the book than most of the rest of the film, with some of his most notable lines (telling a wave "Hey, bud, let's party!"; telling a friend "That was my freakin' skull! I'm so wasted!") not appearing in the book at all.

The last really major difference between the book and the film involves Charles Jefferson, Forest Whitaker's character. In the film, Charles shows up as a high-school football star, with little more characterization than "scary big black dude"; the book, by contrast, gets into his family life, his desire to not "be anyone's 'black friend,'" the racist taunts that drove him away from high-school football, his coach's successful bid to get a huge cash influx for the school's losing football team by re-recruiting Charles Jefferson, and Jefferson's general attitude of "fuck this, I'm headed for the majors" defiance throughout his senior year. There's also a fairly amazing story where he hijacks a city bus and makes it take him directly home because his car is in the shop and he's in a bad mood. (This is before Spicoli wrecks his car; at this point, it's apparently just having maintenance done.) The cops come to question Jefferson about the incident, but he denies it; he's banned from city busses thereafter, but he's fine with that. Eventually, he's arrested for involvement in a robbery with two dudes who break into a Radio Shack after a party. He loses his scholarship and effectively ceases to exist as far as the school is concerned.

The whole dealing with Charles Jefferson is one of the many places where Crowe's authorial voice would have been immensely welcome, to clear up exactly how much of Fast Times is conjecture, amalgamation, or outright fiction. How would he know any of these things about a solitary, angry kid who doesn't speak to people? Are all the stories Crowe tells about him just passed-on rumors? Given how overblown the gossipy retellings of Spicoli's "You dick!" encounter with Mr. Hand become, how could Crowe trust any stories about such an overblown, widely feared kid? Given that this is all presented in a fictionalized setting anyway, how much of it is real, and how much of it does Crowe actually meant to be taken as real?

At any rate, the film is a relatively faithful adaptation of maybe half of the book. While a few characters were condensed into each other–in the book, the school scalper and Mike Damone are two different people, for instance–and a lot of scenes were left out, the ones that made it into the film are generally kept close to the source. For instance, here's the book's version of the famous scene where Brad Hamilton (Judge Reinhold) masturbates to a mental image of Linda Barrett, and she walks in on him:

A short film unreeled in his mind. This film featured Linda Barrett, just as she stood on the diving board a moment ago. She was gorgeous. Her breasts seemed even bigger than usual. Her nipples were hard, poking through the filmy maroon string bikini. Water rolled slowly down her cheeks into the corners of her mouth. Her lips were parted slightly. Her eyes were filled with desire.

"Hi, Brad," she said in the daydream, "you know how cute I always thought you were. I think you're so sexy. Will you come to me?"

In the daydream, Brad was wearing a nice shirt. His hair was combed back and looking great. He walked to Linda. She reached out and grabbed him for a kiss, pulling him close. Then she pushed him away so he could watch as she carefully unstrapped the top of her bathing suit. The incredible Linda Barrett breasts fell loose. She took Brad's hands and placed them on her as she began unbuttoning his shirt. They were just about to fall into passionate teenage love making when Brad heard…

"Hey Brad? Got any Q-ti…"

There was a swift knock at the bathroom door and then–Jesus–it just opened. The words I'm in here stalled in Brad's mouth.

There stood the real-life Linda Barrett, her top very much still on. She was standing in the doorway, paralyzed by the sight before her. Poor Brad was kneeling on the bathroom floor, a sizable erection shriveling in his hand.

"Sorry," she said, "I didn't know anybody was in here." Linda Barrett pulled the door shut as if she wanted to forget what she saw as quickly as possible. They would never again discuss the incident.

Brad stared down into the toilet bowl, still not believing what had happened. It was funny how everything could just turn around on you in a matter of seconds. Brad slammed the toilet bowl cover down. "Doesn't anyone fuckin' knock any more?" he said.

(As a side note here, I once again wound up wondering where this story came from. Who spilled the beans about this encounter, exactly? Did the real-life "Brad" actually fess up about what was going through his head? As with so many scenes in Fast Times the book, it's all but impossible to believe that everything really happened as Crowe captured it; the difficulty of verifying stories like this is likely why he wrote from a fictional standpoint. That, and to protect these poor, embarrassed bastards.)

Still, the book contains a ton of material that was left out, likely for clarity and for run time, with entire storylines and characters omitted completely. Here are a whole bunch of details that didn't make it to the final cut of the film:

• Mr. Hand (the brusque, hilarious teacher played by Ray Walston) is revealed as being obsessed with Steve Garrett, the chief detective from Hawaii 5-0. He imitates Garrett's mannerisms and speech patterns to the point where students apparently ask him every year why he acts so much like that guy. He always responds "I don't know what you're talking about."

• Linda and Stacy go to the free clinic together to get Stacy on birth control once she's sexually active. Linda, an old pro at this business, tells Stacy exactly what to say and do in order to make sure she gets on the pill and doesn't just get a diaphragm, apparently the birth control of choice for less sexually active girls.

• Linda is in a complicated relationship with a 20-year-old; they're engaged and she shows off her engagement as a mark of her maturity over mere high-school boys, but at the same time, she and her fiancé see very little of each other. She treats him like a weapon against people she doesn't want to date or sleep with, while not letting him get in the way of people she does. There's also a fairly harrowing story about how Linda and Stacy became friends: Linda was a bad kid who sold and did copious amounts of drugs, until she ODed and her drug buddies panicked and dumped her outside at a closed mall. Afterward, "Linda set about courting the straightest girl she knew," basically making Stacy into a friend by force of will, and remodeling her life after Stacy's more clean-cut one.

• Stacy's semi-love interests Mike Damone and Mark "The Rat" Ratner (Robert Romanus and Brian Backer in the film) are actually a little undercharacterized in the book, but more details about their pasts are forthcoming, particularly how they met, when they both worked at Marine World and Damone faked epileptic fits to freak people out. There's also an ongoing plotline where The Rat attempts to chat up Stacy, who works at the student information desk, by asking her for information he doesn't actually want or need. Sometimes he just hovers by the information desk, trying to work out when to approach so he gets to talk to her instead of the other person working the desk.

• Brad doesn't get fired from his plum fast-food job at Carl's Jr. for threatening to kick a customer's ass; a bitchy female customer goes out of her way to get him in trouble, and his manager purposefully frames him as a thief in order to get rid of him. Meanwhile, all the friends he brought on to work with him refuse to stand up for him, to his disgust and fury. He gets fired from his second job (at Jack-In-The-Box) for threatening to kick a customer's ass.

• The "we want to be called Spirit Bunnies" scene in the book is much more protracted, and comes from established characters, rather than being a joke line from nowhere. The book includes a lot of descriptions and little scenelets featuring key players at Ridgemont, most of whom become background texture in the film, or are omitted entirely.

• There's a whole section on Spirit Week (or "TOLO Week," which somehow stands for "totally outrageous"), when everyone dresses up in costumes. Crowe offers up some suspiciously committed handicapping on the big homecoming king and queen race, with all the contenders explored as if by someone who really cares about who wins. Incidentally, the football coach's big rallying cry, revealed during the homecoming section, is "HQA! Hellfire! Quickness! Agility!" Which, you know, just rolls comfortably off athletes' tongues and gets them all fired up to play.

• While Spicoli and his brother do wreck Charles Jefferson's car, and they do set it up to look like a rival school did it, the comedic sequence from the film where Charles Jefferson takes out his fury on that school is much less pronounced in the book, and just amounts to a mild note that he makes one fairly determined touchdown, possibly because of his anger over his car.

• One prominent character from the book, Steve Shasta, is left entirely out of the movie, possibly because the movie winds up being a coming-of-age sex comedy largely about Stacy, so there's no room for observations about a guy who's getting a great deal of sex himself. Shasta is a self-aggrandizing blowhard who spends a lot of time in the local media, talking about his sports successes in highly printable, colorful soundbites. He also tells everyone in school that he's celibate, because he's saving all his strength for soccer. This makes him seem inaccessible and mysterious, and gets him a lot of blowjobs from a lot of girls, including Linda Barrett herself. The book includes a number of colorful Steve Shasta stories; he's about as big a character as Linda or Spicoli or The Rat.

Whew. Yes, I'm aware that at this point, this column rivals the length of the book, but given how hard it is to lay hands on the book, that doesn't seem as embarrassing as it might be. Besides, I haven't used the word "penis" nearly enough yet in this column. To that end… The book also includes many, many, many little scattered vignettes, amounting to a page or two apiece. Among the most interesting:

• some business about School Picture Day, where Damone persuades Rat to moon the camera during the all-class shot. The two of them later wind up consigned to the school gym, glumly erasing Rat's ass-crack from every copy of the school yearbook;

• a sequence where Spicoli, called upon to give a speech in class, tells an obviously improvised story about how Mick Jagger personally gave him the necklace he's wearing, after they did coke together. The class, assigned to collectively grade him, gives him a D. (A version of this scene was reportedly filmed);

• a bunch of random plot threads following Ridgemont High's "dean of discipline," a hardcore adult bully who wears cop suits and acts like a cop, except when trying to make friends with Charles Jefferson, who tells him to go fuck himself. Eventually, he pulls a gun on Spicoli, claiming he mistook Spicoli's bong for a shotgun. He's subsequently sued and fired;

• a sequence where a tremendously charismatic paraplegic class-ring salesman comes through and successfully sells rings to most of the school, even people who had no interest in them before hearing his nostalgic, manipulative, "I remember the good old high school days before I crippled myself in a car crash…" sales pitch;

• a sequence where some eerily glib, robotic Frisbee champs come in to do a school presentation on behalf of Frisbee, unaware that they aren't appearing at a college. This doesn't keep them from hitting on the older girls;

• various funny late-night phone conversations between Linda and Stacy, about boys, dating, and what exactly constitutes "a total orgasm";

• an unusually long and detailed but detached sequence chronicling the high-school talent show, where various people show off obnoxiously, and Spicoli is "merciless" about playing a loudly beeping handheld football game during acts that bore him;

• Damone notices a pimple near his penis and obsesses about possibly having VD. Eventually, he exposes himself to the assistant P.E. coach, asking for his input, and enduring a joke about the possibility that Damone caught something from the coach's wife;

• meanwhile, The Rat measures his own penis, worrying about average sizes, whether he's underendowed, and how to measure honestly. He later mail-orders a penile extender called the "Exer-Gro Plus," unsure what form it will take. It turns out to be "a rubber dickhead" designed to be worn on the end of his cock to "lengthen" it visually. He tries it. It falls off and slides down his pant leg while he's shopping in Safeway;

• the suicide of a little-known and little-loved student causes a popular teacher to lecture every one of her classes about their self-absorption and selfishness, and they're all cowed and considerate, "for about two weeks";

• an April Fool's day prank draws 30 Hendrix impersonators of varying talent to the school to audition for a supposed Off-Broadway tribute to the guitarist. Once they learn it's just a prank, they decide Jimi would have wanted them to jam, so they take over the cafeteria and play for an hour and a half before someone cuts off the electricity;

• a long graduation-night sequence follows various characters' attempts to procure booze and sex during a nighttime trip to Disneyland;

• Brad writes himself a fairly touching letter about graduation and his hopes for the future, designed to be delivered 10 years later.

Finally, there's the matter of Stacy's abortion. In the film, this sequence is refreshing in a number of ways: It's frank (surprisingly so, for a sex comedy), it's brief rather than being a wallow in miserablism or humiliation, and it's up-front both about the fact that abortion can be depressing, scary, and off-puttingly clinical, but that it doesn't necessarily serve as a life-changing moral experience that makes people stop wanting sex. In other words, it's fairly realistic about the emotional impact and the experience itself.

Crowe's original version is about the same–but with a lot more detail, both about the lead-up and the procedure. In the film, Damone (who got Stacy pregnant) agrees to help pay for the abortion and to drive Stacy to the clinic, but he never shows up to drive her, seemingly embarrassed about the whole thing and uncomfortable with the cost. In the book, they fight about the pregnancy. ("You made me do it!" he whines about the sex. "You wanted it more than me!") He stands her up. She reschedules. Damone stands her up again, paralyzed with panic and immaturity. ("All he wanted to do was go away, forget about this problem. Why wouldn't it just go away? Why did it fall on him? She'd had just as much fun as he; it was her responsibility, too. Things like this weren't supposed to happen when you had The Attitude.") Finally, Stacy goes on her own, and Crowe dedicates a couple of careful pages to what an abortion is like, and how Stacy feels during and afterward.

Which is one of the few places where the book seems to have a clear agenda: To let people vicariously experience something they might never endure in real life. Take it as a warning, as an exercise in empathy for young sexually active males, or whatever else, Crowe is unflinching and rational about it, much as he is with the rest of the book. He doesn't judge, and he doesn't editorialize. It's the one part of the book that's probably better off without his intruding personal voice.

So. Book, or Film? The film, as mentioned earlier, is faster, fleeter, and more fun, whether you're looking for one-liners, early celebrity sightings, memorable music, or boobs. For the film, Crowe cropped a lot of the rabbit trails and ephemera, and concentrated on a few strong, well-played characters and a couple of specific story arcs. The book is like his primitive first draft of the story he built with the film, and it amounts to a mildly interesting curiosity at best. But it does have some pretty funny stories.

Next in Book Vs. Film: A much shorter and sweeter look at a comic novel that spawned a very different comic movie.

All previous Book Vs. Film entries are archived here.

Источник: https://www.avclub.com/book-vs-film-fast-times-at-ridgemont-high-1798214433
Film Registry

Fast Times at Ridgemont High - A True Story

Citation preview

by CAMERON CROWE

Simon and Schuster

New York

Copyright © 1981 by Cameron Crowe All rights reserved including the right of reproduction in whole or in part in any form Published by Simon and Schuster A Division of Gulf &• Western Corporation Simon (5- Schuster Building Rockefeller Center 1230 Avenue of the Americas New York, New York 10020 SIMON AND SCHUSTER and colophon are trademarks of Simon i_

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The last thing The Rat and Damone did on their Grad Nite was get an old-fashioned picture taken on Main Street. It was a frozen moment in time. Definitely scrapbook material all the way. It was The Rat who took the seat next to Charles Jefferson on the way home. He didn't mind. Charles took a long time to notice him, however, pleading for the seat. "But my teddy bear's sitting there," complained Charles. "Aw . . . go 'head." He, too, was offered a corner, but only after the bus was in motion. The sun rose while the five buses were still cruising on the freeway, fifty minutes outside Ridgemont. The whole inside of the bus smelled of stale socks. Most of the kids were asleep, though some were still awake and clutching their stuffed animals. Most of the guys were snoring loudly, their gangster hats knocked askew and their mouths pressed against the window. Back at the Ridgemont parking lot, Damone rolled home and The Rat stood trying to wake up enough to drive his father's car back up the hill. He saw Stacy Hamilton. "What happened to you?" she asked. "Oh," said The Rat, "just had a wild night. Where's Linda?" "She got a ride. Can I get a ride home with you?" "Sure," said The Rat. She crawled in the back of his car, and he drove her 2

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home. When they reached Valley View condominiums, he woke her up. "You'd better let me get out here," said Stacy. "My mother doesn't want anybody to see me in an evening gown being walked home by a guy at seven in the morning." "I understand." "Do you?" She rubbed her eyes. "Can I see you over the summer, Mark?" "If I'm around," said The Rat. She handed him her Disneyland photo. "Here. So you won't forget what I look like." The last thing The Rat did before going to sleep was stick the photo in the corner of his mirror.

Have a Bitchin Summer The Ridgemont Senior High School annual was made available on Monday of the last week of school. In an effort to U I/ keep reasonable order in the few classes still in session, A.S.B. Advisor Joseph Burke announced in the morning bulletin that an Annual Signing Party would be held in the gym during sixth period. Students came pouring into the gym to find another surprise. Burke had slipped in one more dance sponsored by the administration. The bleachers had been wheeled out, the lights were low, there was even a live band. The T-Birds, featuring one of the Robin Zander lookalikes on lead vocals, were already on stage. Stacy Hamilton and Linda Barrett walked into the gym slowly, head to head in deep conversation. "I'm torn," said Linda. "Doug wants to get married. I know I love him. We know each other so well it's the only thing left for us to do." 240

"Then do it," said Stacy. It was one of the rare times she could give Linda advice. "All your friends would be there. It would be very romantic. You and Doug, finally getting married." Linda nodded. Romantic, thought Stacy. Did I just say that? At the beginning of the year it seemed that sex was the most fun that she, or any of her girlfriends, knew about. Did you get him? Now she was wondering about romance. Well, Stacy figured, some people learn about romance before sex. She just got it the other way around. "I guess I'd go to junior college," said Linda, "while Doug worked at Barker Brothers. My parents say that I should just be a housewife, but they don't know what they're talking about. They send Jerome—the smart one—to college, and tell me to stay home. Doug says the same thing. But maybe I don't want to stay at home." "Linda," said Stacy, "you and Doug were meant for each other. He saved you from a fate worse than death." "What's that?" Stacy smiled. "High school boys!" The two girls walked through the Annual Signing Party, and soon spotted Mike Damone collapsed against the back of the gym. He was letting people approach him. Once the story of the erased bare ass came out, it was Ratner's and Damone's turn at celebritydom. Damone was signing annuals at a furious pace. "I remember erasing this one," Damone was telling some timid underclassman. "Don't you hate it when people start something in your annual and then cross it out?" "Yes," said the girl. "Have a bitchin' summer," said Damone. He had crossed out "I don't really know you, but ..." and just left "Take care, Mike Damone." A friend from Damone's P.E. class slammed down on the hardwood gym floor next to him. He flipped his annual into Damone's lap, nearly cracking him in the nuts. "Go for it," said the kid. Damone signed. 241

"Sheesh," said the kid. "My only fuckin' picture is on fuckin' page 98. I have a partial on 106, but that's bullshit. I look like I weigh about a thousand pounds." Damone handed the book back. "To the future of America—it's in your hands. Don't splash, Mike Damone." Mark Ratner showed up and sat down next to Damone. The two held court all Annual Signing Party. Mr. Vargas passed by, carefully documenting the event with the school's camera equipment. Linda Barrett was next to come by. She fell down next to Mike in a black low-cut dress. She'd gone home to change. She wrote "I LUST YOU" on the knee of Damone's jeans. "I'm back with Doug," said Linda. "We're going to get married as soon as I get out of college." "When is that?" "In four years, stupid." "Yeah," said Damone. "Sure. Doug'll be in the old-folks home, and one day you'll come cruising up and say, 'Let's get married.' But he'll be deaf by then so he won't even hear you." "... I'll never forget your bod," said Linda. She looked up to see Brad Hamilton standing nearby. "Hi, Bradley!" "Hi. You see Laurie Beckman and Steve Shasta? Look at that! They're about to go for it right there on the floor." Several teachers on both sides had already discovered the slow-dancing couple. Plotting their chaperonal strategy, they decided on a double-flashlight attack that pinned two separate beams on the couple. But it did not break Laurie and Steve up. Mr. Burke had to go out there and do it himself. Jeff Spicoli wandered up, annual in hand. He stopped to look at the band on stage. He stayed there, staring off into space, for several minutes. His hand was frozen in his hair, as if he'd forgotten to let go. "Hey, Spicoli," said Damone. Spicoli turned to see The Rat and Damone, Linda Barrett, Brad and Stacy. His head started bobbing. He was on some distant plane, no doubt ripping through the cosmos of his surf-ravaged mind. "Want us to sign your annual?" 242

"Ohhhhhhhhhhhh." Spicoli laughed menacingly. "It's so radical." He offered his annual to Damone. Spicoli's annual was filled with comments like, "Dear Jeff—I'm not real good friends with you, but you will never have any problems in life. There will always be someone to tell you where to get off." Or, "We got high in P.E., didn't we? Fuck class!" It made Damone feel sorry for the guy. He'd take his annual home to his mom and dad. His dad would ask what he spent the fifteen bucks on, and then he'd flip through the annual by the living-room light. "Jefffff? Why do all these boys keep thanking you for the drugs?" Damone signed Spicoli's book. "Good thing you're going to Hawaii," said Damone. " 'Cause you're gonna get kicked out of the house when your parents read your annual." Spicoli smiled and nodded. "Good luck to all you rats coming back to this crackerjack joint," he said. "I laugh in your face." He had written the same line in any annual he could get his hands on. Damone and The Rat watched Spicoli drift off to other parts of the Annual Signing Party. "You just know he's gonna grow up to be a shoe salesman," said The Rat.

The Ail-Night j-Eleven Man Brad could see it. He could hear it in the way people said goodbye and good luck to him. He could read the expression in their eyes. They looked at him and thought, Here's a guy I'll have to visit—when I come back. Everyone was leaving, all his friends. Even the ones who 2

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said they'd never go near college. Well, they were all talking about applications and acceptances these days. Even Linda Barrett, and that had been one of the big surprises for Brad. The way he heard it, Linda had come home from school after the Annual Signing Party when her mother broke the news. She had been dealing with Paula Crawford, Linda's RHS counselor, since last semester. No wonder they'd all talked her into taking the advanced classes. Linda had been accepted into Students International, the program that allows a select few to study in any college throughout Europe. Linda had thought about it for three seconds, Stacy told Brad, and decided it was exactly what she wanted to do. She started crying right there in her living room. Doug Stallworth had come over from work at Barker Brothers right in the middle of her crying fit. The Barrett family told Doug the news, expecting him to get all excited for Linda, too. And Doug, unbelievably enough, did get excited. Even though he knew he'd been left behind. They probably would become friends now, Brad thought. Ridgemont guys for life. "Life," Brad had become fond of saying, "I just don't know . . ." It was a joke and it wasn't a joke. These were the worst of times for Brad. He had now been reduced to the lowest position in teen life. He was right where, if he recalled correctly, he once said he wouldn't let ... well, a dog work. He was the all-night man at the Ridgemont y-Eleven. It was a slow night and Brad was wide awake. He figured that was the best way to be, especially if you had the kind of job where they showed you where the shotgun was. He had too much time to think on this job. That was the problem. But, it was bucks. It was bucks. Brad had taken to napping in the afternoons after school, and then powering down the coffee once he hit the y-Eleven. He once said he hated the stuff, would never drink it. Now he couldn't get enough. He reached for the pot without even thinking about it. Drank a cup without even realizing he had. 244

By 4:15, when Brad got home, he was ready to sleep. When friends asked him how he functioned on three hours' sleep, he told them all the same joke: "I sleep my ass off." On this particular night he had been leafing through the magazines, listening to the Muzak. It all happened very quickly. Two men pulled up in a black Camaro. One man in a nylon mask came running into the store and immediately spray-painted the automatic scanning camera above the door. Brad was too stunned to be scared. It had to be a joke. It was no joke. In another instant, the nylon-masked man stood in front of Brad with a .45—just like in the movie Dirty Harry. "Give it to me," he said. "Let's GO." "They empty and close the big safe at midnight here. I'm just the all-ni ..." "BULLSHIT!" the gunman bellowed. "I know this store. I know where the safe is. Why don't you just move over there, real slow, behind the donut case, and GET IT." He waved the gun at the donut case. It was true, about the hidden safe. Any big bills that came in after midnight—when they closed the big safe in the back—went into the hidden safe. And that was behind a panel at the back of the donut case. Hamilton walked over to the donut case. He caught a whiff of the fresh coffee he made and felt nauseous. "I'm instructed to tell you that we are on a video alarm system and there are other hidden cameras in the store . . ."

"JUST CAN IT, OKAY? GIVE ME THE MONEY OR I'LL BLOW YOUR FUCKING BRAINS OUT. DO YOU UNDERSTAND THAT?" "Okay," said Brad. His legs were now shaking uncontrollably. "I just started here, and they just taught me about this one thing. I don't care if you take their money. Just let me figure this out." "MOVE!" Brad opened the phony back of the donut case and fiddled with the strongbox combination. On his finger was the new class ring he'd picked up the other day. 2

45

"YOUR TIME IS RUNNING OUT, MR. HIGH SCHOOL ..." Brad was just about to get it open, just about there, when the phone rang. The gunman tightened. "OKAY, ANSWER IT, QUICK!" Brad looked up at the gunman. He wasn't nervous. He was pissed. Pissed at everything. Pissed at life. All he had wanted was a decent senior year. All he wanted. All he wanted was to keep his job, his car ... but that had been too much to ask. He got fired. He got caught beating off. Bad grades. And this guy! This asshole who waved a gun at him and called him Mr. High School. Tears welled in Brad Hamilton's eyes. "You motherfucker," he said. "Get off my CASE!" And then, just like it was the most natural thing in the world, Brad Hamilton reached for the hot, steaming coffee he had just made and poured it onto the gunman's hand.

"AAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRRRR!" The .45 rattled to the floor. The gunman was still looking in horror at his red, swelling hand when Brad snapped up the gun. The gunman's accomplice, poised behind the wheel of the black Camaro, spotted the foul-up and screeched out of the parking lot. "There goes your ride home, mister," said Brad, gun trained on the y-Eleven robber. "Look at the big man now! Look at Mr. I-Know-Where-the-Strongbox-Is!" The gunman managed, in all his pain, to heave a carton of Butterfingers at Brad as he howled around the front of the store. But Brad was on a roll, now. "Why don't you just show me where the police alarm is now . . . come on, guy." And that was the story of how Brad Hamilton got his old spot back on lunch court. There wasn't that much time left to enjoy it, but it felt good nonetheless. Even better was how the local reporters started hanging around, and Janine Wilson from local news, and all the stories started coming out. Even Mr. Hand told him he'd done The 246

American Thing—when your back is against the wall, all you can do is fight. Brad won. And damn if that phone didn't ring at the Hamiltons' late one night. "Hello?" "Hello, Brad!" "Yes? Who's calling?" "Bradley, this is Dennis Taylor down at the Ridgemont Drive Carl's. Listen, I hope I'm not bothering you right now." "I'm pretty busy," said Brad. "Brad, listen, I'm going district here in a couple weeks, and I was wondering if you wanted to come back down here and work with us again. You can have your old fryer back. We'd love to have you here. Everyone wants you back, buddy!" The nerve. The ultimate nerve of the guy. "Last time I talked to you," said Brad, "you wanted me to take a lie-detector test. Now it's 'Am I disturbing you?' ' "I know what's eating you, Brad. That incident with the money. Well, that money turned up in the dumpster after you left. I am sorry. I should have called." "Yeah, you should have." Brad paused. "And I probably would have taken your lousy job back if I hadn't taken a district supervisor job myself—with y-Eleven."

The Last Bell On the last day of school, Mike Damone stood at his locker and cleaned out the last mimeographed sheet crammed into the back corner. "If this paper could talk," he said. Standing next to him was The Rat. "Well, Damone. In the end, it looks like it comes down to just you and me." "Looks like it." Damone clanged the locker door shut. "A very touching 2

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moment," he said, "I feel like I just ripped my heart out. A whole year I spent in that little box. It's like a brother to me." "You could get the same locker next year." "I considered it. It's a pretty good location. I'll have to see where my classes are. This is a good sosh area, though. You get a good crowd that comes by." The school was all tank tops and t-shirts, red faces and Frisbee discs. You knew it was almost over when people actually saved the last issue of the Reader. For once it wasn't blowing all over campus. "Stacy wants you, you know," said Damone. "You should go for it." "No way, man," said The Rat. "I can't wait to get my car and head for Flagstaff." "She should come to you," said Damone. "Says who?" "Says The Attitude." "The Attitude," said The Rat, "is only good until you meet the right girl." "Whatever you say, Rat." Students were still signing their annuals, hanging lazily out the windows, and talking with friends. Mr. Bates was playing his ukulele in social studies class. On this day, school was a countdown. There were many rumors of an elaborate end-of-the-year stunt for the last day. But the fact was, given the chance of staying and pranking or getting out . . . Ridgemont students went. Across the commons, Damone saw Steve Shasta striding down the hallway in all his glory. Shasta had been selected for a Yale scholarship, their first for soccer. They had pulled him out of class to tell him, and his mom was sitting there in the office and everything. Teachers were giving him investment advice. They had given him the treatment in the local press, too. Now, Damone wasn't in the habit of asking a lot of people to sign his annual, but it was Shasta. You couldn't help but yell something at the guy. 248

"Hey, Shasta! You hear about the big party on Marine Street?" Shasta caught a look at who was calling his name. "Yep," he said. Mike Damone trotted up with The Rat following behind. "Sign my annual, Shasta." "Yeah," said Shasta, bored. "Bet you're happy." ti\r tt Yep. Shasta opened Damone's annual to a soccer shot and signed, right under his picture: "Best wishes, Steve Shasta." Damone laughed as if it were a joke. Okay, he felt like saying, now sign it for real. But that was it. Shasta was already a big soccer star. No time for personal messages that might be worth something someday. "Thanks," said Damone. The Rat had to go to class, so Damone sat out on lunch court for a time. Brad Hamilton was sitting out there too, finishing an assignment for Mrs. George's Project English class. It was the ten-year letter she asked all her seniors to write. The letter was meant for yourself, and Mrs. George was going to mail it back to you (at your parents' address) in ten years. "Be relaxed," she'd said. "Be natural. Say exactly what's on your mind today. This is one paper that will not be corrected for grammar." Damone decided to take a walk by the 200 Building, where Mrs. G. taught class. What he found was no real surprise at the end of any semester. It was a full speech class. They were all there on the last day, the last-chance students appearing to get their grades. Damone took a seat by the open door. The final on this last day was a five-minute career speech, to have been prepared on 3X5 cards. The speech was meant to hit on all the points listed on the board in Mrs. George's neat script. 1. What is my career? 2. Do I like my career?

249

3. What are its financial rewards? 4. What kind of schooling does it require? 5. Did I enjoy this class? Damone watched as Jeff Spicoli, the last of the Ridgemont surfers, stood at the front of the class reading from a three-page manuscript. It was a speech about the sixties, which was the wrong topic, and it had probably seen more than one teacher this year, but Spicoli read it with passion. He read it, in fact, like it was the first time he'd had a chance to look at it. "Everything was going great in the sixties," Spicoli said. "Diseases were being cured. We were winning the space program." He looked up, for eye contact. "Then everything went off balance. A president was assassinated. The divorce rate approached one marriage in two. A president was caught in an attempt to lie and cover up with more lies. A nation was shocked and dismayed." He looked up again and appeared to ad-lib. "It was awesome. "What has happened to the generation or two earlier that was dedicated to answering all the unanswered questions? For the latter part of the seventies it appeared America gave up asking." Some clapped, but the speech was not over. Spicoli had just lost his place in the manuscript. "With the care-free life of the fifties and the problems of the sixties and all the even larger problems of the seventies and eighties, who knows what will happen in the future? With nuclear power and gas shortages and many other problems, I doubt that it can get much worse. Hopefully the past has taught us we should not give up before finding the solutions." Spicoli mumbled a last line, but it was drowned in applause. The clock was inching closer to the 2:00 mark that meant The End of School. "And I really like this class, Mrs. George." "Thank you, Jeff," said Mrs. George. "But you didn't say anything about your career." "Well, I'm glad you asked me about that," said Spicoli. "It just so happens that I was going to go to Mexico this sum250

mer. I had it all planned and everything. But the time came around, and I looked at the bottom line, and you know what? I just didn't have the bucks. It was a total drag. So I had to go find a place to work. And I just want to warn you that you may see me this summer ..." He gulped, threw his hair out of his eyes. "Working at Alpha Beta." He paused. "And it's only for six weeks, so don't hassle me." Mrs. George smiled. "Is that the truth, Jeff?" "Any amount of money," said Spicoli, holding out his hand. "Okay, well thank you for your speech. Have a nice summer, Jeff." Spicoli took his seat, bowing to applause. "Now where's Valerie?" "Oh," said a girlfriend of Valerie's. "She went to Mission Viejo's prom last night. She knew she wouldn't be here today." "Well. Her grade goes down from an A— to a B+." "I don't think she cares," said her girlfriend. It was at that moment that Brad Hamilton walked into the classroom to deliver to Mrs. G. his ten-year letter. The speech class stopped in silent respect. A buzz passed through the class. That's the guy! That's the guy who poured coffee on the armed robber!! "Sorry I'm late with this, Mrs. G.," said Brad. "I wanted to do some extra thinking about this letter." Brad Hamilton placed his letter on Mrs. G.'s desk. Here was the lunch-court king of last September, toppled from grace in October, back on top in June. He made it look easy. Looking back, he had been struggling all year long just to make his car payments, cover his schoolwork, and just stay even. He had been busting his ass, he figured, when his parents, at the same age, were probably busy just being seventeen. College could wait another year, Brad had decided. He was going to put in a full summer at the y-Eleven, keeping those little guys out of the store and pulling in the coin. Who knew where it would take him, but he was ready for the ride. All Brad knew right now was that sometime ten years from now he would be visiting his parents, and they would say, "Oh Brad, something came for you in the mail." And Brad

would open a decade-old letter, this record of his tumultuous senior year:

Dear Brad: This graduation business sure sneaks up on you. Every year I get my annual back, and it's rilled with "Have a nice summer." Now it's "Have a nice life." That's going to take some getting used to. If I could go back and do this year over, there are a few things I wouldn't have done. I wouldn't have bought a gas guzzler, and I wouldn't have worked at Carl's. I would have taken another class with Mr. Hand. I would have taken Dina Phillips to Hawaii for three weeks, and I then would have married Linda Barrett. As for my friends, I wouldn't change one of them, for they are the best group of friends a guy could have. Sincerely, Brad Hamilton

He walked out of speech class and over to the parking lot, to The Cruising Vessel. Stacy was waiting for him by the car. "Let me guess," said Brad. "You want a ride home." "Mind reader," said Stacy. Brad opened her car door first, a grand gesture for him, and then walked around to his side. He got inside The Vessel and gunned the engine. "All in all," he said, "an excellent year." "I know it was," said Stacy, "just wish me luck. I have two more years here." They headed down Ridgemont Drive, past fast-food row. As he drove, Brad spotted a couple of unkempt underclassmen loitering on the street corner. He stuck his head completely out of the window to shout at them. "HEY," he yelled, "WHY DON'T YOU GET A /OB!!!' Back at Ridgemont High, a motorcycle ripped along Luna Street. There were war cries coming from the parking lot. The third bell had rung. 252

Grateful Acknowledgments David Obst, Irving Azoff, Art Linson, Neal Preston, Bob Bookman, Joel Bernstein, Fred Hills, Danny Bramson, Ron Bernstein, Kathy DeRouville, Erica Spellman, Jackie Snyder, Cindy Crowe, Alan Hergott, David Rensin, Virginia Johnstone, Tom Pollock, Bill Maguire, Leslie Ellen, Louise Goffin, Judy Boasberg, George Cossolias, Judd Klinger, Susan Blond, The Thugs, Debbie Gold, Richard C. Woods, Karla Bonoff, Harold Schmidt, Daniel Kortchmar, Shaun Daniel, Thorn Mount, Susan Bolotin, Abigale Haness, John Dodds, Kevin McCormick, Lori Zech, David Bernstein, Barry Steinman, Jann S. Wenner, Riley Kathryn Ellis, Martha Cochrane, and Wendy Sherman.

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$5.95

Welcome to lunch court. That's Spicoli over there, trying hard to unwrap a bologna sandwich. His eyes are still red-rimmed from the three bowls of dope he smoked after his morning surf. Stacy Hamilton doesn't look any different even though she finally lost her virginity last night. Linda Barrett, Stacy's best bud, wants to hear all about it. After all, she gives lessons. And here comes Brad Hamilton, king of the lunch court and prince of the fast-food employee hierarchy. Brad's a guy who takes pride in his fries. Mike Damone takes pride in The Attitude, which he developed in Philly, his hometown, where "life is cheap." And here's that wussy Mark Ratner. Girls make him sweat. He'll do more than sweat when he turns up in the yearbook class picture with something missing. These kids are, uh, the future of America. Cameron Crowe spent a year with them at Ridgemont High in Anytown, California, and if you can't imagine or can't remember (last week? last year? last decade?) what it's like to have acne, bio lab, Saturday night car cruises, and the embarrassment of parents, Fast Times at Ridgetnont High will bring it all home for you. It's tense, traumatic and marginally insane—and just like high school, it's poignant, entertaining and totally true.

Cameron Crowe lives in Los Angeles and is a free-lance writer, contributing to Railing Stone, Playboy, and The Los Angeles Times.

Simon and Schuster New York 0981

Cover design © 1981 by One Plus One Studio Cover photograph by Sigrid Estrada Hand colored by Bob Felsenstein

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Fast times at ridgemont high a true story -

Translation of "ridgemont high" in Spanish

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It was after I saw Fast Times at Ridgemont High.

Fue después de que vi "Fast Times at Ridgemont High".

The following year, she appeared in the TV movie Babies Having Babies, and the short-lived series Fast Times, a TV adaptation of the 1982 film Fast Times at Ridgemont High (Wells played Linda Barrett, portrayed by Phoebe Cates in the film).

Al año siguiente apareció en la película Babies Having Babies y en la serie de breve duración Fast Times (Tiempos rápidos), una adaptación de la popular película de 1982 Aquel excitante curso (Fast Times at Ridgemont High).

I let you watch fast times at ridgemont high too early.

Te dejé ver Aquel excitante curso demasiado pronto.

Before the book was released, Fast Times at Ridgemont High was optioned for a film.

Antes de que el libro fuese publicado, los derechos de Fast Times at Ridgemont High ya habían sido vendidos para convertirse en una película.

His book, Fast Times at Ridgemont High: A True Story, came out in 1981.

El fruto de esas vivencias se plasmó en el libro Fast Times at Ridgemont High: A True Story (1981).

For me, Fast Times at Ridgemont High.

Para mi, Tiempos Rápidos en Ridgemont High.

You should watch "Fast Times at Ridgemont High".

Deberías ver "Tiempos Rápidos en la Alta Ridgemont".

"Madonna was married to this Ridgemont High alum."

¿Con qué alumno de la secundaria Ridgemont... estuvo casada Madonna?

Henley also contributed "Love Rules" to the 1982 Fast Times at Ridgemont High movie soundtrack.

Henley también contribuyó en "Love Rules" de la banda sonora de "Fast Times at Ridgemont High".

Your fast times at Ridgemont High quote, that proves you belong at the adult table.

Tu rapidez en la alta cotización de Ridgemont, eso prueba que perteneces a la mesa de los adultos.

Then watch Fast Times At Ridgemont High 1982, took and enjoy.

Ponte Fast Times in Ridgemont High (1982), fuma y disfruta.

Such is the same case for the song "The Critic" which is taken from the film Fast Times At Ridgemont High (1982).

También se tomó otra para la canción "The Critic" de la película Fast Times at Ridgemont High de 1982.

"Madonna was married to this Ridgemont High alum."

"Madonna estaba casada con este alumno de Ridgemont".

Vans later Nike Air Max 95 Womens sent the trainers to the production staff of "Fast Times At Ridgemont High" (1982), a Hollywood film that would go on to become a cult classic.

Más tarde, Vans envió a los entrenadores al equipo de producción de" Fast Times At Ridgemont High"(1982), una película de Hollywood que se convertiría en un clásico de culto. Aparecieron pesadamente. Las furgonetas seguirían vendiendo por millones.

Oingo Boingo appeared in a number of soundtracks in the early to mid-1980s, including Fast Times at Ridgemont High, which features "Goodbye, Goodbye".

Luego, la banda apareció en una serie de bandas sonoras en la primera mitad de la década de 1980, como en la de Fast Times at Ridgemont High, que cuenta con "Goodbye, Goodbye".

Since his film debut with a minor role in Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982), opposite Judge Reinhold and Sean Penn, Cage has appeared in a wide range of films, both mainstream and offbeat.

Desde su pequeño papel en Fast Times at Ridgemont High con Sean Penn, Cage ha aparecido en una gran variedad de películas, tanto convencionales como poco convencionales.

I watched "The Daily Show," fell into the best sleep I ever had, woke up, watched "Fast Times at Ridgemont High," had a vanilla-scented jacuzzi bath.

Miré Daily Show, he dormido como nunca me he despertado, he mirado Fast Times at Ridgemont High y me he hecho un jacuzzi a la vainilla

Following this success, Crowe wrote the screenplay for 1984's The Wild Life, the pseudo-sequel to Fast Times at Ridgemont High.

Después de aquel éxito, Crowe escribió el guion de The wild life, una pseudo secuela de Aquel excitante curso.

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Источник: https://context.reverso.net/translation/english-spanish/ridgemont+high
Netflix.

Accordingly, Is Fast Times at Ridgemont High a book?

Fast Times at Ridgemont High is a 1982 American coming-of-age comedy-drama film directed by Amy Heckerling (in her feature directorial debut), from a screenplay by Cameron Crowe, based on his 1981 book Fast Times at Ridgemont High: A True Story.

in the same way How many Oscars did Fast Times at Ridgemont High win?

Though “Fast Times” was ignored by the Academy, it features three Academy Award winning actors: Nicolas Cage, Sean Penn and Forrest Whitaker. Cage would later win an Oscar for Best Actor for “Leaving Las Vegas” (1995).

How old was Stacy in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

Stacy works at a pizza store at Ridgemont Mall along with her friend, Linda Barrett. Fans also wondered How old was Stacy in Fast Times at Ridgemont High? She was fifteen-year-old and also later got pregnant after her first sexual experience with Mike Damone.

Is Fast Times at Ridgemont High on Netflix Canada?

Yes, Fast Times at Ridgemont High is now available on Canadian Netflix.

Is Ridgemont High a real school?

“Ridgemont” is a fictional name. Crowe applied it to Clairemont High School in San Diego where he attended the school undercover. … Most of the exteriors of Ridgemont High School were shot at Van Nuys High School, and other scenes were shot at Canoga Park High School and Torrance High.

Is there a new Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

WILL THERE BE A FAST TIMES AT RIDGEMONT HIGH REMAKE? As of now, there are no plans to reboot Fast Times at Ridgemont High, so the live table read will have to suffice!

Why is Fast Times at Ridgemont High a classic?

Certainly, one of the reasons why it proved so popular at the time and has remained in the pop culture conversation is due to the film’s honest depiction of that milieu, gleaned via a rather unique endeavour. … On the surface, Fast Times has all the makings of a typical teen flick from the eighties.

Which actors won Fast Times at Ridgemont High Oscars?

Beyond this, Fast Times at Ridgemont High served as the start to a number of Oscar winners’ careers, including Nicolas Cage, Sean Penn, and Forest Whitaker.

Who are the twins in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

They played the silent twin bodyguards Igg and Ook in Hudson Hawk and as conjoined twin Addams family members Dexter and Donald in The Addams Family and Addams Family Values. They also played as the “angry twins” in Fast Times At Ridgemont High.

How old were actors in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

IMDb Rating: 7.2

Actor Age then Age now
Jennifer Jason Leigh 20 59
Judge Reinhold 25 64
Robert Romanus 26 65
Brian Backer 26 64

Who is the girl in the Corvette in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982) – Nancy Wilson as Beautiful Girl in Car – IMDb.

Is Pat Benatar in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

The character Pat Bernardo in Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982) was inspired by Benatar.

What school was used for Ridgemont High?

Fast Times at Ridgemont High was shot in Los Angeles, La Crescenta, and Santa Monica, California, USA. Filming locations included Canoga Park High School, Anderson W Clark Magnet High School, Santa Monica Place, Sherman Oaks Galleria, and Van Nuys High School.

Who got Stacy pregnant in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

The storyline in question follows 15-year-old sophomore Stacy Hamilton (Jennifer Jason Leigh) who starts off the school year as a virgin, only to become impregnated by fellow classmate Mike Damone (Robert Romanus).

How old were the actors in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

IMDb Rating: 7.2

Actor Age then Age now
Sean Penn 22 61
Jennifer Jason Leigh 20 59
Judge Reinhold 25 64
Robert Romanus 26 65

Was Julia Roberts in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

Julia Roberts voiced Jennifer Jason Leigh’s Stacy Hamilton while Matthew McConaughey and Dane Cook read the parts of Stacy’s love interests Mike Damone and Mark Ratner, respectively.

Is Fast Times at Ridgemont High a classic?

Thirty-five years later, Cameron Crowe’s coming-of-age teen movie is a timeless classic that continues to dole out life lessons.

What era was Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

Fast Times at Ridgemont High (United States, 1982) Because Fast Times at Ridgemont High arrived in movie theaters during the height of the ’80s “teenspoitation” era, it has often been unfairly lumped together with Porky’s and its successors and copycats.

Who is the pizza delivery guy in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

Comedian and actor Taylor Negron has died after a long battle with cancer. The 57-year-old was best known for his role as a pizza delivery boy in the 1982 comedy, “Fast Times At Ridgemont High.”

Why do they sniff the paper in fast times?

After the paper is passed out, the students put the page up to their noses and deeply inhale. This was a popular school ritual of the ’60s, ’70s and early ’80s as photocopying machines were very expensive, so ditto machines were used. The resulting copies did not get you high but they smelled good.

Is Nancy Wilson in fast times heart?

At the time, Wilson was 41 and undergoing fertility treatments, which were difficult to schedule around a rock tour and appearances. Wilson had played “Beautiful Girl in Car” in Crowe’s Fast Times at Ridgemont High, then had a small speaking part in The Wild Life.

What Led Zeppelin song is played in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

The scene immediately cuts to Rat driving love interest Stacy, blasting Led Zeppelin’s “Kashmir,” off their “Physical Graffiti” album — a glaring mistake to the band’s Zep fanatics.

Which Wilson sister was in Fast Times at Ridgemont High?

Nancy Wilson in ‘Fast Times at Ridgemont High’ – Musician Movie Cameos. In the 1982 flick ‘Fast Times at Ridgemont High,’ a young Nancy Wilson of Heart caught the eye of Brad Hamilton (Judge Reinhold) at a streetlight.


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Fast Times At Ridgemont High: 10 Awesome, Totally Awesome Behind-The-Scenes Facts

In the summer of 1982, a little teen comedy by the name of Fast Times at Ridgemont High came onto the scene and became one of the most iconic ’80s movies, making instant stars out of its large ensemble cast. Nearly 40 years later, Amy Heckerling’s cult classic, which was based on the real-life experiences of writer Cameron Crowe, remains just as righteous, and just as "awesome, totally awesome" as ever before.

But, as great as the movie is, some of the behind-the-scenes facts from the making of Fast Times at Ridgemont High are just as awesome, just as righteous, and just as entertaining as spotting a young Nicolas Cage flipping burgers at the local mall. Here are some of those stories.

Fast Times At Ridgemont High Is The Result Of Writer Cameron Crowe Spending A Year Undercover As A High School Senior

The story of Fast Times at Ridgemont High begins in 1979 when Cameron Crowe, who was writing for Rolling Stone at time time, published a book by the same name containing observations after spending a year undercover as a high school senior. Upon the release of the film in August 1982, The Washington Post published a lengthy profile on Crowe and his year masquerading as a 17-year-old even though he was well into his 20s at the time.

Over the course of nine months, Cameron Crowe acted as if he were just any normal student with the only people in on the gag being Ridgemont High School’s principal, his homeroom teacher, and several other instructors. When it came time to write the book, Crowe left himself out of the narrative and instead focused on six major characters, which would become the basis for teens featured in the movie three years later.

David Lynch Was Approached About Directing Fast Times At Ridgemont High Before Amy Heckerling Signed On

Amy Heckerling would famously make her directorial debut with Fast Times at Ridgemont High, but before the young filmmaker signed on to helm the teen comedy, the whole project could have gone in a very different direction. When speaking with Variety for the film’s 35th anniversary, Cameron Crowe revealed that a Universal Pictures executive really wanted David Lynch to direct, going as far as to invite to visionary director to the studio for a meeting:

He had a very wry smile on his face as I sat talking with him. He went and read it. We met again. He was very, very sweet about it, but slightly perplexed we thought of him. He said hit was a really nice story but ‘it’s not really the kind of thing that I do, but good luck.’ He got into the white VW bug and drove off.

Okay, who doesn’t want to see a Lynchian version of Fast Times now?

The Ridgemont Mall Scenes All Had To Be Shot At Night Because The Sherman Oaks Galleria Was Still In Operation

A large portion of Fast Times at Ridgemont High takes place at the Ridgemont Mall, which was filmed on location at the since-remodeled Sherman Oaks Galleria in Los Angeles. Since the mall was very munch in operation at the time, production on the movie had to take place during night, as director Amy Heckerling noted in Variety’s 35th anniversary piece. Something similar had been done at the Monroeville Mall in suburban Pittsburgh for Dawn of the Dead in 1978, though Fast Times didn’t have to worry about zombies getting drunk and wrecking golf carts between takes.

Nicolas Cage’s Experience On The Set Of Fast Times At Ridgemont High Led To Abandoning His Coppola Name

Like many actors, Nicolas Cage has used a stage name for the vast majority of his career, but there was one movie early on where he went by his legal name: Nicolas Coppola. The nephew of acclaimed filmmaker Francis Ford Coppola, Cage was just 17 years old when he joined the cast of Fast Times at Ridgemont High as “Brad’s Bud” at All-American Burger, and the experience, as he told The Hollywood Reporter, was enough for him to make a major change:

And I was surrounded by actors, whose names I won’t mention, who were not very open to the idea of a young guy named “Coppola” being an actor. So that movie was instrumental in me changing my name because of the kind of unfortunate responses to my last name.

In that same interview, Cage also revealed he originally auditioned for the role of Brad Hamilton (which later went to Judge Reinhold), but was rejected because his age prevented him from working long hours.

Jeff Spicoli’s Dream Sequence Originally Took Place On The Tonight Show With Johnny Carson

The original version of Jeff Spicoli’s dream sequence in the Fast Times at Ridgemont High book sees the resident stoner being interviewed on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, but the scene had to be changed prior to the start of production. According to The Uncool (the official website for all things Cameron Crowe), Carson, and several other talk show hosts including David Letterman and Merv Griffin turned down the opportunity, resulting in scene being completely rewritten to the one in the final version of the movie.

The Led Zeppelin IV Gaffe In Fast Times At Ridgemont High Was Written In Because The Studio Couldn’t Secure The Album’s Rights

There is the famous segment in Fast Times at Ridgemont High where Mike Damone (Robert Romanus) goes over his five-point plan to woo a girl to Mark “Rat” Ratner (Brian Backer) which involves playing side one of Led Zeppelin IV, only for the next scene to cut in with Rat playing Led Zeppelin’s rocking “Kashmir” while driving Stacy Hamilton (Jennifer Jason Leigh). When speaking with the New York Daily News, Cameron Crowe explained that this wasn’t a flub in the editing process but instead something to do with the publishing rights of the album. Crowe went on to say that a decision was made to imply that Rat had messed up his big moment with his crush.

There Was One Take Of The Iconic Bathroom Scene That Left The Studio In Shock

One of the hardest scenes in Fast Times at Ridgemont High to watch in a crowded room takes place when Linda Barrett (Phoebe Cates) walks in on Brad Hamilton (Judge Reinhold) pleasuring himself. And, while no full-frontal male nudity is shown, there was one unused take that writer Cameron Crowe said left studio executives laughing in shock, as he revealed in a 2017 interview on The Dan Patrick Show:

There was one take the director, Amy Heckerling, did just for the studio where the camera pans down to Judge and lets just say he was carrying a very large accessory that didn’t make it into the movie but made people laugh in shock.

That particular take has never been shown publicly, but the movie nearly had an X rating for a completely different scene.

Fast Times At Ridgemont High Originally Had An X Rating Because Of Male Genitalia

When making Fast Times at Ridgemont High, director Amy Heckerling wanted to flip the script so to speak and show male genitalia in the sex scene between Rat and Stacy instead of taking the commonly-taken route of showing a naked female. In the 35th anniversary piece on the movie in Variety, it was noted that when the MPAA watched the movie (and that specific scene), it gave it an X-rating, which would have severely limited the number of people who could see it in theaters. And while there was some resistance to changing the scene, Heckerling eventually decided to blur the shot and go with an R-rating.

Forest Whitaker Was Singing At The USC Conservatory When He Was Cast As Charles Jefferson

Forest Whitaker played the tough-as-nails high school football player Charles Jefferson in Fast Times at Ridgemont High, but when the future Academy Award winner auditioned for the role that would forever change his life, he was a student at the USC Conservatory and decided to audition with a few of his opera buddies. During a 2019 appearance on Live with Kelly and Ryan, Whitaker revealed that he didn’t expect to move into his acting career so quickly and went up to San Francisco to another conservatory immediately after filming his scenes.

Sean Penn, Who Remained In Character The Whole Time, Didn’t Introduce Himself Until The Final Day Of Shooting

Sean Penn may not enjoy acting anymore, but at one point in his career, he was one of the most notorious method actors in Hollywood, even when he was cast as Jeff Spicoli in Fast Times at Ridgemont High. To celebrate the 30th anniversary of the film’s release in 2012, Cameron Crowe shared a story with The Uncool about the final day of shooting decades earlier. Most of the writeup is about being nostalgic and proud of what they accomplished, but there’s a brief line about Penn that was just too good to pass up:

Sean Penn, who’d been in character the entire filming, arrived in a brown corduroy jacket and introduced himself. ‘I’m Sean,’ he announced.

And you thought Daniel Day-Lewis on the set of There Will Be Blood was something.

It’s hard to say if we’ll ever get another teen comedy like Fast Times at Ridgemont High, but there are still some contenders on the list of 2021 movies that could carve out a nice legacy for themselves one day.

Philip grew up in Louisiana (not New Orleans) before moving to St. Louis after graduating from Louisiana State University-Shreveport. When he's not writing about movies or television, Philip can be found being chased by his three kids, telling his dogs to stop yelling at the mailman, or yelling about professional wrestling to his wife. If the stars properly align, he will talk about For Love Of The Game being the best baseball movie of all time.

Источник: https://www.cinemablend.com/news/2572322/fast-times-at-ridgemont-high-awesome-totally-awesome-behind-the-scenes-facts
Fast Times at Ridgemont High.jpg

Fast Times at Ridgemont High is a 1982 American coming-of-age comedy film directed by Amy Heckerling which released on August 13, 1982 by Universal Pictures.

It is adapted from Cameron Crowe's 1981 book of the same name.

Plot

The film centers on a group of high school students growing up in Southern California.

Cast

  • Sean Penn as Jeff Spicoli
  • Judge Reinhold as Brad Hamilton
  • Jennifer Jason Leigh as Stacy Hamilton
  • Robert Romanus as Mike Damone
  • Phoebe Cates as Linda Barrett
  • Brian Backer as Mark Ratner
  • Amanda Wyss as Lisa
  • Ray Walston as Mr. Hand
  • Forest Whitaker as Charles Jefferson
  • Scott Thomson as Arnold
  • Vincent Schiavelli as Mr. Vargas
  • Lana Clarkson as Mrs. Vargas
  • Eric Stoltz as Stoner Bud
  • Anthony Edwards as Stoner Bud
  • Nicolas Cage as Brad's Bud
  • Pamela Springsteen as Dina Phillips
  • Kelli Maroney as Cindy
  • D.W. Brown as Ron Johnson
  • Taylor Negron as Pizza Guy

Production

"Fast Times at Ridgemont High" is adapted from a book that Cameron Crowe wrote after a year spent at Clairemont High School in San Diego, California.

He went undercover to do research for his 1981 book, "Fast Times at Ridgemont High: A True Story" about his observations of the high school and the students he befriended there, including then-student Andy Rathbone, on whom the character Mark "Rat" Ratner was modeled.

Principal photography for "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" began on November 2, 1981 and ended on December 28, 1981.

Filming took place in California (in Los Angeles, La Crescenta, Santa Monica, Granada Hills, Inglewood, Northridge, Brentwood, Sherman Oaks and Van Nuys).

Director Amy Heckerling said she was seeking to make a comedy film that was less structured than conventional ones, and more like "American Graffiti" so that "if you woke up and found yourself living in the movie, you'd be happy. I wanted that kind of feel."

Nicolas Cage lied about his age so that he could get a bigger part, but the producers eventually found out that he was only 17 years old at the time.

According to Brian Backer, Jennifer Jason Leigh and her family allowed him to stay at their house for no charge until filming wrapped being that he flew down to star in the film from his hometown of Brooklyn and was pretty broke.

For his masturbation scene, Judge Reinhold brought a large dildo to work with, unbeknown to the rest of the cast. The look of horror and disgust on Phoebe Cates' face is genuine.

Director Amy Heckerling stated that she got Phoebe Cates to overcome her fear of doing the topless scene by assuring her that it would only be for a few seconds and thus wouldn't allow people much time to stare.

Ironically, in the following years (during the era of videotape home video), it became a running joke at many video rental stores that copies of "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" often suffered a predictable flicker during the topless moment in question because so many renters had paused the video on that shot (which caused excessive wear on the tape at that location).

During shooting of the film, Sean Penn got so into character that he only answered as Spicoli. In fact, the door on his dressing room was labeled "Spicoli" instead of "Sean Penn." According to Amy Heckerling, Penn and his friends were actually smoking marijuana in the van as they exited for the prom.

The mall scenes were shot during the night from when the mall closed at 9:30 to when it opened at 9:00. The two kids who Damone scalps the tickets to were under 18 years old and due to labor laws, they couldn't film past certain hours, so they only had a ten-minute window to shoot their scenes.

Mike Damone's nude scene with Stacy that was filmed and never used was stated by Amy Heckerling to show the natural vulnerability between two young teenagers.

The intent was to show each of them undressing, and then show them standing before each other fully naked, full frontal, vulnerable and nervous. However, the scene was pulled due to an impending X-rating and has never been released.

The scene where Linda instructs Stacy how to give a blowjob originally took place in a hot tub with both girls naked. The actresses were both up for it, but it was changed to avoid getting an X rating. One of the producers joked with director Amy Heckerling that they should film it anyway even though they knew they wouldn't use it.

The role of Mr. Hand was originally offered to Fred Gwynne who turned it down due to his objections over the tone of the sexual content in the film. The role was ultimately given to Ray Walston.

Sean Penn improvised during his takes and tried to find ways to aggravate actor Ray Walston (who played Mr. Hand) even off camera. He also did things to get genuinely startled reactions from the extras who played his classmates through unexpected improvisations.

Some of the actors who had auditioned for roles in the film were Ralph Macchio, Matthew Broderick, Meg Tilly, Michelle Pfeiffer, Lori Loughlin, Elisabeth Shue, Kelly Preston, Rosanna Arquette, Carrie Fisher, Ally Sheedy and D.B. Sweeney.

Judge Reinhold was the boyfriend of Amy Heckerling's best friend, who was also doing casting. He got the part of Brad Hamilton anyway without the producers knowing.

According to producer Art Linson, at the first screening of the finished cut, then Universal Pictures head Robert Rehme shifted uncomfortably in his seat at all the crude language and sexual situations and eventually walked out before the film was over.

Linson also said that the brass at Universal (Who were old conservative types) hated the film and wanted nothing to do with the release.

Universal originally planned to only release "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" in the Western part of the United States for a few weeks before sending it off to cable (regional releases were still common at this time) due to the belief that there was no audience for it.

After an excellent response, the film had a wide theatrical release three weeks later with a big opening in the Eastern United States and had a long run in theaters.

Box Office

"Fast Times at Ridgemont High" grossed $2,545,674 during its opening weekend. Overall, it grossed $27,092,880 on an estimated budget of $4,500,000.

Critical Reception

On Rotten Tomatoes, "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" has an approval rating of 77% based on 52 reviews with an average rating of 6.7\10. The site's consensus reads: "While Fast Times at Ridgemont High features Sean Penn's legendary performance, the film endures because it accurately captured the small details of school, work, and teenage life."

Metacritic assigned the film a weighted average score of 61 out of 100 (based on 21 critics) indicating "generally favorable reviews."

Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times called it a "scuz-pit of a movie", but praised the performances by Jennifer Jason Leigh, Sean Penn, Phoebe Cates and Judge Reinhold.

Janet Maslin wrote that the film was a "jumbled but appealing teen-age comedy with something of a fresh perspective on the subject."

Marjorie Baumgarten of the Austin Chronicle said: "Amy Heckerling’s portrait of high school/shopping mall life in Southern California is still just about as good as it gets...The panoply of teen types and turmoils is dead-on accurate."

Keith Phipps of The A.V. Club called it "a Trojan horse of a teen comedy that balanced lowbrow gags with subtle humor, genuine insight—Crowe spent a year undercover as a high-school student—and pathos."

Variety said: "The nice thing is that [Cameron] Crowe and director Amy Heckerling have provided something pleasant to observe in all of these characters though they really are sadly lacking in anything gripping."

TV Guide Magazine said: "The film's most memorable character is the perpetually stoned surfer played by Sean Penn. His confrontations with Mr. Hand (Walston), a draconian history teacher, provide the film's finest moments."

Elvis Mitchell of The New York Times wrote: "There's a lot to make [Amy Heckerling's] film likeable, but not much to hold it together."

The Wall Street Journal wrote: "At least the film has a sense of humor and a degree of energy... [but the] film never carries any of its characters or situations much beyond weary cliche."

The Washington Post called "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" an "uninspired blend, integrating the boys from Porky's and the girls from Foxes into a vehicle resembling the worst of American Graffiti and the best of Rock 'n' Roll High School".

Источник: https://filmpedia-the-films.fandom.com/wiki/Fast_Times_at_Ridgemont_High
Film Registry

The movie Fast Times at Ridgemont High was based on the book Fast Times at Ridgemont High: A True Story.

Movie details for Fast Times at Ridgemont High

The movie was released in 1982 and directed by Amy Heckerling. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Sean Penn, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Judge Reinhold, Robert Romanus, Brian Backer, Phoebe Cates, Ray Walston, Scott Thomson, Vincent Schiavelli, Amanda Wyss, D.W. Brown, Forest Whitaker, Kelli Maroney, Tom Nolan, Blair Tefkin, Eric Stoltz, Stanley Davis Jr., James Russo, James Bolt (II) and Nicolas Cage.

 

Read More About This Movie

Before he became an overrated filmmaker, Cameron Crowe (Jerry Maguire) was a reporter for Rolling Stone who was so youthful looking that he could go undercover for a year at a California high school and write a book about it. He wrote the script for this ... Read More

Before he became an overrated filmmaker, Cameron Crowe (Jerry Maguire) was a reporter for Rolling Stone who was so youthful looking that he could go undercover for a year at a California high school and write a book about it. He wrote the script for this film, based on that book, and it launched the careers of several young actors, including Jennifer Jason Leigh, Judge Reinhold, Phoebe Cates, and, above all, Sean Penn. The story line is episodic, dealing with the lives of iconic teen types: one of the school's cool kids, a nerd, a teen queen, and, most enjoyably, the class stoner (Penn), who finds himself at odds with a strict history teacher (a wonderfully spiky Ray Walston). This is not a great movie but very entertaining and, for a certain age group, a seminal movie experience. --Marshall Fine

Источник: http://www.basedonabook.com/movie/2508/Fast-Times-at-Ridgemont-High.html

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